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Lyfestories

The Highs and Lows of Diabetes

Diabetes is not easy. This is not news to anyone who suffers from this disease, or is close to someone who has Type-1 Diabetes. This life is full of highs and lows.

After being diagnosed at the age of 4, I knew my life would forever change. I vividly remember shortly after I was diagnosed, my babysitter at the time giving me a shot in my stomach. I remember tears streaming down my face as I crutched onto the sides of the chair experiencing a pain that unfortunately would become my new normal.

As a diabetic, we all have those memories that can’t seem to escape our daily reality, both highs and lows.

The day we were diagnosed, a bad hypo that resulted in using a glucagon, or an extreme high blood sugar that led to DKA. How about the moment when you had to leave a friends house because your pump site failed and you didn’t bring extras, sitting and asking the question, “why me?”

When I had initially started my diabetes Instagram, I was at a low point in my diabetes. I was going through another bout of burnout, and I felt like this disease was taking over my life. I needed to make a change; I needed to get out of this low.

I began documenting my every day with this disease. I’ll be the first to admit that I do not have a spectacular A1c. I fall victim to blood sugars in the 300’s because I forgot to bolus for that cookie I had at lunch. I eat just about everything in my sight when my blood sugar hits 50. I’m not perfect, and neither is this disease. It is important to be transparent and realistic about this disease. We must remember that even though it feels like we experience these highs and lows alone, we are not alone. It is so important to have a good support system to help us through our lows, and cheer us on during our high moments (unless our blood sugar is 300, then please give us some water).

Despite dealing with many lows, I’ve also experienced many highs. My family grew closer and became very involved with my diabetes. I gained many friends both diabetic and non-diabetic. I was able to attend Camp Needlepoint, work with recently diagnosed children and their families, and use my own experiences to advocate and educate. Through diabetes, I’ve become a more compassionate, and empathetic person. My true passion is to help people, and I have diabetes to thank for that. It’s given me the tools to help others; a helping hand, listening ears, open arms for those who feel hopeless or lost. My mission is to continue to help others and also use this disease to inspire change. One of my biggest mottos is “everything happens for a reason.”

Although I’ve had many low moments, diabetes has given me the opportunity to experience many positives.

I’m thankful for those who continue to support me, and for the numerous opportunities that I’m able to take advantage of.

Diabetes is not easy. There are many highs and lows that we face as diabetics. However, even in your lowest lows, know that there are also sweeter moments ahead.

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