Naturally Sweet



I think it is safe to say that we Diabetics are naturally sweet, but what does that really mean? Well for starters, the saying, “naturally sweet”, can mean an array of things.

Most non-Diabetics will hear the term “Diabetes” and think of people who ate too much sugar or are overweight, but we all know that’s not the case. People will assume that Diabetics cannot consume any sugar or they will die, again, not the case.

Over time, we endure so many different assumptions, labels, and hurtful comments towards our Diabetes that honestly don’t feel good to hear. I’m 20 years old and have had Diabetes for 9 years and still get those comments from non-Diabetics. When I was first diagnosed, those comments didn’t affect me. Fast forward to today, I have educated myself and lived/experienced so much in my Diabetic journey to the point where now, I truly cannot tolerate hurtful assumptions people may say to me or near me. I’m not just speaking for myself. The whole Diabetic community has expressed their frustrations and experiences on dealing with people who viewed them as the stereotypical Diabetic. Some of those comments include: “oh, did you get Diabetes from eating too much sugar?”, “Diabetics can’t eat sugar.”, or “you don’t look Diabetic”. These are just some examples and trust me, I’ve heard much worse.

We are getting so close to the end for Type 1 Diabetes and living out a normal and healthy life has become so much easier and much more manageable due to all the advanced forms of technology, specialized medicine, and even just by spreading awareness and building a community.

The typical stereotypes should not determine our future or our own individual decisions. We can eat sugar. We can do whatever we put our minds to.

And we are so much more capable of doing things that we want to nowadays due to all the advancements that allow us to do so.

Diabetics work hard each day just to stay alive. I think sometimes we all can get carried away and take life for granted, but when you really think about how critical and complex Diabetes management truly is, that in itself can be the main motivator in your life to keep you going.

My point right now is that we are naturally sweet for all these reasons. We are hard-working, focused and motivated, and in it to win it (it being a cure!). We are sweet because we can not only be of an assistance to other Diabetics by creating a kind and inviting environment but at the end of the day, when you look back at all you went through that day and how you took care of yourself, good or bad, you’re simply…sweet!

So go ahead, make a change in this world, prove them wrong, eat that sugary donut or ice cream (with Insulin of course!), because, with that natural fighting spirit we Diabetics are given, we can do literally… ANYTHING!

Live well,

Dave

Interview Series: Amin Zayani, LBNN 2017 Winner

We are excited to share our interview with our Patient Entrepreneur and 2017 Lyfebulb Novo Nordisk Summit winner, Amin Zayani. As a T1D since 2006, a solar energy engineer by training, and hardware expert by trade, Amin is revolutionizing pharmaceutical care through his creation of Med Angel.

Hi Amin! Tell us a little about yourself.

I was born and raised in Tunisia, and then moved to Germany for studies. I graduated as a solar energy engineer, and then worked in Berlin for several start-ups. I was lucky to work closely with the founding teams, both in engineering and business roles. I was diagnosed with T1D in 2006, but my diagnosis was not a big deal to me, because my brother has had T1D since age three. Since his diagnosis in 1994, our family had a special relation with carb-counting, insulin, and everything that comes with it.

What drove you to start MedAngel?

I woke up one morning in August 2013 with high blood glucose. And despite injecting many corrections from several insulin pens, it wouldn’t go down. I ended up in ER that day (luckily without major complications).

 I went home with a fresh batch of insulin after a couple of hours, but I was frustrated and determined to understand the cause of the problem.

 I traced the cause to my malfunctioning refrigerator, which froze my entire stock of insulin overnight, and then defrosted it again. Unfortunately, the damage was irreversible. I was aware of insulin’s vulnerability to heat, but I never suspected it to be at risk when stored as instructed in my refrigerator. I hacked a simple solution using some electronics I had
lying around (a microcontroller, a thermometer and a buzzer) and I showed it around at local meet-ups. The feedback was overwhelmingly positive, I quickly understood that this is an overlooked problem that affects millions of people and that there was also a market opportunity. I quit my job, invested all my savings and a loan from the bank, and joined Rockstart Digital Health Accelerator in the Netherlands. MedAngel was born as an easy to use, reliable and affordable solution in early 2017. The solution consists of a wireless Bluetooth temperature sensor that is kept with insulin and communicates with an App on the phone. The App supports all types of insulin on the market in the USA and EU (plus a couple of hundred hormones and biologics), and knows the safe ranges for stored or opened meds and alerts you only when there is a real danger.

Why should people buy MedAngel?

Our mission at MedAngel is to eliminate the uncertainty about insulin’s potency. We believe that no one should ever have an insulin pen in their hand and not know if it is still good to use or not. Many of our users have one sensor with their stock in the refrigerator, and one with the insulin they carry on the go. Many of them started using it for their travels, and we noticed that a majority of users place them in cool bags or Frio pouches in summer (to make sure that the protection works well). To summarise I would say that our solution achieves the following:

1. Bringing peace of mind and reducing some the burden of living with diabetes

2. Ensuring optimal therapeutic outcomes of insulin and other drugs

3. Avoiding financial waste by giving early alarms before it is too late, or avoiding discarding medication because of doubt.

How do you feel about winning the LBNN17 award?Our team is honoured and proud to win this award, especially after competing with such high-level start-ups! We worked very hard to do the pitch, and we wanted to stand out with a unique proposition and story. I have not felt happier in my life! For me personally it feels like a well-deserved recognition after 3 years of non-stop hard work. For us as a team, it is proof that we are doing things right, and that we work well together.

What does this award mean for you and your company?

It is a major milestone for our company! It feels like everything we were doing, everything that was on hold is falling in place! Business leads, investments, projects. We were overwhelmed with the number of emails, calls and inquiries that we received in the next few days: all major pharma companies got in touch with us, people sent us their CVs because they want to work with us, VC funds from Europe and the USA. The validation, exposure and visibility that came with winning the award are priceless. Thanks again to your team and to Novo Nordisk for making it happen.

What is next for MedAngel?

Great things! Big and ambitious plans! We need first to close our fundraising round (which I hope we will announce soon), then we will focus on growing the business and scaling up. We plan on reaching more users worldwide, and keep our high user satisfaction.We are also concentrating on working with a select number of pharmaceutical companies to make their digital transformation happen, and together bring a nicer, richer user experience to all people living with chronic conditions.

 

Real Talk with Dave: My Thoughts on T1D this Past Year

A lot has happened within the last year in the Diabetic community and we are getting so close to finding a cure. I am filled with hope each and everyday as I go about my own individual duties in the Diabetic community, as so many people are doing good each day in changing the way we manage our Diabetes and spread awareness. So many are dedicating their own lives to encouraging, supporting, and helping other fellow Type 1’s one way or another.

That very aspect fills my heart with happiness as I love seeing kindness in the Diabetic community.

Within the last year, I have seen more and more faces joining the online aspect of the Diabetic community. Lots of great opportunities have come from that and have been changing Diabetes management in such a positive aspect!

As part of my contribution to the Diabetic community, my main focus is on making Diabetes look “cool” in a sense by providing fun and creative content on my Instagram account, @type1livabetic, for others to enjoy.

I try and engage others by asking Diabetes related questions, post a photo about a relatable issue or struggle in Diabetes management, etc. By doing so, I have come across so many new accounts/followers who are wanting (and striving!) to make a change and a positive impact, even if that means they post a photo everyday. And hey, that is more than enough! Just by making that effort to spread awareness through a photo is more than enough.

Along with that, a lot has changed in the Diabetic world. As it is 2017, so many new advances in technology for Diabetic care has become a reality to so many that a cure seems only a mile away! Nowadays, many use Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs), Apple Watches with Dexcom integration, Insulin Pumps, and the list goes on!

These devices haven’t always been around, which makes them pretty special and as some may like to call them, “life savers”.

I totally agree! Just by seeing that now we can view our blood sugars on our phones or watches tells us that things are only getting better. Pretty soon, there will be a medical breakthrough which will allow Diabetics to practically ditch their daily duties as a Diabetic while a very advanced, new device does all the work, and boy oh boy, what a relief that will be! Then, the only thing that will be in the works will be the real cure that will end T1D once and for all, literally!

Community has been a big deal to me lately. I have noticed that though we have family members and friends who are in constant support and are willing to help us in any way possible, if a non-Diabetic doesn’t truly know what a low or high may feel like or what it’s like to have needles become a new normal to their body every moment of every day, then they really don’t know what T1D feels like. That is why I depend so heavily on the Diabetic community for my actual Diabetic support. I seek support and understanding from those who are dealing with the exact same thing as me.

That is so comforting to know that messaging, calling, or visiting with another Diabetic for support is just a click away!

I couldn’t be more grateful for the community and all the amazing organizations that don’t leave us hanging by providing events, support groups, and other amazing activities that help connect and bring us Diabetics together, as well as stick together!

So to sum up, lots of great things have happened within the last year for us Diabetics. As we wrap up this year and start a new one, I can’t help but remain hopeful for a better tomorrow where we can finally put T1D behind us!

Live well,

Dave

The Second Annual Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Award

#LBNNAWARD17

The second Annual Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit and Award was a huge success! We just returned from a cold but sunny Copenhagen, Denmark, where 12 of the most innovative thinkers in diabetes management competed in a challenge in front of top Novo, Lyfebulb and other life sciences professionals, engaged with each other and point people at Novo Nordisk, and participated in work-shops and one-on-ones to both learn and teach.

The concept we created three years ago – patient entrepreneurship – has taken off, and what we saw last week was a true reflection of the idea that people living with disease or in close proximity of someone with the disease, can identify and solve for problems that may not be apparent to those with no connection beyond business and science. Diabetes is the first disease we have embarked on, for personal reasons, since I was diagnosed with T1D in 1989 and have been pursuing better solutions for myself and others since.

Our jury this year was strong, including top venture capitalists Shomit Gose (Managing Director ONSET Ventures) and Dr Magnus Persson (Chairman at Galecto BioTech and board professional), as well as leaders in diabetes treatment, Dr John Nolan (Special Advisor to the President at EASD) and Dr Shaukat Sadikot (President at the International Diabetes Foundation) and finally a patient representative, beautiful and smart, Vanessa Pirolo, T1D.

In my opinion, it was very difficult to judge the finalists since they ranged widely across consumer products, coding, and medical devices, across genders, age and experience levels, and I found them to fall into three categories:

1: Investable opportunities for pure VCs

2: Partnering opportunities for healthcare companies

3: Community-platforms for awareness and advocacy

The winners, Amin Zayani of MedAngel – making sure the insulin we inject is functional, Linh Le (represented by Malcolm Nason) of Bonbouton – detecting foot ulcers before they occur, and Jen Horonjeff of Savvy Coop – connecting patients with companies to solve problems, represent the three categories and we applaud them for their inspiring presentations!

As a company focused on improving the quality of life for people with chronic disease, we see all the finalists as partners in our fight, and hope to work closely with them going forward.

In addition to the top three we have to mention the fabulous and gorgeous OneDrop (led by the ultimate diabadass, Jeff Dachis, digital marketing guru), our NYC friends Matt Loper, Wellth – using behavioral economics to improve outcomes, David Weingard, Fit4D – scaling CDEs and driving toward better glucose management, and close by in Connecticut, Charlie O’Connell, FitScript – making exercise safe for everyone with diabetes. More distant, but equally strong in their passion include French entrepreneur, Laurent Nicolas and DiabNext – simple solutions to monitor glucose and dose insulin through your phone, the highly energetic Australian, Josh Wulf, Magicraft – coding for children with diabetes, Canadian Aaron Horowitz and his Jerry the Bear, Sproutel – making a diabetes diagnosis become a super power for children, Fierce Liz Sacco with her inspiring story about developing a clever solution to clean up the blood post-monitoring with DiabeticDabs, and finally Slovenian Luca Zaponcic, CarbEasy and his smart scale to simplify carb-counting.

We cannot wait to see them all take next steps, raise more funds and further their projects toward success in the market place, since that means that patients all over the world will live a little better with their diabetes!

To investors reading this note – please let us know if you want more information about any of these companies – they are in fund-raising mode and we want them to succeed and you to make money while doing good for people with diabetes.

Finally, thank you Novo Nordisk, our fabulous partner who took a chance on us last year, and has shown such spirit and common Mission in our pursuit toward reducing the burden of diabetes everyday.

Karin

Bravest Episode 020: Karin Hehenberger, Md, Phd on Becoming the Ultimate Patient-Entrepreneur

On the show today we have Dr. Karin Hehenberger. Some of you might know Dr. Hehenberger from her amazing work with her venture LyfeBulb, but for those of you who are not familiar with her, Dr. Hehenberger is a type 1 who is no longer type 1.

Dr. Hehenberger has a list of credentials and professional accomplishments that make her the ultimate multi-hyphenate. She was on the Swedish National Tennis Team, she earned her Medical Doctorate and her PhD in molecular medicine, she was a post-doc fellow at Harvard, a consultant for McKinsey & Company, has worked in big pharma and start-up biotech companies, and the list goes on and on.

What’s remarkable about her story is that she navigated all of those challenging environments, and succeeded on a large scale, with type 1 diabetes. But as the years went on, and she experienced a period of significant burnout and poor control of her health, all the complications anyone with diabetes fears, started to set in. Dr. Hehenberger ultimately found herself with significant damage to her vision, and her kidneys were failing. She was on the edge of complete physical breakdown.

Ultimately, it was her father who saved her live with an incredible gift, and then a few months later it was a donor, and a very talented transplant team in Minnesota who would provide Dr. Hehenberger with a chance to experience life without type 1 again.

Dr. Hehenberger is the ultimate patient-entrepreneur and you’ll learn through this interview that she is all in when it comes to finding and supporting the next generation of budding patient-entrepreneurs through her venture catalyst LyfeBulb. As I release this episode, Dr. Hehenberger and her team are over in Copenhagen Denmark for this year’s LyfeBulb/ Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit where they will be working with some of the best young innovators in the world of diabetes.

There’s a lot to this story and our conversation is a deep look into denial, motivation, personal drive, an individual’s love of science, and a belief that those impacted by a chronic condition should be at the center of creating ventures that will help minimize the impact of that condition on the world.

Source: Bravest

Press Contact for Lyfebulb: 
Shepard Doniger
BDCG, Inc.
561-637-5750
sdoniger@bdcginc.com

Patient Entrepreneur Amin Zayani of Med Angel BV Selected as the Winner of the 2017 Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Award

The Innovation Awards Recognize Patient Entrepreneurs for Their Innovative and Disruptive Ideas for Management of Diabetes Using Consumer, Medical Devices, or Healthcare Information Technologies

COPENHAGEN, Denmark, Nov. 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Patient Entrepreneur and Founder & CEO of Med Angel BV, Amin Zayani was named the recipient of the 2017 Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Award for his work in addressing the management of diabetes and received a grant of $25,000. Amin Zayani was selected from a group of twelve finalists (which can be found here) after dozens of Award submissions were received from 25 countries. In addition, Linh Le, represented by Malcolm Nason, of Bonbouton and Jen Horonjeff of Savvy Cooperative received second and third place in the competition, and were awarded $15,000 and $10,000 respectively. The winners were selected by an international panel of judges.

The Summit jury was comprised of Magnus Persson, MD, PhD, a board professional, Professor John Nolan, Special Advisor to the President of EASD, Shaukat Sadikot, MD, President of the International Diabetes Foundation, Shomit Ghose, Partner at Onset Ventures (and the jury Chairman), and Vanessa Pirolo, a patient representative. Mr. Ghose, states:

“Diabetes is a global health issue affecting a diverse population. The Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit brought together diverse solutions from global innovators. As a venture capitalist, it was exciting for me to see all of the disruptive solutions that came forward.”

Amin Zayani, who took first place, described his reaction at being announced the winner:

“This prize represents a lot of recognition for our company’s mission and we are raising awareness of the importance of properly storing insulin at home. When one of the world leaders in making insulin recognizes the problem as well, it consolidates our case. I’m so happy and proud, this prize motivates me to continue what I’m doing.”

The Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Summit and Award spotlights outstanding Patient Entrepreneurs’ innovative ideas to disrupt the future management of Diabetes via consumer products, medical devices, or healthcare information technologies. The twelve finalists attended the 2017 Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit November 6-8, 2017 hosted by Novo Nordisk A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark, which provided a unique opportunity for visibility and recognition in this highly competitive arena. For more information please visit Lyfebulb’s website.

Dr. Karin Hehenberger, CEO and Founder of Lyfebulb states:

“This year’s Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit in Diabetes saw an increase in number of applications from a wider range of countries than last year. The interaction with the 12 finalists proved rewarding for all parties involved, including the distinguished jury, invited guests, Novo Nordisk, and Lyfebulb leadership. We congratulate the three winners chosen by our diverse jury. We believe, however, that all of the finalists have promising futures in this space, and above all, show that their personal ‘lived experiences’ are strong value-adds to the businesses they are building. Lyfebulb’s concept of empowering patient entrepreneurs and to bridge industry with patient communities was clearly validated through this Summit.”

Senior Vice President for Novo Nordisk Device R&D Kenneth Strømdahl adds:

“Entrepreneurial spirit is fueled by great ideas and passion, and patient communities provide vital insights into how we can foster patient-driven innovation. It was a great pleasure to engage with the 12 finalists and there is no doubt that we are all working towards the same goal to ultimately defeat diabetes.”

For more information, please visit Lyfebulb’s website.

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November 08, 2017 09:14 ET | Source: Lyfebulb
COPENHAGEN, Denmark, Nov. 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Patient Entrepreneur and Founder & CEO of Med Angel BV, Amin Zayani was named the recipient of the 2017 Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Award for his work in addressing the management of diabetes and received a grant of $25,000. Amin Zayani was selected from a group of twelve finalists (which can be found here) after dozens of Award submissions were received from 25 countries. In addition, Linh Le, represented by Malcolm Nason, of Bonbouton and Jen Horonjeff of Savvy Cooperative received second and third place in the competition, and were awarded $15,000 and $10,000 respectively. The winners were selected by an international panel of judges.

The Summit jury was comprised of Magnus Persson, MD, PhD, a board professional, Professor John Nolan, Special Advisor to the President of EASD, Shaukat Sadikot, MD, President of the International Diabetes Foundation, Shomit Ghose, Partner at Onset Ventures (and the jury Chairman), and Vanessa Pirolo, a patient representative. Mr. Ghose, states:

“Diabetes is a global health issue affecting a diverse population. The Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit brought together diverse solutions from global innovators. As a venture capitalist, it was exciting for me to see all of the disruptive solutions that came forward.”

Amin Zayani, who took first place, described his reaction at being announced the winner:

“This prize represents a lot of recognition for our company’s mission and we are raising awareness of the importance of properly storing insulin at home. When one of the world leaders in making insulin recognizes the problem as well, it consolidates our case. I’m so happy and proud, this prize motivates me to continue what I’m doing.”

The Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Summit and Award spotlights outstanding Patient Entrepreneurs’ innovative ideas to disrupt the future management of Diabetes via consumer products, medical devices, or healthcare information technologies. The twelve finalists attended the 2017 Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit November 6-8, 2017 hosted by Novo Nordisk A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark, which provided a unique opportunity for visibility and recognition in this highly competitive arena. For more information please visit Lyfebulb’s website.

Dr. Karin Hehenberger, CEO and Founder of Lyfebulb states:

“This year’s Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit in Diabetes saw an increase in number of applications from a wider range of countries than last year. The interaction with the 12 finalists proved rewarding for all parties involved, including the distinguished jury, invited guests, Novo Nordisk, and Lyfebulb leadership. We congratulate the three winners chosen by our diverse jury. We believe, however, that all of the finalists have promising futures in this space, and above all, show that their personal ‘lived experiences’ are strong value-adds to the businesses they are building. Lyfebulb’s concept of empowering patient entrepreneurs and to bridge industry with patient communities was clearly validated through this Summit.”

Senior Vice President for Novo Nordisk Device R&D Kenneth Strømdahl adds:

“Entrepreneurial spirit is fueled by great ideas and passion, and patient communities provide vital insights into how we can foster patient-driven innovation. It was a great pleasure to engage with the 12 finalists and there is no doubt that we are all working towards the same goal to ultimately defeat diabetes.”

For more information, please visit Lyfebulb’s website.

About Lyfebulb

Lyfebulb is a business focused on bridging patient communities with industry, and providing a strong voice to people living with chronic disease by empowering patient entrepreneurs and patient ambassadors. See www.lyfebulb.com, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Karin Hehenberger LinkedIn, and Lyfebulb LinkedIn.

About Novo Nordisk

Novo Nordisk is a global healthcare company with more than 90 years of innovation and leadership in diabetes care. This heritage has given us experience and capabilities that also enable us to help people defeat other serious chronic conditions: haemophilia, growth disorders and obesity. Headquartered in Denmark, Novo Nordisk employs approximately 42,000 people in 77 countries and markets its products in more than 165 countries. For more information, visit novonordisk.com, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube

Source: Nasdaq Globe News Wire

Press Contact for Lyfebulb: 
Shepard Doniger
BDCG, Inc.
561-637-5750
sdoniger@bdcginc.com

New York-based Lyfebulb is helping diabetes patients become ‘patient’ entrepreneurs

Lyfebulb showcases and mentors ‘patient entrepreneurs’ – entrepreneurs who are affected by chronic diseases and are building businesses which target those suffering from chronic diseases.

Karin Hehenberger was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 1989, at an early age. Her chronic illness required her to go through kidney and pancreas transplants. With a dual perspective as a patient and a doctor, Dr Karin decided to do something to help other people impacted by chronic illnesses, to work on businesses that will help other patients.

Karin founded Lyfebulb with two close friends and colleagues, Riccardo Braglia, CEO of Helsinn, and Stephen Squinto, Venture Partner at Orbimed and Co-founder of Alexion. The idea was to build an organisation that bridges patients with industry. “After my experience as a medical doctor, healthcare executive, and Type 1 diabetic, I personally understand that there’s a gap in the development of solutions for patients and know the impact patients can have on improving solutions to their quality of care,” Dr. Karin says.

She wanted to showcase individuals who, like her, were not accepting of the role of a passive patient, but willing to take on the challenge of changing the future for themselves and others living with chronic disease. Lyfebulb calls these individuals “patient entrepreneurs” not to be confused with the meaning of ‘patience’. These people are anything but patient, but they are living with a chronic disease or closely related to someone with a chronic disease and they are not just sitting back waiting for solutions. They are out there creating products and solutions that may help them and others in the near term.

Although it is not a requirement that the founders be patients of chronic diseases, they have to be personally affected by diabetes or a chronic illness. They often have the disease themselves, other times a friend or family member is living with the disease.
Lyfebulb Entrepreneur Circle features people who have made their disease their career. They identify an issue in their lives with the disease and then they address that issue by creating a product or an entire company. At Lyfebulb, they maintain a blog and are active on social media as a way of building the community and getting valuable information to people living with chronic illness. They have hosted many events in different areas of chronic illness, including diabetes, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are informational as well as community building. They hold innovation summits with large companies where they ask patient entrepreneurs to apply, choose 10-12 finalists, and then bring them together to compete for monetary prizes and interact with a pharma leadership, VCs, and thought leaders.

“We have hosted 26 events in the three years since we started Lyfebulb in New York City, Stockholm, and Copenhagen. This year we are hosting our second annual Innovation Summit in Copenhagen, Denmark and next year, we will host another summit/award in another therapeutic area, in addition to diabetes,” adds Dr Karin on their events so far and future plans.

Lyfebulb has entered into a partnership with Novo Nordisk to grow the Lyfebulb Entrepreneur Circle and to establish the Lyfebulb–Novo Nordisk Innovation Award to recognize promising startups founded by patient entrepreneurs. The winner of the 2016 edition of the award was Brianna Wolin, CEO & Co-Founder at Find Your Ditto. Brianna has lived with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease most of her life. Find Your Ditto is the only mobile platform that connects individuals living with the same chronic illness locally for on-demand, in-person peer support to mitigate feelings of loneliness and depression. Users can find their ‘dittos’ and begin to feel like “it’s not just me.”

Lyfebulb also mentors patient entrepreneurs and they help certain companies secure funding through their network. While they do not have an incubator currently, forming a virtual one is in the pipeline. They are also contemplating on raising a venture fund called Lyfebulb Ventures, but may proceed with making specific investments into companies instead.

Source: Your Story

Real Talk with Dave: Sick Days

One of the things I hate the most about Diabetes are the sick days that come with the disease. They don’t happen everyday, and they may not happen very often, however, when they do show up at random, it can be one of the things that make us Diabetics feel like we are incapable of doing what we want to do.

I’m talking about the days in which we may wake up with a super high or low blood sugar that just drains us physically.

These sick days may not even start at the beginning of your day. It can happen at pretty much any part of the day and for some reason, that high or low that you may be experiencing is that like no other. They are not like the typical, daily highs and lows. For some reason, these bad blood sugars “hurt” in a sense and make us feel so horrible, that we practically have to put the day on hold.

This issue has been something that I have been dealing with lately and some non-Diabetics may not understand truly just how difficult these days are.

I struggle very often with waking up from a high (weather it be from over treating a low during the night, to simply having my pump site needing a change), and for some weird reason, waking up from a high physically hurts more than a high appearing throughout the day. Once I am awake and conscious of the fact that I am high, I get the worst headaches and nausea I can ever experience.

For some, waking up high has become normal and their bodies may have even gotten used to that fact, but for others, when all seems right and their numbers may be on track daily, having these unexpected bad blood sugars can ultimately determine their day. Don’t get me wrong, I know we all try our very best every moment to have good numbers, but over the years, I have met and heard of other Diabetics say how they feel “safer” in knowing that their numbers are a bit high at night, as they don’t feel lows and don’t want to not wake up in the middle of the night if needed to treat a low. I completely understand that view, however, making sure you don’t go too high is also a factor to keep in mind.

Symptoms that are a result of these “sick days” include headaches, dizziness, dry mouth, nausea, tiredness, lethargy, and the list goes on.

Each person is different and may experience their own unique symptoms, however, finding a way to cope with your own unique challenges and feelings is necessary to establish ahead of time so you can be prepared when you are surprised by a sick day. At times, you may feel the need to push through these bad days and try to make it through the day, all while hurting inside from how your Diabetes is making you feel that day, but it is necessary and simply okay to take a step back and put things off for a bit until you are back to normal. The people you encounter daily should be understanding and supportive, making it easier on you to take the day off, essentially, and restore your health until you’re up and running again. You may have to skip school, work, or even an outing with your friends, but that is just fine as you won’t be you if you’re not feeling good and you may not even enjoy it.

The days in which you experience these sick days, you may feel ashamed, down, and depressed. Don’t be, though! It is not your fault.

No one is at fault, actually, because you didn’t choose to have Diabetes and you certainly are doing whatever it takes to control your Diabetes daily and that in itself is amazing. We all make our own types of sacrifices over the years to better manage our Diabetes, so don’t sweat it. Yeah, you may feel down at the moment, but remember to get back on your feet and try again.

So if you are feeling sick one day due to any Diabetic complications, take it easy. You work hard at your Diabetes, that every now and then, a break to rest and recover is necessary.

Live well,

Dave

Oh No, I’m low!

Being a Type 1 Diabetic for almost eight years now, it’s second nature. Nothing phases me anymore, not even ignorant comments or grueling routine blood draws. As anyone reading this post who either has T1D, or is close to a T1D, knows, there becomes a point where it just becomes a part of you.

I no longer have diabetes; I am a diabetic.

This feeling of figuring I know the way the disease will manifest itself in my day to day life, can quickly shatter as soon as diabetes makes me feel weak.

Being low is never a great feeling, not before or after you down two juice boxes and half a tub of peanut butter without realizing it. Lows as a collegiate athlete are much worse. Learning to combat the shame I feel when I have a 40 mg/dl blood sugar reading half way through a two hour tennis practice, and have to sit out for twenty minutes is an uphill battle. This shame is not induced by anyone but myself, though. The feeling of sitting out when the rest of my team is out practicing, is one of the few times I feel disabled.

I often sit there, repeating thoughts in my head, such as, “You are an idiot for taking insulin before practice”, or “You are pathetic; buck up and get out there”.

However, I am not pathetic. I am not an idiot. In fact, I am someone without a full-functioning pancreas.

I am a someone who has to alter their daily life significantly because of an illness that I did not cause. On top of all of that, I do all of the other things my teammates do, and succeed as a collegiate student athlete.

So where does this shame stem? As a seasoned T1D, I put unnecessary pressure on myself to be perfect, and to get angry with myself for the lows and highs. Having many other T1D friends, I know I am not the only one who does this. These feelings of shame creep up often  during a low on an important test, or during a tennis match, where I am representing my team and university.

While I cannot say the “shameful lows” are completely gone, as I head into my final year of school and as an athlete, I can say, they have substantially lessened in my four years in college. Instead of getting angry at myself for the low blood sugar, I shifted the internal conversations to question why I’d gone low and how I could better prepare for next time I was in a similar situation.

In shifting this focus, I now see lows and highs as a learning and growth opportunity. For highs (which are usually due to adrenaline) during matches, I think of diabetes as a mental game with myself, and laugh off mistakes instead of letting the anger get to me or my blood sugar. For lows, I have tailored my diet and eating times substantially to set me up for success in the classroom and on the court.

Shifting my focus from negatively viewing the disease’s impact on my physical and mental health, to seeing T1D as a way to better understand my body, has helped my mind and my a1c.

Real Talk With Dave: Battling Blood Sugars

Over the last few weeks, I have been struggling with managing my blood sugars and I have been finding it to be very difficult and frustrating to find peace with my numbers. Having moments in your life where your Diabetes isn’t exactly where you would like it to be can have a negative effect on your blood sugars and make you realize just how much we need to push for a cure on T1D. We all have different lives that we live, making T1D somewhat of a big annoyance if one cannot handle their Diabetes effectively. Just know, it’s not your fault and time will pass where you overcome these bad moments with your numbers or whatever else T1D has to throw at you and good things will come, making you feel confident and empowered in handling your Diabetes the way you are used to.

            Every now and then, there comes a time in the lives of those living with T1D where changes come, such as numbers reacting a different way than they used to when you would eat or do something you always did, finding that you need to alter your doses or planning a bit, just to get the numbers back to the way they were.

Some may find that certain brands of Insulin don’t work the way they used to anymore, causing you to search for another brand that is just as effective as your previous Insulin before the change happened. These are just some examples that, like it or not, do happen with Diabetes, making life more stressful and overwhelming at times.

This past week, as I was driving to class, I noticed my Insulin pump site had ripped out while in the car. I had only 5 minutes to get to class and change my site out for a new one. You can only imagine the amount of stress and pressure that was on me at that time. I got to my school and parked, grabbed my emergency kit in my car, and changed my site out in about 2 minutes. Though I got to class just in time, my numbers were going sky high prior to the sight ripping out, even though I took my Insulin.

Then, on my break, I quickly checked my BG and found my blood sugar at 426 mg/dL.

My new site apparently hadn’t gone in properly and effectively, resulting in my numbers to go that high. I then tried just about anything to get some fresh insulin flowing inside of me as I still had another hour of class that afternoon. Unfortunately, my numbers continued going up pretty fast and halfway through that hour, I had to leave class early and rush home to get access to some fresh new Insulin and an all new site, which by then, my number had reached 490 mg/dL. I was alarmed, felt very sick, and was ultimately drained as I hadn’t been that high in a while.

Rest assured, all is well now, however, through that experience, I came to a point where I was feeling very unhappy with my numbers and how I was feeling most of the time, that I decided to make a change in my doses. Though I changed them, I have still been dealing with some high numbers here and there. These are the struggles we go through on a day to day basis that sometimes go unnoticed.

Diabetics are warriors that face these challenges regularly, but as we battle with our numbers and overall well being of T1D, we are here to make a difference and inspire others.

We are more than capable of turning Type One into Type None. Due to many days of feeling weak, sick, and unstable, it can be hard to enjoy life as we are in a constant battle with our numbers. It can be a constant struggle and challenge in one’s life, BUT as some like to say, we are blood sugar warriors. With constant support and encouragement from one another, as well as hard work and effort in our health, we are capable of change and well being. It just takes time (and lots of it), but at some point or another, things DO get better.

Enjoy the good times, learn from the bad, and strive to make a difference as a Diabetic as we patiently wait and push for a cure!

Live well,

Dave

Real Talk with Dave: It’s a Spooky Time for Spooky Blood Sugars!

It’s finally fall and most people are especially excited that October is here, which means Halloween time is present! Everywhere you go, there are Halloween themed decorations and pumpkin spice latte creations, making everyone excited for the holidays and the exciting festivities that come with them. Many people get into the spirit of Halloween, the costumes, the candy, and the fun times with friends, however, being a Type 1 Diabetic comes with just a few extra things to plan and prepare for.

I think it’s safe to say that us Diabetics work hard each day, so the one night where candy is the star of the show, I believe it is okay to enjoy some Halloween treats in moderation.

Planning ahead is key as you begin to make arrangements for Halloween.

I get it, Diabetes is not fun, it can be scary and have it’s ups and downs, however, it shouldn’t stop you from celebrating a fun holiday! For example, most Diabetics try and avoid unnecessary sugar throughout their day and watch out for things that can complicate their lives in terms of their blood sugar levels, BUT, if you plan on walking from door to door on the night of Halloween, you will be getting in some exercise, which may potentially drop your blood glucose levels, so go ahead and enjoy a piece of candy or two (and some insulin, of course). Don’t over do it though, because you don’t want to come back home that night or shorten your trick-or-treat experience due to severe high sugar levels and a stomach ache. That’s why, in moderation, eating a few pieces of candy throughout the night and finishing the rest of it over the course of the next few days is a better alternative in managing your numbers. Halloween is a fun-filled holiday where people go out dressed as their favorite characters and hang out with friends, eating candy all night, and T1D should not limit that, just be responsible in your choices as you decide how much candy to eat and when.

As you go from door to door, it wouldn’t hurt to have a backpack or purse with you that has all your emergency medical supplies, your blood glucometer, and some extra insulin, because you never know what could happen and not being at home with access to these supplies can be dangerous, so always prepare for the worst, just like you would at school, work, or on a vacation. Also, make sure you are walking with a group of people who know of your Diabetes and limitations, as in certain situations, them knowing can potentially save your life, say if you were to go severely low or high that night.

Always surround yourself with a trusted group or people (or at least one person) who is willing to help you out in any way possible if needed.

As for carb counting and sugar contents, most Halloween candies are familiar and of common brand names, so just be sure to check the nutrition facts on the back of the wrapper or do a quick google search on your phone for nutrition facts on the candy of your choice, this way, you can effectively and safely give yourself the right dose of Insulin needed for what you choose to eat!

In terms of costumes (that’s right, I’m discussing costumes), if you are unsure of where you may place your Insulin pump or carry your Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) if your costume is a little out of the ordinary and has no waistline or belt clip, you can always wear a strap, band, or garter underneath your costume, which provides a place to clip and secure your devices, and don’t be afraid to show off that beautiful site of yours! You can even decorate your sites for the occasion or to match your costume if you’d like!

            So don’t stress the holidays, take part in all the activities your heart desires (within reason, of course), and enjoy this life you were given! T1D has nothing on you.

Enjoy some Halloween candy responsibly, because yes, even Diabetics CAN eat candy! With smart choices and planning ahead, you can do the holidays, life, and just about anything you would have done had you not had T1D!

Live well,

Dave

A day in the life of a type-1 diabetic

It’s already been established that Diabetes is a disease that we, who have it, cannot run away from. We have to deal with it and we have to maintain control non-stop. There is no taking a break from it.

I am 24 and have been diabetic since I was 11. I have been alive with diabetes longer than without, and yet, in my head, the “normal” life is the one I had before.

I am currently treating my diabetes with insulin pump therapy (the pump is a little machine that never leaves me – it constantly injects tiny little doses, known as basal, as well as some extra insulin when needed, for meals for example, known as bolus). I use a blood glucose monitor called FreeStyle Libre, which tests my blood via a sensor on my upper arm. With this machine, I do not need to prick my fingers to draw blood (although I still often do, as the sensor readings are often less accurate than the finger-pricking ones, unfortunately), and I can check the trend of the last eight hours, which is very helpful to understand where I am going and prevent a high or a low.

My diabetes and I have a love/hate relationship. I “love” it because it taught me how to be strong, independent and proud. But I hate it because as much as it gave me strength, it gave me weakness too.

As much independence it gave, it brought me on my knees countless times, forcing me to seek support from my family. And no matter how proud I am of who I am today, it sometimes happens that I let my diabetes catch-up with me and I feel raw, deep shame. Shame for my own lack of control, or judgement, leading to a hypo or a hyper. Shame for my scars. Shame for my sensors adorning my body constantly.

But despite this hate, I try to live my life with my diabetes, not against it. I try to wear it as a badge of honour, even if my will sometimes falter. And then come the darkest times. No one is my friend and no one can understand. What a selfish way of seeing it… I have to snap out of it and remind myself that I am not a burden. We all have our battles to fight, it just so happens that mine is diabetes. But the support and love I get from my family and friends, I give back to them in their own battles (I hope so, at least).

Let me just give you an incentive of a normal day for me. I am about to write my Saturday as I lived it, but as some of you may not be familiar with some technical terms, here is a couple of numbers that might help you. When I talk about BG, I mean blood glucose or blood sugar. A low BG, or hypoglycaemia, is anything below 4.3mmol/L. Anything over 9mmol/L is a hyperglycaemia, or a high. As a diabetic, my blood glucose can go as low as 1.2mmol/L (personal lowest) and as high as 33mmol/L (again, not proud, but personal highest). When I talk about inject insulin, I write U, for units.

8am – I wake up, just minutes before my alarm. I usually like waking up before my alarm. It gives me a sense of pride – a proof that my subconscious knows my routine, that I don’t need a machine to help me wake up, that I have slept the right amount of time. But today I do not feel pride. I cannot see clearly, everything is blurry and my eyes do not adapt to the sunlight as they should. Even before feeling anything else, I know what that means: I woke up with low sugars. And true enough, when I test my sugars, the little monitor makes an unhappy sound. It blinks my number: 2.8mmol/L and it displays the pattern of my last 8 hours of sleep. I have been down for 2 hours. And I have not felt it until now. That is worrying. I’ll have to mention it to my endocrinologist during our next appointment. But I shrug it off.

The main focus right now is to treat the hypo. I reach for the candy beans I keep close to my bed, in case of emergency. While I wait for the sugar to reach my bloodstream, I mumble and grunt. This is no way to start a day. I feel weak, shaky, dizzy, my muscles ache, and I am irritable.

8;15am – Time for a check-up. But I am feeling somewhat better so I know I am going up. Beep-beep: 3.4mmol/L. Still low but I have to start moving. Work doesn’t wait. I gobble another couple  of beans and start to freshen up and dress up. I usually shower at night, because I am not a morning person and I know I’d hit the snooze button way past shower time. It works out fine today as I just lost 15 minutes lying in bed waiting to feel a tiny bit better, let alone, go into a shower where I could slip.

8:25am – It’s not been 15 minutes yet but I can’t wait. I hate running late. Beep-beep: 4.2mmol/L. That’s good enough. Like very often, I am not hungry in the morning, but this time I cannot skip breakfast. I take a slice of chocolate chip brioche out of the bag, quickly pour and drink a glass of orange juice, and leave the house, brioche in hand.

9:40am – I am at work, with time to spare. I did not miss my bus, nor my train, and it takes me only 12 min to arrive at work from the station. I ate my slice of brioche in the train, read a couple of chapters and even surfed my Facebook. I finally sit down at the back of the store, in which I work full-time. I have some 20 min to prepare for the day. I check my glucose again. I do not want to have a hypo in the middle of my shift, in front of my co-worker and customers, and I do not want to have a hyper either. I have not yet injected for the piece of brioche. I am not even sure I will need to. All depends on my sugars now. Hence the third check of the day. If I’m around 8 and it looks like I’m going high, I will need to have a bolus. But if not, then the brioche’s carbs will have helped me get out of the hypo. Beep-beep: 6.7mmol/L. Finally, a good number. Despite the bad beginning, I am now feeling relieved and ready to tackle my day.

10am – The doors are open, I let the customers in, and I note half-jokingly to myself that I should write about a day in a retail worker’s life too. We witness the weirdest things. That’d make a pretty funny article.

11:40am – I am so hungry. But I try and ignore my stomach, as well as my lovely co-worker who just brought some snacks from the store next door.

It’s ok to give in and have a snack, but if I do, I have to figure out how much carbs I’m ingesting, and really, who wants to do maths before stuffing honey- roasted cashews down one’s throat?

I’ll avoid the counter area until lunch time, meanwhile there’s plenty of stuff to do on the floor.

12:05pm – That’s it? Not even 30min have passed since I realised I was hungry… Today I will be the second one to go on break… With the breaks starting at 12:30pm and lasting 45 min, I’ll have mine at 1:15pm. Nope. I can’t wait that long. I disappear for a minute and go in the staff break-room. I reach into my bag and take my diabetes pouch out. I take the monitor to my arm and wait for the expected “beep-beep”. But not this time. This time it’s a “Beep-beep-beep” that’s ringing… It’s an alarm to remind me to change my sensor in 3 days. Great… Another $90 to cough up… I press ok, and the screen displays my glucose. 9.1mmol/L. I look into my Calorie King App to estimate the intake of carbs. [Serving size: 10 whole nuts – Total Carbs: 6g / serving]. Let’s assume I’ll eat about a hand-full, seems to me that’s about 25 nuts, makes 25g of carbs. I enter my blood glucose and my carbs intake in my pump and it does the rest of the work for me. It’s injecting 2.65U. 1.45U for the carbs and 1.2U to correct my BG, according to my own personal settings. Bless the genius minds of the scientists and medical engineers who have concocted this little gem of a machine. I press ok and feel the insulin being pushed under my skin in my belly. I hurry back on the floor. I don’t want the girls to think I’m giving myself a break at the back. That took about 5 min and even though they never complain or even seem to notice my little disappearances, I try minimising them as much as possible because I feel it’s unfair for them. I am back, and can now enjoy those hard-earned cashews.

1:15pm – My co-worker has come back from her break and it is now my turn. I hurry to the break- room, wave my machine to my arm, check the number (7.3mmol/L – perfect), take my wallet and go buy a nice, warm lunch in the food court. I opt on the spicy pumpkin soup with toast that’s smelling so good from their counter. When I bring my own lunch, that I cooked myself, I know the estimate number of carbs. Or when I buy ready-to-eat meals (yes, I do eat those too, I am not perfect), I just need to look at the nutrition info label. But today, I ask the girl who serves me if she knows what the carbs count is. She stares at me with blank eyes, then shrugs. A couple of years ago, I would feel the urge to explain my odd question. But now, I don’t care what she thinks. I take my phone out and look the information up onto the same App as before. 1 cup of soup is 16g of carbs. The soup is a big portion, I’d say 2 cups, that makes 32g. 1 slice of white bread (is my bread white or wheat? Does that make a difference? I wave it off, if there is a difference, surely it won’t be a big one) is 10g of carbs. That makes a meal of 42g of carbs. Again, I enter all this information into my pump and I’m all set. I sit down at a table and starts eating my lunch, while enjoying my book. After I am done with my meal, I set off to the break-room and look at the remaining time for my break. About 15 minutes. Good. I can relax and continue reading.

1:56pm – My break is almost over, I want to check my blood again. Yes, I know, again.

Normally when I started a day with a hypo, you can be sure a hyper will follow, as a bouncing effect.

This morning it hasn’t happened, so I’m cautious. And, you see, I am weary of hypos and hypers, especially in the workplace. I don’t know if it is just me, but I want to prove that my diabetes does not affect my abilities, and so I am very vigilant. And also, it is not really pleasant to experience. Beep-beep: 8.7mmol/L. Nothing wrong going on here. I am ready to head back to work.

4pm – The store has been quite busy for the past few hours. Late Father’s Day shoppers is my guess. While most of the time, the customers are happy to wander in the aisles, browsing, today, we do not even have time to ask them if they need assistance, they go straight to us, with a very specific book in mind. A book that we then have to find out the location of, if it is even in stock. As soon as I am done with one customer, another jumps in. I have been thirsty, so I fetch my bottle, and even though I would like to check my blood again, I hear a bell at the counter, which means I am needed there. I hurry back, sipping my water while making my way to the front of the store. My sugars will have to wait.

6:12pm – It is closing time. Finally. The girls and I are exhausted. The customers sometimes seem like leeches. They are in hurry, very demanding and feel entitled to pristine customer service, and the want it now. The day has been long and draining. I close up the store and head off to the station. I have a dinner with friends outside of town and I don’t want to be the last one arriving. While walking, I reach for my monitor and check my glucose:14.6mmol/L. Uh-oh… that piece of bread did seem quite large and it was soaking in butter… Plus the stress of the day, I guess. But all that is guess-work. So uncertain. In defeat, I enter my blood glucose level into my pump and it tells me to inject, which I do.

The train ride is about an hour, I will have gone down by then, hopefully.

7:20pm – I’ve arrived and first thing I do after kissing hello to my friends and offering my help, is to check again: 10.2mmol/L. Gowing down, good. If it hadn’t, then I would have had to check my insulin line, maybe even change it… Not what you want to do during a friend’s dinner party. I enjoy the appetizers, wine and conversation, keeping track of what I put in my mouth. I will need to remember everything for the meal bolus, when the rest of the guests have arrived and the food done cooking. I play with their son, a 4-year-old bundle of joy. As we play, he notices my line, and tries tugging on it. “What’s that?” I try and explain to him that I am sick and this is my medication. He looks at me, dubious. “No you’re not!” Again, I try to explain that I am sick inside of my tummy, and I show him where the line goes in. I want him to know that there is nothing to fear about me. Kids are very observant and they are smarter than we give them credit for. If I explain to him, He will get it, even if not in details. But if I try to hide my tummy, and change the subject, he will remember. Very delicately, I let him touch the pump and the cannula site. And then I let him wave my monitor to my arm to test my blood. “I am your doctor!” He exclaims happily. The incident is past. The mum is proud of her son’s reaction. I am proud of mine.

9pm – I start feeling weak… The food has just been taken out of the oven. We are a bunch of Europeans and Brazilians, we eat late. Which would have been fine, if I had not assumed they would want to eat early to accommodate their boy’s schedule. But I did, and I pressed OK for the bolus to correct my previous hyper. I wanted to take a proactive approach and think ahead, but it backfired on me. Now, I test my blood: 3.4 mmol/L. I have to drink sugar and water, while my friend looks on, worried and apologetic. I don’t want her to feel bad, so I smile and try as best as I can to reassure her. “I’m Ok” I mouth to her from across the table. I know that the next few moments are going to be critical, if I want to avoid doing what I call the yoyo effect, which is bouncing up and down (my blood sugars, not actually me) for the next, I don’t know… 12 hours? So I refill on sugar, and start eating my meal hoping it’ll make my glucose steadily go up, until it is safe for me to inject for the meal. The meal itself is pretty lean. Probably about 40g all in all, counting the puff pastry crust, the gravy and side of pasta. But after 10 minutes, I am still feeling tired. I check my sugars and they are actually getting lower 3.0mmol/L. That’s when I get frustrated and worried. Why can’t I enjoy a nice dinner with friends?

I almost want to just let myself stay on high next time. Wouldn’t that be easier? I don’t really feel the high until it is too high…

But deep down, I know that is a very dangerous road, and I do not want to venture down it ever again. I drink my sugary water. I know I look pale and I am very quiet, and my eye socket are grey and I look like a ghost of myself only a few minutes ago. But I do not want to deal with the stares right now. I ignore the stares. After a few more minutes, I feel better. Even if my body hasn’t moved from that chair, it feels like I am sitting down at the table after vanishing somewhere. I join the conversation again, laugh at jokes (weakly at first but then with my usual gusto), and happily sip my wine. All is forgotten. All is good.

12:30pm – Most of the guests have gone home. My brother has had some wine too and doesn’t want to drive home. He will be sleeping over. I try to decide if I should too. I don’t drive and I usually don’t mind the train… But it is Saturday night and I don’t want to spend an hour to get home, in a train smelling of alcohol and sweat. Our friends have a spare bedroom for me too, so I decide I’ll sleep over too, even if I was craving my own bed tonight. Tonight, was not a wild night but I did have some wine and the alcohol does bring my sugars down. So, guess what, I test myself again. Beep-beep: 11.3mmol/L. That is probably the after-effect of my dinner hypo. I decide not to inject, because I fear to go down again because of the wine. I’m hoping by tomorrow, I’ll have come down by myself (and of course thanks to my pump injecting my basal overnight). I am tired and a bit frustrated too. I don’t want to spend one more minute of my night thinking about my diabetes. Obviously, I make mistakes whether I over-think it or not. I keep my bag close to the bed. In there I have my phone, my monitor and a pack of candy beans – in case of an unwelcome overnight hypo. It’s sleep time now. We will see. Tomorrow is another day…

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