Is Halo Top Ice Cream Actually Healthy?

I can confirm that Halo Top ice cream does indeed taste amazing.

After hearing hype for months about this low-calorie, high-protein “healthy” ice cream, I finally caved and bought a pint of their Black Cherry. I devoured it in minutes and was amazed at how much it tasted like traditional ice cream. If I went to a scoop shoppe and someone served me a bowl of Halo Top, I wouldn’t think twice. I would think it was some pretty great ice cream.

But there’s a common saying in the nutrition world—if it’s too good to be true, it probably is. Just because a product’s low in calories doesn’t necessarily mean it’s healthy. Heck, zero-calorie diet soda has its own set of issues. So, is Halo Top ice cream actually healthy? Here’s your answer.

Getting The Facts Straight

Halo Top Ice Cream
Photo via Halo Top’s official Facebook page

Before we dive into the ingredients in Halo Top, let’s discuss its nutrition facts.

In short, they’re spectacular—at least compared to the nutrition facts for traditional ice cream. Halo Top is currently available in 17 flavors. Each flavor falls in the range of 240-360 calories per pint. Let’s focus on the chocolate variety, since it’s fairly simple.

One pint of chocolate Halo Top ice cream contains:

280 calories, 10 grams of fat, 4 grams of saturated fat, 160 mg of cholesterol, 440 mg of sodium, 48 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of fiber, 20 grams of sugar, 20 grams of protein, 40% DV calcium, 16% DV iron.

Now, let’s compare that to one the most popular traditional ice cream brands in the world—Häagen-Dazs. The nutrition facts for one pint of chocolate Häagen-Dazs ice cream:

1,040 calories, 68 grams of fat, 40 grams of saturated fat, 360 mg of cholesterol, 180 mg of sodium, 88 grams of carbohydrate, 4 grams of fiber, 76 grams of sugar, 20 grams of protein, 32% DV calcium, 32% DV iron.

There’s really no contest—Halo Top blows traditional ice cream out of the water in almost every important nutritional category (especially for those concerned with weight management). The calories, fat, saturated fat and sugar totals for Halo Top are a fraction of what’s inside traditional ice cream. Halo Top does this while being just as high in fiber and protein as the traditional brands (if not more so). It’s still ice cream, so it can’t replace veggies, fruit, whole grains, etc. in your diet. But you’ll be hard-pressed to find a delicious dessert with more impressive nutrition facts than Halo Top.

The next question is how the heck do they do it?

Ingenious Ingredients

Ice Cream
One reason Halo Top is able to keep their calorie count and sugar totals so low is because, unlike traditional ice cream manufacturers, they actually use a trio of sweeteners in their product.

The most prominent is erythritol, an all-natural sugar alcohol that looks and tastes like sugar yet contains just 0.24 calories per gram. The second most prominent is organic cane sugar—which is basically a fancy way of saying plain ol’ sugar. Sugar contains 4 calories per gram. A pint of Halo Top contains 20 grams of sugar, so 80 of those calories can be directly attributed to its sugar content. The third sweetener is stevia, a plant native to Paraguay that’s long been used as a low-calorie natural sweetener. It contains no calories and is roughly 250 to 300 times the sweetness of sugar.

Let’s crunch the cumulative calorie numbers for these sweeteners:

  • Stevia contains no…

Why Everything We Know About Salt May NOT Be Wrong

A recent New York Times column offered us this provocative headline: Why Everything We Know About Salt May Be Wrong. Presumably that means- it may be right, too. Hence, my counter-headline.

I think what we know mostly is right. Here’s what I think we know:

Too much salt is bad for us. That one is almost tautological, since if it weren’t bad for us, it wouldn’t be too much.

Most of us consume too much salt. Most of the salt we consume- roughly 80%- is processed into foods we didn’t prepare ourselves. Eat less of those processed foods- especially hyper-processed foods, processed meats, and fast food- and more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, lentils, unsalted nuts and seeds – and you’ll be better off for many reasons both related and unrelated to salt. Prepare meals at home from wholesome ingredients when possible and you’ll be better off. Drink plain water preferentially when thirsty- and you’ll be better off again. That’s what I think we know, and I think it’s all correct. If you like to get your punch lines and move on, our work here is done.

For the rest of you:

What we seem not to know about salt is the ideal intake level, and in particular, variations in that level based on age, health status, and genetics, among other factors. But we have long known that sodium is an essential nutrient, that we all need some, and that it’s possible to consume too much or too little. Debate about where best to draw the dividing line, and in particular whether it should be drawn in different places for different populations, is more a matter of refinement than refutation, evolution rather than revolution. It’s how science is supposed to advance.

The source of the new provocation presented to us in the Times is two research papers recently published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, one involving mice, the other ten male cosmonauts in a simulated space environment. If that sounds like a somewhat dubious start to a dismissal of decades of research involving actual human beings, in much larger numbers, and subject to such pesky nuances as living in earth-like conditions, I’m inclined to agree. Mice and cosmonauts may teach us interesting new things about salt, but they are unlikely to reveal that everything learned to date is wrong.

Looking at the studies, they did no such thing. As acknowledged by the Times reporter, the papers are rather dense, enumerating a great many measures in recondite detail. For our purposes here, the gist will do.

The investigators found that both the ten healthy men in their simulated space station, and C57/BL6 mice are good at conserving levels of body water across a range of sodium intake. Complex hormonal fluctuations, some directly in response to diet and some part of underlying body rhythms, allowed for marked variation in the excretion of sodium (i.e., its removal in urine) without corresponding changes in urine volume. We have long known of the kidneys’ ability to concentrate or dilute urine over a wide but finite range, and these findings fit comfortably within that expanse of understanding.

Translating their own findings into succinct take-away messages, the researchers suggest that, in mice, “the kidneys, liver, and skeletal muscle form a physiological-regulatory network for extracellular volume control…” In plain English, the kidneys and other organs in the body work together, under the influence of various hormones,…

This 5-Ingredient Blueberry Zucchini Smoothie is a Creamy, Low-Sugar Superstar

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Smoothies will (hopefully) never go out of style, but what goes in them will. These days, the smoothie ingredient du jour isn’t an unpronounceable herbal powder, exotic fruit, or Amazonian super berry – it’s a humble vegetable that can be found in the grocery store year round. Here’s how to game change your smoothie with this five-ingredient (and low-sugar) blueberry, coconut, and zucchini recipe.

Yes, zucchini.

zucchini smoothie

Secret Smoothie Star: Zucchini

Known to grow like weeds in the summertime, zucchini is a type of summer squash with impressive nutrient properties. These vegetables, also known as courgettes, are low in calories and glycemic value, yet high in fiber and water content.

They’re also bursting with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals including B vitamins like folate, vitamin C, potassium, manganese, and phosphorus.

The trick to using zucchini in smoothies is to first cut and freeze the vegetable. Although there are a million and one uses for fresh zucchini, frozen zucchini is ideal in creating thick smoothies filled with substance.

zucchini smoothie

Zucchini Smoothie Ingredients

Unlike using frozen bananas to thicken a smoothie, frozen zucchini works like magic to provide delicious and creamy texture once blended. If you are looking for a smoothie lower in sugar, or simply cannot tolerate bananas, adding frozen zucchini should be…

Just One Bite of this Vegan Chocolate Caramel Bar Will Make You Feel Divine

Vegan Chocolate Caramel Bar
Image via Minimalist Baker

Golden gooey caramel is encased in rich layers of dark chocolate, combining to create the perfect dessert. With only five ingredients, this dairy-free vegan chocolate caramel bar couldn’t be any easier to make!

This chocolate recipe uses our vegan caramel sauce for its sweet and chewy center. The key ingredient in vegan caramel is Medjool dates. Medjool dates are not only naturally sweet but also have the perfect gooey texture for making caramel.

Chocolate Caramel Bar Nutrition

Medjool dates are also an ingredient you won’t feel guilty about eating. Medjool dates are an excellent source of many minerals and vitamins. Particularly, they are rich in potassium, magnesium, vitamin B6, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin K, vitamin A, and zinc. Dates are also a great source of fiber which will help sustain you and prevent blood sugar levels from rising.

The dark chocolate in this recipe is also healthy, especially…

You Can’t ‘Beet’ the Secret Ingredient in These Gluten-Free Vegan Chocolate Cupcakes

Vegan Gluten-Free Chocolate Cupcakes Recipe
iStock/esseffe

Gluten-free and vegan chocolate cupcakes no longer only exists in your dreams. They’re happening – right here, right now. What makes these cupcakes so cake-like and moist is the addition of beets, which does the job that animal-based products like milk, butter, and eggs are often called in to do. The beets don’t make the cupcakes taste like beet–instead, its presence magnifies the deep, earthy flavors of the chocolate. Enjoy!

Chocolate cupcakes are supposed to be decadent, but what if they were low-key vegan and gluten-free too? Win, win, and win.

  • For the cupcakes:
  • 1/2 cup almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup coconut nectar
  • 1 cup roasted beet puree
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 3/4 cup gluten-free flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Dash of cayenne pepper
  • For the frosting:
  • 12 ounces coconut milk (chilled in the fridge)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut nectar…

Vegan Rice Krispie Treats are a Drool Worthy Makeover of Your Childhood Fave

Vegan Rice Krispie Treats Recipe
iStock/bhofack2

Rice Krispie treats are reminiscent of childhood snacking. But they weren’t as wholesome as they tasted. Sure, they were cereal based, but they were smothered in sugary marshmallows and butter, so they were more of a sugar rush than anything else. Even so, it’s hard not to crave Rice Krispie treats, even as an adult. Luckily, with a few tweaks, these yummy treats can take a deliciously healthy turn, so you can indulge in a childhood favorite (but with the metabolism of an adult).

Rice Krispie Treats: The Better Way

These vegan Rice Krispie treats feature quinoa, nut butter, seeds, and coconut, and get lightly sweetened with brown rice syrup.

Original Rice Krispie treats call for the Kellogg’s cereal. Naturally, the cereal’s main ingredient is rice. However, it’s the second ingredient on the list that makes a seemingly harmless cereal lose its charm: sugar. And for those with gluten sensitivities, take notice: Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereal contains malt.

To avoid packing in sugar and gluten when you can easily avoid it, purchase a gluten-free puffed brown rice. I used Arrowhead Mills’ version for this recipe.

Meanwhile, these treats are sweetened with brown rice syrup. Like most high-calorie sweeteners, brown rice syrup must be used in moderation and cannot be considered fully “healthy” just because it’s derived from brown rice. However, brown rice syrup contains no…

This Is Why Your Pancakes Never Come Out Fluffy

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    We’re not saying you need to turn your kitchen into a science lab, especially before 9 a.m., but it pays to remember that there is some chemistry going on when you combine one of pancakes’ dry ingredients (baking powder) with the wet ingredients. Baking powder contains baking soda, (code name: sodium bicarbonate) and a dry acid (cream of tartar or sodium aluminum sulfate). When you add milk and egg to it, the ingredients react and form bubbles of carbon dioxide, and those bubbles are what give pancakes their height. To get the most bang from your baking powder’s buck, says Joy Wilson, whose new book is Joy the Baker Over Easy, make sure your baking powder is new. Not-so-fresh powder isn’t as effective and won’t give your cakes as nice a boost. She replenishes her supply every two months, or so (and uses the old stuff to brighten her laundry).

  • VDex/iStock

    If there’s…

Good Trip Coffee Co. Unveils New Line of Ready-to-Brew Craft Cold Brews

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With the weather heating up, your coffee routine is about to get colder.

Good Trip Coffee Co., a Denver-based specialty coffee company, has introduced a new line of Cold Brew Coffees available online in six varieties. Launching into the booming cold brew category, Good Trip Coffee Co. stands out with ethical sourcing, eye-catching packaging, and one of the only ready-to-brew cold brew products on the market.

Their compostable Brew Bag, called Brew Bags, contain signature recipes for making batches of craft cold brew coffee at home without special equipment.

“Compared to bottled cold brews at the grocery store, making cold brew at home is fresher, more flavorful, often healthier, and tailored to you,” said Angela Oehlerking, co-founder of Good Trip Coffee Co. “Our cold brew recipes are made with exceptional coffees and whole, organic ingredients, free of chemical flavorings and sugars. You get fresh, full-flavored, naturally sweet cold brew, in flavors that are truly unique– think café-inspired cold brew mixology, served straight from your fridge.”

The company is especially proud of their coffee origins, and is committed to sourcing exclusively from women-owned cooperatives through partnerships with Vega…

This 5-Ingredient Whole30 Burger Is Perfect For Clean Eating

Think that burgers aren’t part of the Whole30 program? Guess again! This clean and crave-worthy burger recipe is the perfect high-protein post-workout supper — each five-ingredient burger offers a whopping 46 grams of protein per serving. In addition to removing sugar, dairy, alcohol, and legumes, the Whole30 eliminates all grains from your diet, so you won’t be serving up your patty on a traditional bun. Instead, opt for one of these vegetable bun recipes that keep the nutritional impact high and the carb count low.

Whole30 Burger Recipe
Whole30 Burger Recipe
  1. 1 pound ground meat (chilled in freezer for 15 minutes)
  2. 1 teaspoon salt
  3. 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  4. 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder
  5. 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. In large mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Form into 3 equal-sized patties. Chill in the freezer for 15 minutes.
  3. Transfer the patties to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper if desired and roast in the oven until the internal temperature reaches 145°F, about 15 minutes.

For the eggplant buns: Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with foil. Slice one…

Five-ingredient recipes are irresistible but in pursuit of simple, you could miss sensational

Melissa Joulwan's Tiki Dogs recipe contains five ingredients – plus a few more.
Melissa Joulwan’s Tiki Dogs recipe contains five ingredients – plus a few more.

The lure of the 5-ingredient recipe seems irresistible. Short list means simple, right? With a possible three out of five already in your pantry. That single recipe subcategory accounts for a lot of scrolling through the websites of All Recipes, Eating Well, Good Housekeeping and Rachael Ray, Southern Living, Food Network — you name it.

I am scratching my head about this, though, because I see 5-ingredient recipes that should have asterisks. They are the culinary equivalent of fake news. With notable exceptions, the recipes don’t count water, basic seasonings, oil. Why?

I am looking at a “5-ingredient” recipe for Simple Roast Chicken with Garlic and Lemon at JustATaste.com: the bird, a lemon, butter, rosemary sprigs, garlic. Except any cook worth her salt and pepper knows what’s missing from that lineup. The S&P are in the directions, however. I have the “Quick-Shop-and-Prep 5 Ingredient Baking” book from a couple years back, and its Spiced Chess Pie calls for 13 ingredients. Milk, cornmeal and ground allspice are in boldface, signaling to those who read the foreword that those items need to be purchased; the premise of the book relies on your stock of flour, sugar, butter, ice water, eggs, vanilla extract, cinnamon, ground ginger, salt and nutmeg.

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post
This recipe for Brussels Sprouts Pasta with Whole-Grain Mustard has five ingredients – plus a few more.

The 5-ingredient phenomenon makes me wonder what home cooks really want when they type the phrase into their search fields.

“It feels like a scam, a little,” says Suzanne Rafer, executive editor and director of cookbook publishing for Workman. “I’m not a believer in limiting . . . . If it’s going to take six or seven or eight ingredients, so be it. Our deal is, no matter how many you put in, you want it to taste good in the end.”

Not a scam for everyone, perhaps. There is cooking for sustenance, and there is cooking for satisfaction. Overlap is desirable, but often, someone who has to get weeknight meals on the table will look at the clock, do the math and try to reduce the effort one way or another.

The 5-ingredient mode is hardly a stretch for drinks, fruit-and-yogurt desserts, sides. Seasonal produce at its peak doesn’t need bells and whistles or magical transformation. Keeping main-dish recipes “ingredient-simple,” on the other hand, typically relies on using very good components, or it can mean a missed opportunity to enhance flavours.

“People are looking for quicker and easier shortcuts all the time,” says Lisa Ekus, the force behind her eponymous literary agency, which launched Ronni Lundy’s well-received “Victuals” last year. “But you can’t have cheap – meaning economical – and fast and good. Something’s got to give.”

What often gives is a pronouncement of “delicious.” Or the complexity that multiple and complementary spices can bring. Or the control over sodium or fat in the shortcut, store-bought products the recipe calls for, such as a pasta sauce, marinade or frozen pie dough. A short list doesn’t necessarily translate to quick or uncomplicated: Think slow cooker or sous vide or a range of required knife skills.

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post
This dairy-free, spoonbread-type side dish is called “porkkanalaatikko” in Finnish, which translates to “carrot bake.”

Ekus echoes Rafer’s bottom line: “The question in the end is, is it good? Rozanne Gold is one of the few who did it really well.”

Yes, she did. The New York chef’s “Recipes 1-2-3” won a James Beard award in 1996 and forecast a two-decade trend. (Fun fact: It gave rise to the Minimalist column in the New York Times food section, which Gold had to pass on writing because she was revamping the Windows on the World menu at the time.)

She followed up with another eight books in the “1-2-3” vein that were translated into several languages. Her Mahogany Short Ribs in WaPo Food’s Recipe Finder continue to be a revelation for readers every time we happen to mention it in a Free Range chat. But none of those recipes – including the ribs – listed water, salt and pepper as ingredients.

“The idea of ingredients you can count on the fingers of one hand has to do with cooks not being intimidated,” says Gold, now 63 and working on her master’s in poetry. “It’s code.” Her 3-ingredient recipes were, in part, a reaction to an era of “pile-up” on restaurant plates that masked true flavours, she says, as well as a personal challenge to exploit an ingredient to the max – an exploration of all the ways, say, asparagus can taste in raw and cooked forms.

What matters is how the ingredients interact, Gold says. “There needs to be some experience and knowledge” in that guiding hand, and she is heartened that “it’s the mettle of a chef to cook more simply these days.” She recently produced a collection of balanced, “incredibly complex” (in flavour) 5-ingredient recipes for Cooking Light that did not count the water, oil, salt and pepper used. Would “9-Ingredient Recipes!” sound as appealing?

Which brings me to the accompanying recipes. All of them contain 5 ingredients – plus a few more. None of them are complicated; some are downright quirky. Each offers flavours that are true to their ingredients. If you like even one or two of the dishes, the lesson might be: Look beyond the sheer numbers of ingredients, with an eye on the total sum.

SALTED CARDAMOM DRINKING CHOCOLATE

 Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post
Deb Lindsey for The Washington PostSalted Cardamom Drinking Chocolate.

As the recipe’s author says, the challenge here is to find a salt that will land on the surface of your drink without sinking or dissolving. A flaked salt works best in this surprisingly dairy-free beverage.
What’s the difference between hot cocoa and a drinking chocolate? Hot cocoa is made with cocoa powder, and the latter is made with whole chocolate as well, which contains both cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Drinking chocolate typically tastes much richer as a result.
Adapted from “Bitterman’s Craft Salt Cooking: The Single Ingredient That Transforms All Your Favorite Foods and Recipes,” by Mark Bitterman (Andrews McMeel, 2016).

One 13.5-oz or 14-oz can coconut milk (not shaken, not low-fat)
3 cups (750 mL) water
1/4 cup (50 mL) sugar
1 tbsp (15 mL) cardamom pods, cracked
1/2 cup (125 mL) unsweetened cocoa powder (do not use Dutch-process)
8 oz bittersweet chocolate (at least 60 per cent cacao), broken into pieces
6 pinches flaked salt (see headnote)

1. Use a spoon to skim the cream from the top of the opened can of coconut milk and place it in a liquid measuring cup. Add enough of the liquid left in the can to yield 1 full cup. Reserve what’s left for another use, if desired.
2. Combine the water, sugar and cracked cardamom pods in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Once it comes to a boil, cook for 1 minute, then remove it from the heat and let it steep for 5 minutes.
3. Use a slotted spoon or small strainer to find and discard the cardamom pods, then stir the cocoa powder into the saucepan. Place over medium…

Cutting Carbs To Get Healthy + Lose Weight

When you are looking to get healthier, one of the most effective strategies is to start cutting carbs from your diet. In fact, most of today’s popular diet trends like the Atkins or paleo diet call for just that. Read on to find out why cutting carbs to lose weight could be the best choice to successfully reach your weight loss goals.

How Carbs Hinder Your Diet

In today’s modern society, most of us pack our daily meals with pasta bowls and freshly baked loaves. They make cheap and convenient meals that suit all taste buds.

The problem is, our modern diets are having a detrimental effect on our society. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 66% of Americans are overweight, 33% are obese, and those numbers are continuously rising each year.

It’s clear from these results that our current grain-filled diets are not the way forward if we want to live fit and healthy lives. Grains are made from carbohydrates which are broken down into glucose (sugar) in the body. This glucose should be used as energy. However, any excess glucose is instead stored as fat.

When your diet is packed with high glycemic grain foods and sugar, your body is continually in fat storage mode. This means your body never has the opportunity to use your stored body fat as fuel. These stored triglycerides are normally found around the waist. So if you’d like to reduce your waistline, you can start by reducing your refined carbohydrate intake.

Although the idea of cutting out carbs completely from your diet may seem drastic, there’s a lot of research supporting this type of change. Numerous studies have shown that switching to a ketogenic (zero sugar) diet can actually have positive results on a number of diseases, even in cancer patients.

Which Carbs to Cut

When we talk about cutting carbs there are four main types of food to avoid.

  • Bread and Baked Foods

If you want to be healthy, bread and bakery foods are the first things you need to cut from your diet. These kinds of foods will usually have the strongest effect on your blood sugar, therefore, increasing the production of insulin, the hormone responsible for fat storage.

  • Wheat Pasta

Pasta that is made from wheat is another culprit of spiking fat-storing insulin. Filling up on a big bowl of pasta in the evening is the quickest way to pile on the pounds.

  • White Rice

Although rice doesn’t have the same gluten issues as wheat, it does raise your blood sugar enough to promote fat storage, especially if eaten regularly. Believe it or not, Japanese sumo wrestlers have bowl after bowl of white rice in order to fatten up. Unless you want to look like them, it’s best to cut down on rice or at least switch to brown rice for an occasional treat which is a healthier alternative.

  • Potatoes

If you’re looking to get healthy and lose weight, it’s a good idea to avoid potatoes for a while. This is because they have one of the strongest effects on blood glucose levels of any vegetable. Although good quality steamed organic potatoes are filled with healthy essential nutrients, most people get their potatoes in the form of french fries or chips, which are most definitely to be avoided.

Which Carbs Can You Keep?

Like most things in life, not all carbs are created equal. Although you should remove all refined carbs from your diet if possible, many high- fiber fruits and vegetables are a natural source of carbohydrates.

The fact is, when you cut back on grains and sugar and start getting your carbohydrates from high-fiber vegetables, your body will naturally begin accessing its stored fat as fuel. Simply changing your fuel source makes getting healthy (and losing weight) a much simpler process.

Ideally, you want to be reducing your daily carbohydrate intake to around 50 to 80 grams per day. Doing so will give your body the opportunity to utilize stored fat you have accumulated. Without any other changes to your diet or exercise regime, you will be on the right track for weight loss.

Conclusion

When looking to start a healthier lifestyle and lose weight and keep it off long term, adjusting your meals to no longer center around carbohydrates is the way to go.

Packing your plate with healthy protein from organic sources like turkey, chicken or eggs, accompanied by a mix of flavorsome veggies like pumpkin, bok choy, eggplant, and kale is a great way get the most flavor and nutrition from your food.

As let’s face it, how much flavor does a bowl of plain white rice offer anyway?

No, It’s NOT Cheaper To Make Your Own Almond Milk. We Did The Math.

bhofack2 via Getty Images

Almond milk is ridiculously easy to make. It only requires two ingredients ― almonds and water ― so there are few excuses not to make your own. It’s clear that making it homemade will give you a simpler product; store-bought brands include ingredients such as potassium citrate, sunflower lecithin and gellan gum. But going the homemade route offers economic benefits, as well.

You’ll read on forums that making your own is more cost effective than buying it at the store, but no one ever provides any clear-cut math online ― so I set out to do it for all of us.

I looked at three brands ― Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods and Silk ― and compared the cost of the almonds that it would take to make almond milk vs. the cost of pre-made almond milk.

I picked up a pound of raw, unsalted almonds at my local grocery store for $9.99 (they were on sale from $10.99). I used the recipe from The Kitchn to make the milk. I took a cup of almonds ― which weighed a little under 6 ounces ― and soaked them in water for two days. I blended the almonds with two cups of water until the whole almonds were reduced to a…

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