Real Talk With Dave: Diabetes is NOT a Diet

When first diagnosed, it may seem as though you are on a diet that is going to restrict you from eating what you once loved. But that is not the case what so ever! On the day when Diabetes comes crashing into your life and presents itself as the worst thing yet, one may feel confused as to what this disease is like and how certain foods will affect you and your daily routine.

When I was first diagnosed back in 2008, I remember feeling scared to eat because what was once an easy thing to do completely turned into a complicated challenge in which I had to measure all my food, eat a balanced meal with the proper nutrients, and calculate the carb and insulin ratios. Before I was diagnosed, I remember having the biggest sweet tooth out there and when the day of my diagnosis came, I felt like that was instantly taken away from me, all to realize that wasn’t the case, at all.

I know that after going to the Endocrinologist for years, they tend to lecture you and make you feel that you should always be eating the proper foods, but every now and then, a cheat day is necessary in order to live a happy (and healthy) lifestyle. If not, burnout can happen from trying to eat all the right foods all the time. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t care for your diet and watch what you eat, but remember, Type 1 Diabetes is most commonly found in children, teens, and young adults who every now and then just need a cheat day or some time to not feel deprived of the foods they once ate freely. Yes, you do need to be as healthy as possible to avoid Diabetic complications later in life, you just need to find balance between your diet and exercise pattern. When you do, you can eat what you like, along with a healthy diet that is best of you.

I went through a stage in my life in which I chose the path of a crash diet in which I would not even touch foods that were high in sugar or where unhealthy and processed. I was a little too careful with my diet and was missing the big picture. I remember at one point, I had it with this diet and missed eating the foods that I used to eat. After some reconsideration, I though to myself how I can still choose to live a happy and healthy lifestyle, all while eating “junk food” in moderation from time to time, as well as not worrying too much on how my numbers were and trying to make them perfect. That wasn’t living.

And I wanted to live, not for the future, but for the present.

I wanted to enjoy each day without living in fear of trying to eat the right foods and have, what I thought were, perfect blood sugars. Yeah I was healthy, but I wasn’t all that happy.

Every now and then you come to a point where you will have to decide what type of lifestyle you truly want, depending on your personality and current situation. Diabetes can be tough when you try and over plan and set limits to yourself. Finding a common balance between what you eat and how it affects you can help when trying to regulate your Diabetes as a whole. It is a lot of work and there will be periods of time in which it is mostly trial and error by simply seeing what works best with your blood sugars, but when you finally feel as though you have figured it out, it will truly feel amazing! You can do it all, eat what you want, not restrict yourself all the time, but just eat in moderation the foods that may not be the stereotypical diet for a Diabetic.

So go ahead, eat that ice cream. And enjoy it. Because even with T1D, you CAN eat ice cream.

Live well,

Dave

5 Healthy Green Vegetables to Speed Your Weight Loss Efforts

Are you looking for a quick and completely natural solution to shedding those unwanted pounds and keeping a healthy body weight?

Turns out there’s something you can eat in large quantities that makes you feel full, gives you energy, keeps you emotionally stable and, best of all, helps you to lose weight – green vegetables!

Not a huge fan of eating vegetables? No problem, just toss some vegetables along with a fruit (banana, mango and strawberry work best) into a blender, and enjoy a delicious <a href=”https://easyhealthysmoothie.com/how-to-lose-weight-with-smoothies-guide/”>weight loss friendly smoothie</a>!

Here are our favorite vegetable alternatives that work great in a smoothie:
<ol>
<li><strong>Watercress</strong></li>
</ol>
Watercress is graded a <a href=”https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2014/13_0390.htm”>solid 100%</a> on the nutrition scale, by academic researchers together with the US Department of Agriculture.

Why? First of all, it has more calcium than milk, more vitamin C than oranges, more protein than most animal products, and contains all of the top 17 essential nutrients.

Watercress also contains alpha-lipoic acid. This is an antioxidant that researchers believe can fight off diabetes, which is closely connected with overweight issues.

In fact, Watercress in Germany is a prescribed medication to halt the progression of the nerve damage <a href=”https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10595592″>caused by diabetes</a>.​

As it is relatively strong and bitter tasting, you may want to consume it in a smoothie while blending in some sweet fruit and vegetables like beets, cucumber, and peaches. Also add Stevia as a natural sweetener.
<ol start=”2″>
<li><strong>Peas</strong></li>
</ol>
Peas contain more protein than steak and eggs. ​Protein triggers the release of the fat burning hormone called glucagon, which scientists have demonstrated leads to <a href=”https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19930006″>fat loss</a>, even in diabetics.

If you want your body to burn fat for energy quicker, or in other words to speed up your metabolism, protein-rich foods are the perfect solution.

Your body works much harder and requires much more energy to break down the proteins than it does to process fats and carbs. This hard word is the fat burning we’re after.

In addition, protein also helps you to build muscles, whose maintenance also requires energy and, thus, fat to be burned.

​Protein also makes you feel full for longer, so you can avoid snacking unnecessary calories.

In smoothies, peas lend a great thickness and creaminess to the smoothie when cooked first. They work well with watery vegetables like lettuce and spinach.
<ol start=”3″>
<li><strong>Spinach</strong></li>
</ol>
In a recent study, Swedish researchers gave women spinach extract to eat in the mornings, and they lost <a href=”https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24993695″>30% more weight</a> than their peers! They said that they did not feel hungry or tempted by the mouthwatering foods that they usually ate.

Scientists believe that arginine, found in spinach, can increase your muscle mass. Because muscles are so big and heavy, your body must burn a lot of fat just to maintain them. This fat burning happens even when you are asleep.​

Given its mild taste, it works beautifully with any vegetables and fruits. Apparently David Beckham loves his spinach because it is rich in fiber.​
<ol start=”4″>
<li><strong>Stevia</strong></li>
</ol>
You can get it in the shops as powder or drops, but it is actually a plant with green leaves you can cultivate in your backyard. The leaves are sweeter than sugar and is the perfect solution to sweeten a smoothie without adding calories.

A recent study demonstrated that people who used Stevia ate 300 calories less per day than those who ate sugar while <a href=”https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2900484/”>feeling equally full</a>.

Add half a leaf to any smoothie you think needs sugar, especially to the bitter ones. It will neutralize the bitterness, much as sugar neutralizes the bitterness of coffee.
<ol start=”5″>
<li><strong>Green Tea</strong></li>
</ol>
You may think of it as a beverage rather than a green vegetable, but with its green leaves, a vegetable is precisely what it is.

The main ingredient in Green Tea, called EGCG, has the most research behind it of all the fat burners.

It promotes the breakdown of fat into energy and it blocks the creation of new fat cells. Moreover, it tackles other weight gain mechanisms by improving good cholesterol and <a href=”https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3948786/”>combatting diabetes</a>.​

As a result, this is one of the best liquids you can use as a liquid base for your smoothies, and it goes along great with stevia for an extra sweet smoothie.​

<hr />

Based on: <a href=”https://easyhealthysmoothie.com/healthy-green-vegetables-speed-fat-loss/”>29 Healthy Green Vegetables that Actually Speed Fat Loss</a>

For more recipes and smoothie ideas follow Dan’s <a href=”https://www.pinterest.com/easyhlsmoothie/”>Pinterest</a>.

Can we solve food related addictions by retraining our gut to crave healthy food?

Food is part of life – we cannot survive without eating. But for those with addictions or complex relationships with food, that presents a problem. Food is intimately a part of family events, cultural and religious holidays, and for many, enjoying a good meal is what makes them happiest

Living with diabetes means having to inject insulin, take oral drugs and monitor blood sugar levels carefully. However, for all types of diabetes, food plays an important role in the control of blood sugar and the amount of insulin needed to cover a meal. For these individuals, food is no longer just the nutrition they need to survive or a joyous moment in their lives, but a carefully assessed ingredient in the overall treatment program that is diabetes.

Many cultures show love through food, and when one says no to love, one can be faced with consequences, despite the reason. Someone who controls their food intake can seem overly uptight, not fun, and not a happy-go-lucky person. The reactions when you decline something unhealthy due to your disease can be strong, especially if the person serving the food does not know that you have a medical condition.

What is even worse is when the very food that is supposed to make you feel stronger and happier becomes your poison. and you just cannot indulge in even the smallest portions. This is how an eating disorder is born. For a person with diabetes, 200+ extra decisions have to be made daily, but there are still problems that can arise, even if all these decisions were made correctly. One controllable action is to restrict the food, eliminate any temptations and reduce the risk of failure- because failure means near and long term consequences such as passing out due to hypos, or losing your vision and kidney function due to highs.

I restricted my carb intake for several years to the extent that I could lower my insulin injections to a bare minimum and I never had to worry about going low or going high! If you do not eat carbs, and you do not inject large amounts of insulin, blood sugars are stable, but your body suffers due to actual lack of energy. That is not yet diabulimia, but it causes weight loss and an enormous fixation on food.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which an individual gives themselves less insulin than they need for the purpose of weight loss.

The transition to full blown diabulimia is dangerous and often happens as a “natural” progression of restriction – when the temptations of food are too great, and you start having some carbs, but you still do not inject insulin! Now, you are still avoiding the lows, but the highs are a constant presence and that is BAD for the long term.

The reverse is when people eat whatever they want, despite their diabetes and keep their blood sugars under control by overdosing on insulin. This may lead to “double diabetes,” which implies added insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to the already diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Unfortunately, this is becoming a more common phenomenon due to the ease at which one can dose insulin through pumps or pens and the “politically correct” attitude of not restricting diets of especially young patients, of some doctors and parents.

So how do we avoid diabulimia and double diabetes? I believe in training the body to enjoy healthy but nutritious foods. As I mentioned, food is essential to life and it also can be a pleasure in life. The gut-brain relationship is becoming more well understood and I truly believe that if the gut gets exposed to low sugar, low carb but high fiber, lean protein and “good” fat ingredients, the bugs in our gut (microbiome) will start craving more of the same and the brain will feel good and satiated on foods that are not triggers for binging, glucose excursions and feelings of shame. The research area focusing on the microbiome is very interesting to me. The bugs that live in our guts seem to determine what foods we crave, whether we are thin or overweight and may even be part of the cause for autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes.

Our call to action are several-fold:

1: Stop judging people for keeping healthy diets – that is a sign of strength, discipline and a will to survive

2: Be aware of the signs of diabulimia: people with insulin-dependent diabetes with very poor glucose control who when pushed will admit to under-dosing insulin to stay thin

3: Do not encourage double diabetes: when diagnosed with T1D, we cannot eat exactly what we want – that is a fact and an opportunity to be healthier than your peers

3: Learn what foods are good for you and what your systems likes. Stick to this diet for a period of time and you will learn to enjoy it, not just because you want to, but the gut-brain system will be re-trained and you will start dreaming about grilled salmon with mushrooms instead of pasta with cream sauce!

The Ultimate Guide to Vegan Protein Sources

“Where do you get your protein?”

It is a question all too common for anyone who has tried to reduce their consumption of animal products. Likewise, it is one of the first concerns one may have after learning about the cruelty and environmental impact of the factory farming industry, or the health risks excess animal products can cause.The idea that a vegan diet is not adequate in protein, even for very active individuals, is a myth that many people believe. However, this is far from the truth.

There are many reasons why this myth is perpetrated, but here are four big ones:

The Incomplete Protein Myth

  1. The “incomplete protein myth” states that you need to combine certain plant foods to get all of the essential amino acids that your body needs. The reality is that ALL plant foods are complete proteins, but some may have higher amounts of certain amino acids than others. As long as your diet is somewhat varied, combining specific foods during meals is unnecessary. Even the creator of the “protein combining” theory has retracted their opinion on this subject.

Uncertainty As to Which Plant Foods are High in Protein

  1. People may think they need animal products to get protein simply because they don’t know how much protein plant foods actually contain. Here is a short list of accessible and easy to prepare foods that illustrate how easy it is to meet daily protein requirements as a vegetarian:
    • Soybeans dried: 100g = 40g protein
    • Lentils: 100g dried = 26g protein
    • Split Peas: 100g dried = 25g protein
    • Oats: 100g dried = 17g protein 
      The list goes on!


 

Weak Anecdotal Evidence

  1. Since a very low percentage of the population are vegan, one may know few, if any, athletes who eat purely vegetarian. Most who are into strength and exercise have been told they need to a lot of animal protein, and they pass this information onto others. This can even include doctors or professional athletes. However, anecdotal claims are not facts, and can be easily skewed or bias. That’s why it is important to be informed of actual facts from properly conducted research rather than individual claims.

Deceptive Marketing Tactics

  1. Food companies are constantly promoting their products as a “good source of protein”. This is a bit of a misnomer since “protein deficiency” is nearly impossible if you are consuming your daily recommended amount of calories. Medical protein deficiency, known as kwashiorkor, is very rare and mainly found in starving populations. Foods such as potatoes or whole wheat pasta are adequate sources of protein that would add up quickly if you consumed 2000 calories of it (we don’t recommend this, though). The most current scientific knowledge on nutrient needs suggest a very active 6 feet tall 180lb man only needs 65g of protein a day. You can check your requirements here.

If you’re interested in learning more about vegan protein sources, check out the full article located at: https://thrivecuisine.com/lifestyle/ultimate-guide-vegan-protein

 

Vegetarian Eggs Benedict: The Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Cookbook

This hearty vegetarian dish will provide you with ample protein and carbohydrates to help you make it through the morning. If you’re not sensitive to dairy, you can also add mozzarella cheese as a topping.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 zucchini (courgette), diced
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1 cup (160 g) frozen chopped spinach
  • ¼ cup (25 g) pitted black olives, sliced
  • ½ teaspoon
  • dried rosemary
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 gluten-free English muffins, split in half
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Serves 2

  1. Heat the oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the zucchini (courgette), tomato, spinach, olives, and rosemary, lightly season with salt and pepper, and sauté for about 5 minutes until the zucchini and tomato are softened and the spinach is heated through.
  1. Meanwhile, poach the eggs. Fill a skillet (frying pan) with water and bring the water to a low boil. Break the eggs directly into the simmering water and cook for about 4 minutes until the yolk is as you desire.
  1. While the eggs are poaching, toast the muffins in a toaster.
  1. To assemble, place two muffin halves on each plate and top each muffin half with some sautéed vegetables and a poached egg.

Per serving: 489 kcals, 27.7 g fat (1.2 g saturates), 30.3 g carbohydrate (6.9 g sugars), 25.1 g protein, 7.4 g fiber, 2.2 g salt


Recipe from The Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Cookbook by Dr. Karin M Hehenberger, MD, PhD (CICO Books, $19.95) Photography © CICO Books

14 Health Benefits of Avocado, Proven by Science (+ 5 Delicious Avocado Recipes)

The average avocado is nutrient dense, delicious, and will clock in at about 140 calories. With this comes 14 grams of fat – roughly 70 percent of the calorie content. In these calories are an incredible balance of nearly twenty vitamins and minerals. Infused alongside these nutrients are many antioxidants – and the fat content of avocado is monounsaturated, meaning that it helps your body balance its intake of other fats.

Avocados can help your body with a wide range of ailments. Aside from being able to clear up vitamin and mineral deficiencies, which can cause a host of problems on their own, avocados can help prevent aging from oxidation (helping you live longer and be more active), improve immune function, manage your blood fat content, eliminate cholesterol, improve digestion, and more.

Avocados have been the subject of intense study and research. Their speculated benefits have helped people for centuries. Science has recently been able to find truth to the legacy behind the avocado’s medical usage in history. Mexico, Chile, and other Central and South American cultures have used the fruit in medicinal preparations and health remedies for many years.

avocado with tomato and cilantro ingredients chopped

 Here are 14 health benefits of avocado, as backed by science.

1. Avocado is a very good source of lots of vitamins
2. Avocados beat bananas in terms of potassium content
3. Avocado helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels
4. Avocados are full of monounsaturated fatty acids
5. Avocados help your eyesight
6. Avocados can prevent osteoporosis
7. Avocados have a great fiber content
8. Avocados can fight against cancer
9. Avocados can reduce depression
10. Avocados improve digestion and detoxification
11. Avocados have a synergistic mixture of antioxidants
12. Avocados can help your skin stay young and healthy
13. Avocados are helpful for people trying to lose weight
14. Avocado helps bolster the gut’s intestinal flora

To read more in-depth about each of the listed benefits below, and to learn some delicious avocado recipes, click here.


Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram (@Lyfebulb) and Twitter (@Lyfebulb) and use the hashtag #EatWell to show us your healthy recipes!

Seared Scottish Salmon + NYC Restaurant Week!

We are halfway into NYC Restaurant Week Winter 2017! We hope all of the New York locals have been enjoying the participating restaurants and #EatingWell. If you didn’t already know, one of our Lyfebulb Favorites is Brasserie Ruhlmann located in Rockefeller Center. Chef Laurent Tourondel is incredible, the food is exquisite, and the atmosphere is cozy and chic.

Until February 10th, Brasserie Ruhlmann will be offering a delicious, three-course prix-fixe menu in honor of Restaurant Week. At $42, this deal cannot be beat, and you won’t want to miss it!

They have kindly shared the recipe for their delicious seared Scottish salmon with wheat berry salad so that we could share it with you! Enjoy!

 Seared Scottish Salmon With Wheat Berry Salad

salmon

Salad Ingredients:

1cup Wheat berry
1cup Quinoa
1pc Avocado (diced)
1cup Butternut squash diced-.4 ounces small diced and blanched
½ cup Dried cranberries
¼ cup Candied orange
1 cup Kale
Champagne vinaigrette-4 tablespoons
1Tbs Chives
1Tbs Parsley

Wheat Berry Instructions:

Wheat berry’s- soaks them overnight to soften up. Place them in a small saucepot submerged in water with 3 springs of thyme. Cook on a medium-low heat until tender without making them burst. Let cool in water for 10 minutes after cook time. Strain and use.

Champagne vinaigrette- yields ¾ cups

Dijon mustard- 2 tablespoons
Champagne vinegar= ¼ cup
Lemon juice-2 tablespoons
Honey- 1 tablespoon
EVO- ½ cup
Thyme-1 tablespoon
Salt
Pepper

Vinaigrette Instructions:

  1. In a medium mixing bowl place mustard, vinegar, salt, pepper, thyme, honey and whisk together.
  2. Slowly whisk in the olive oil until the dressing is emulsified.

Candy Orange

Small dice 2 whole oranges and blanch 5 times in cold to hot water. On the final blanch with cold water add one cup of sugar and reduce until orange is sweet.

Add a piece of seared Scottish salmon and enjoy!


Make sure to follow us on Instagram (@Lyfebulb) and tag us in your delicious and healthy photos of restaurant week!

10 Benefits of Blueberries – Backed by Science (and 4 Delicious Blueberry Recipes)

Blueberries are an amazing fruit, both in terms of flavor and their incredible nutritional profile. They’re jam-packed with antioxidants – polyphenols, catechins, flavonols – along with lots of essential vitamins and nutrients.

Blueberries are actually rated at a 9,621 on the ORAC scale. The ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) measures the efficacy of a certain food or herb on preventing oxidation. This makes them one of the highest scoring foods in terms of antioxidants in the entire world.

blueberries-1

Here are 10 Benefits of Blueberries, as backed by science.

1. Blueberries can fight against aging
2. Blueberries protect you from neurodegenerative disease
3. Blueberries can help fight cancer!
4. Blueberries have more antioxidants than any other food
5. Blueberries can reverse DNA damage
6. Blueberries can help increase your body’s insulin sensitivity.
7. Blueberries are a vast source of cardiovascular benefits
8. Blueberries have been shown to make your brain function better
9. Blueberries have a significant impact on blood sugar
10. Blueberries can help your eyes function better

To read more in-depth about each of the listed benefits above, and to learn four delicious blueberry recipes, click here. 

Don’t forget to tag us on Instagram and Twitter (@Lyfebulb) and use the hashtag #EatWell to show us your healthy recipes! 

To contribute a post to Lyfebulb please e-mail contact@lyfebulb.com

Mother of Pearl, East Village

If you are planning a fun dinner out with friends, the options in Manhattan are endless. If you are planning a fun dinner out with vegan friends, your options become a little more limited. Luckily, we have found one of the best places in Manhattan for a great vegan and vegetarian meal. Mother of Pearl, located in the East Village, is a new Lyfebulb Favorite for its deliciously healthy vegetable-centric menu.

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The aesthetic in the restaurant is chic and fun. It is decorated like a tiki bar, and the drink menu boasts tropical drinks. Their most popular – deemed the most Instagrammable cocktail of 2016 – is the Shark Eye. It is a tasty mix of bourbon, rye, passion fruit, lemon, maraschino, dry curacao, and tiki bitters, and is served in a glass in the design of a shark. As the server presents you the drink, they splash a bit of red syrup at the top, replicating a bloody shark bite.

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The menu is Hawaiian-inspired and made for sharing. The servers do a fantastic job of spacing out the meal by bringing out two plates at a time. You absolutely must try the fried guacamole! I would argue it is the best thing on the menu! Other phenomenal dishes include the apple and sweet potato poke (a great vegetarian take on a tuna or salmon poke), the butternut squash dumplings, the glass noodles with wild mushroom and Romanesco, and the blistered shishito peppers.

Overall a great atmosphere to get a healthy yet delicious vegan or vegetarian meal! We hope you get a chance to check it out!

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mop2

Spirulina Bowl Recipe

I love using spirulina as an additional source of protein in my diet, not to mention it contains a multitude of benefits. According to draxe.com, just one 3-gram serving of spirulina contains:

  • 60% protein and an excellent source of vitamins A, K1, K2, B12 and iron, manganese and chromium.
  • A rich source of health-giving phytonutrients such as carotenoids, GLA, SOD and phycocyanin.
  • 2800% more beta-carotene than carrots.
  • 3900% more iron than spinach!

The best part about this meal is that I have the versatility of making it in a smoothie or a bowl based on my preference for the morning!

spirulina

Ingredients:
1 banana
1 tsp spirulina
1 tbsp hemp seeds
1/4 pineapple
6 oz of coconut or nut milk

Toppings:
1 tbsp. chia seeds
1 tbsp. hemp seeds
Handful of pineapple
Handful of Almonds

Directions:

  • Add the banana, pineapple, spirulina, unsweetened coconut or nut milk and hemp seeds, to a blender. Blend until smooth, adding extra milk as needed to create your preferred consistency.
  • Pour the spirulina mixture into a bowl and top with sliced fruit, chia and hemp seeds, or any toppings you prefer.
  • If you prefer to make a smoothie, pour the mixture into a to-go cup.

ENJOY!

Pan Seared Cod With Ginger Lime Broth

Today marks the last day of National Diabetes Awareness Month, which means it its your last chance to drop by both Le Colonial and Brasserie Ruhlmann to indulge in our tasty, curated pix-fixe menu! A percentage of the proceeds from this menu will help us stop childhood obesity, prevent type 2 diabetes, and improve eating habits for children locally.

Courtesy of Le Colonial, please enjoy this recipe for their exquisite pan seared cod with a ginger lime broth.

img_5320

Pan Seared Cod With Ginger Lime Broth (Serves 6)

INGREDIENTS:

BROTH

  • 2 stalks lemongrass
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 4 pieces fresh ginger, each 2 inches long
  • 1 Thai chile, halved lengthwise

FISH

  • 3 pounds Cod fillet
  • ½ cup finely chopped cilantro stems
  • ½ cup finely minced lemongrass (about 2 stalks)
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped Thai chiles
  • 2¼ teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2¼ teaspoons kosher salt
  • Juice of 1 to 2 limes
  • Fish sauce to taste
  • Cilantro, for garnish
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for garnish
  • Fleur de sel, for garnishDIRECTIONS:
  1. To make the broth, trim the lemongrass, leaving only the bottom 5 to 6 inches of the stalks, and peel away the outer layers, leaving only the tender stalks. Bruise the lemongrass by smashing it with a small pot or the dull side of a cleaver. In a medium saucepan over high heat down to a simmer and simmer for 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, cut the cod into 6 equal pieces and set aside. In a small bowl, combine the cilantro stems, lemongrass, olive oil, chiles, garlic, and salt and stir to form a paste. Spread evenly over the tops of the cod fillets.
  3. In a very hot pan, cook the fish until firm to the touch, about 4 minutes per inch of thickness. Just before serving, stir the lime juice and fish sauce to taste into the broth. Place each piece of fish in a bowl and pour ½ cup of the broth around the fish. Garnish with cilantro, a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil, and a sprinkle of fleur de sel.

ENJOY!

Bittersweet Chocolate Cake

Still thinking about what to contribute to tomorrow’s Thanksgiving feast? We’ve got you covered with Le Colonial’s Bittersweet Chocolate Cake. This is the perfect amount of sweet at the end of a filling savory meal. Just make sure you leave some space! ‘Tis the season to indulge (a little) after all.
Also, it’s still National Diabetes Awareness Month, which means you still have time to drop by Le Colonial and Brasserie Ruhlmann to check out our curated and healthy prix-fixe menu, perfect for when you’re tired of cooking and need to get back on your healthy grind.
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Bittersweet Chocolate Cake
INGREDIENTS:
  • 6 tablespoons stick butter or margarine
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate (61%)
  • 1/3 cup fat-free milk
  • 1/3 cup sugar-free apricot preserves or apricot spreadable fruit
  • 2 teaspoons instant coffee crystals
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1-1/2 cups Equal Spoonful or Granulated*
  • 3 egg whites
  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 oz of Frangelico liqueur * May substitute 36 packets Equal sweetener
INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. For Torte, heat 6 tablespoons butter, 4 ounces dark chocolate, milk, preserves and coffee crystals in small saucepan, whisking frequently until chocolate is almost melted.
  2. Remove pan from heat; continue whisking until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth.
  3. Whisk in egg yolk and vanilla.
  4. Add Equal and Frangelico, whisking until smooth.
  5. Lightly grease bottom of an 8-inch round cake pan and line with parchment or waxed paper.
  6. Beat egg whites and cream of tartar to stiff peaks in large bowl.
  7. Fold chocolate mixture into egg whites; fold in combined flour and salt.
  8. Pour cake batter into pan.
  9. Bake in preheated 350 F oven 20 to 25 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Do not over bake.
  10. Carefully loosen side of cake from pan with small sharp knife, which will keep cake from cracking as it cools.
  11. Cool cake completely in pan on wire rack. Cover and refrigerate 1 to 2 hours or until chilled.
  12. Remove cake from pan and place on serving plate.
  13. Garnish top of cake with dollop of crème fraiche, fresh raspberries and fresh mint, if desired.
  14. Cut cake into wedges.

ENJOY!

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