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Lyfestories

Lyfestories: Jessica Proto’s Breast Cancer Journey

It was the spring of 2017, around March. I was lying in my bed thinking that it had been a while since I did my last breast self-examination. I started to check my left breast and I could quickly feel a small lump there. I checked both breasts and under my arms, no lumps any other places. I asked my boyfriend to check if he could feel it, and he did. I immediately went online and googled “lump in breast”, which led me to several places that explained that a tumor would be hard and very firm, and not easy to move. Since my lump didn’t have those characteristics, I thought that probably it was just a fat cyst, so I waited another month before I checked it again. The second time I checked it I could still feel it; it had the same size, but just to be sure I wanted my doctor to feel it. He sent me to a clinic to take some tests of it. Unfortunately the results came back positive. Me, a 27-year-old girl, had breast cancer.

I think I was in shock at first. I managed to tell my mum that I had some cell alterations, while I told my sister and my brother that I had cancer. Because of my age they wanted me to take another test, just to make sure that it actually was cancer. The second time I got the answer to my result it was easier for me to tell my family and friends that it was, in fact, cancer. I always thought that cancer was something I probably would get when I got old, and it’s still weird for me to think about it.

My lump was small and I started off with surgery the 18th of august 2017. They removed the lump, analyzed it and the tissue around it and found two more tiny lumps. I had to have another surgery to make sure they removed everything, and then started chemotherapy in November. I consider chemo to be my toughest friend. One of those friends that constantly tells you the truth because they want what’s best for you, even if it hurts you a little bit. Chemo hurts my cells, makes my body ache and tired, but it is for my very best. My treatment journey is not over yet, I’ve still got a few months left, and then I can look back at this as a hard chapter of my life.

I am one of the lucky ones and that is why I’ve always tried to stay positive. I know that I’m surviving this so I usually don’t feel that I have any reason to be sad. I do have a bad day now and then, tired of the whole thing and just want to get back to my “normal” life. I miss my long hair and I don’t feel very feminine anymore. But, my hair will grow back, and I will get my “normal” life back. I also found it soothing to share my story with others. It makes me so happy if I can manage to change just one person’s life. I also would like women to open up their eyes and be more aware of this illness. I know a lot of women who started to check themselves at home after finding out about me. I do it every two-three months, and that is why I’m lucky to survive this. My message to you out there, men and women, is: If you are afraid something is wrong or you are not sure how to do a self-examination and need help, call your doctor. It could really save your life like it did to me.

Keep smiling, and stay positive. Life is good.

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