Learn details of the Advances in Diabetic Shoes Market Forecast and Segments, 2016-2026

Diabetic shoes also known as therapeutic shoes are specifically designed and developed for diabetic patients to minimize the risk of various skin related problems in diabetics. The basic objective of diabetic footwear is to prevent difficulties which can comprises of ulcers, strain, or amputations for patients with diabetics. The diabetic footwear must be prescribed by physician. The utilization of prescribed diabetic shoes by patients suffering from various diabetic complications which include improper circulation of lower limbs and peripheral neuropathy has proven successful treatment in preventing and curing various foot ulcers, which can ultimately lead to foot and toe related problems. Thus, wearing the suitable diabetic shoes provides diabetic patients a substantially enhanced results with their diseases and thus recovers their whole quality of life. Besides this, medically prescribed diabetic footwear can also decreases the high cost of care related with diabetic foot ulcers and amputations. As per the International Diabetic Federation, a total of 387 Mn people had diabetes all over the world in 2016 and a total of 4.9 Mn deaths were caused by diabetes in the same year. The demand for diabetic shoes have observed an upliftment over the past few year which has strengthened the growth of diabetic shoes market all across the globe. The global diabetic food market is likely to grow at a stupendous CAGR over the next ten years from 2016-2026.

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Global Diabetic Shoes: Market Segmentation

The Global Diabetic Shoes market is segmented on the basis of consumer group such as men and women. The global diabetic shoes market is also divided…

The buzzer that can save diabetics from crippling injuries: A new hand-held device can help doctors detect nerve damage

A British doctor has developed a hand-held buzzer that could reduce the number of ulcers and limb amputations in people with diabetes.

The device, which is the shape and size of a key fob, uses vibration technology similar to that used in mobile phones to test sensation in patients’ feet.

Preliminary research suggests it can provide early warning of nerve damage which, if left untreated, can lead to serious wounds and limb amputation.

A British doctor has developed a hand-held buzzer that could reduce the number of ulcers and limb amputations in people with diabetes
A British doctor has developed a hand-held buzzer that could reduce the number of ulcers and limb amputations in people with diabetes

Up to 50 per cent of diabetes patients have some form of nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy.

It’s thought that over the years, uncontrolled high blood sugar levels damage the walls of tiny blood vessels that supply the nerves, especially in the legs.

This can lead to symptoms such as loss of sensation and tingling. Patients feel little pain, so any injuries can go unnoticed and may worsen and become infected.

One of the first tests for diabetic neuropathy relies on a crude form of vibration technology — a tuning fork — to check the…

Study finds AR helps reduce phantom limb pain in people with amputations

For people who have had an amputation, the phantom pain they experience in the missing limbs is as real as any other pain. However, treating pain at a source that is no longer there has long baffled scientists, and many existing therapies, including the use of implantable nerve stimulators or medications, offer no relief for many phantom pain sufferers.

But a new study shows augmented reality may be a viable option to treat this puzzling phenomenon. Through a mix of myoelectric sensors, artificial intelligence and virtual reality, patients are able to visualize the arm as real again, thus allowing them to reactivate areas of the brain that were used before and, somehow, reducing chronic pain.

At the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, a clinical trial using machine learning and augmented reality alleviated a significant level of phantom limb pain in 14 patients with amputated arms. Patients reported having no relief with any other treatments, but after 12 sessions with the AR system saw a reduction in pain by approximately 50 percent.

“We selected the most difficult cases from several clinics,” Dr. Max Ortiz Catalan, who developed the AR system, said in a statement. “We wanted to focus on patients with chronic phantom limb pain who had not responded to any treatments. Four of the patients were constantly medicated, and the others were not receiving any treatment at all because nothing they tried had helped them. They had been experiencing phantom limb pain for an average…

Diabetic Shoes Market Analysis and Segments 2016-2026

Health-care-56

Diabetic shoes also known as therapeutic shoes are specifically designed and developed for diabetic patients to minimize the risk of various skin related problems in diabetics. The basic objective of diabetic footwear is to prevent difficulties which can comprises of ulcers, strain, or amputations for patients with diabetics. The diabetic footwear must be prescribed by physician. The utilization of prescribed diabetic shoes by patients suffering from various diabetic complications which include improper circulation of lower limbs and peripheral neuropathy has proven successful treatment in preventing and curing various foot ulcers, which can ultimately lead to foot and toe related problems. Thus, wearing the suitable diabetic shoes provides diabetic patients a substantially enhanced results with their diseases and thus recovers their whole quality of life. Besides this, medically prescribed diabetic footwear can also decreases the high cost of care related with diabetic foot ulcers and amputations. As per the International Diabetic Federation, a total of 387 Mn people had diabetes all over the world in 2016 and a total of 4.9 Mn deaths were caused by diabetes in the same year. The demand for diabetic shoes have observed an upliftment over the past few year which has strengthened the growth of diabetic shoes market all across the globe. The global diabetic food market is likely to grow at a stupendous CAGR over the next ten years from 2016-2026.

Global Diabetic Shoes: Market Segmentation

The Global Diabetic Shoes market is segmented on the basis of consumer group such as men and women. The global diabetic shoes market is also divided by retail distribution which includes store based and non-store based. The…

Type 2 diabetes UPDATE: Incurable linked condition Charcot foot can result in amputation

Type 2 diabetes: There is no cure for Charcot foot
Type 2 diabetes: There is no cure for Charcot foot

Short-term complications of Type 2 diabetes include hypoglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis, while long-term complications include how diabetes affects sufferers eyes, heart, kidneys, and nerves and feet.

When the condition affects the feet – a condition called neuropathy – the nerves can be severely damaged and can in severe cases result in amputation.

Diabetes can cause neuropathy as a result of high blood glucose levels damaging the small blood vessels supplying the nerves, which can prevents essential nutrients reaching the nerves.

Neuropathy can affect the sensory nerves – resulting in numbness and the inability to feel pain, which can lead people to avoid injuries which could become infected.

The nerve fibres are then damaged or disappear, which can have damaging consequences for the patient.

Type 2 diabetes: Charcot foot is a debilitating bone condition
Type 2 diabetes: Charcot foot is a debilitating bone condition
People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups.
People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups.

People with diabetes that have severely damaged nerves can develop a debilitating bone condition called Charcot foot, where the bones and joints in the foot are weakened.

Charcot foot can happens when an…

Amputation for Diabetes: What You Need to Know

MNT Knowledge Center

People with diabetes have high blood sugar, which can lead to serious complications if untreated.

Two serious complications are nerve damage and peripheral artery disease. These can lead to the need for amputation below the knee.

Man drinks water
Excessive thirst may be a symptom of type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, refers to a group of metabolic diseases where the body cannot produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both.

Insulin is a hormone that helps the body to absorb blood sugar into the cells. In the cells, it is used for energy.

The main types of diabetes are type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Another type, gestational diabetes, develops only during pregnancy. This type puts women at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the immune system mistakenly destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes can no longer produce insulin.

Treatment is usually through insulin injections. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. It develops when the body’s cells become resistant to insulin. This means the cells cannot get enough blood sugar needed for energy.

Obesity is believed to be the greatest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Cells develop insulin resistance in response to excess fatty tissue. Other risk factors include family history, lack of exercise, and a history of prediabetes or gestational diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes can sometimes be reversed or slowed with lifestyle changes.

Gestational diabetes is a form of type 2 diabetes that starts during pregnancy. It usually stops once the baby is delivered. Around 9 percent of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes.

Many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the same. The most common symptoms are excessive thirst and frequent urination. Other symptoms common to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are:

Anyone experiencing any of the above symptoms should seek a health provider. Diabetes is diagnosed mainly through testing blood sugar levels.

Diabetes is a serious disease, and it can affect nearly every part of the body. People with diabetes have a greater risk of heart disease and stroke. People with diabetes are two times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than people without the disease.

Here are some other complications of diabetes:

Diabetes complications related to amputation

Peripheral artery disease

Peripheral artery disease occurs when the blood vessels become narrow. The narrowing occurs because the walls of the arteries have fatty deposits or plaque on them. People who have plaques in their arteries have atherosclerosis. This narrowing can lead to blocked arteries, which is peripheral artery disease.

Woman takes blood sugar test
Maintaining blood sugar may be critical in reducing the risk of complications with diabetes.

Peripheral artery disease is more common among people with diabetes. About 1 in 3 people with diabetes have peripheral artery disease. Often people do not know they have peripheral artery disease because there are no symptoms.

When symptoms occur, they may include pain and swelling in the lower leg, and pain or cramping while walking, called claudication.

Peripheral artery disease usually affects the arteries taking blood to the legs, but can affect arteries going to the other parts of the body.

The reduced blood flow to the legs and feet can cause problems in the legs. The blocked blood flow can cause pain, numbness, and might make a person more susceptible to infection in the affected limb.

If the blockage is severe, an infection can lead to gangrene. This means that some tissue has died. Advanced cases of peripheral artery disease can lead to amputation.

Neuropathy (nerve damage)

High blood sugar can damage the nerves, leading to neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy most often affects the legs and feet.

A person with nerve damage in the foot can have an injury without feeling it.

An injury or wound that is not treated could lead to serious…

Dangers of diabetes can be reduced with help, action

In 2014, 29.1 million Americans were estimated to be living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes has increased 41 percent over a five-year period.

In fact, people with diagnosed diabetes have medical expenditures about 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes. This estimate highlights the burden that diabetes imposes on society.

Diabetes is characterized by persistently high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body’s failure to produce enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. However, the impact of diabetes goes beyond this chronic hyperglycemia. It can affect any part of your body. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), kidney failure (diabetic nephropathy) and nontraumatic lower limb amputations (diabetic neuropathy). People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications (heart attacks and strokes). It is estimated that diabetes and its related complications result in more than 200,000 deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S.

The good news is that you can prevent most of these problems by healthful eating, being physically active, and working with your health care provider to keep your blood glucose under control.

People can develop diabetes or be prediabetic at any age. Prediabetes occurs when the amount of glucose in your blood is above normal yet not high enough to be called diabetes. With prediabetes, your chances of getting diabetes, heart disease and stroke are higher. The main types of diabetes include type 1, type 2 and gestational. Type 1-diabetes results when your body no longer makes insulin or enough insulin because the cells that makes insulin are damaged. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin resistance – your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, to meet the body’s demand. As a result, the body’s cells do not properly respond to the insulin, leading to persistently high concentrations of the sugar glucose in the blood. With some weight loss and moderate exercise, you can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes, possibly without medicine. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth.

One of the easiest ways to determine if you are developing diabetes is to have your blood tested for sugar. Some symptoms that might suggests that you are developing diabetes include increased thirst, unexplained weight loss, excessive hunger, and frequent urination.

If you have concerns about…

How South Africa can beat its sugar-fuelled diabetes epidemic

Four times as many people have Type II diabetes today as 36 years ago, according to the World Health Organisation. In 1980, 108 million people were diagnosed with diabetes worldwide. By 2014, the figure was 422 million.

In South Africa, 7% of adults aged 21 to 79 – 3.85 million people – have diabetes. A large proportion of these remain undiagnosed.

The global prevalence of adult diabetes has nearly doubled – and is rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Globally, about 1.5 million people died as a direct result of diabetes in 2012.

Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. Stringent glucose control has reduced some small-vessel complications such as blindness and kidney failure. The residual risk of large-vessel complications such as heart attacks and stroke remains high.

Cause and effect

Excessive calorie consumption and sedentary lifestyles are the main contributors to the development of diabetes. Some people with a genetic predisposition to the disease are considered high risk, but it is largely preventable.

As South Africans become more urbanised, exposure to high-caloric, processed foods has increased, and rates of diabetes with it.

Being able to buy processed “food-like” products is often seen as a mark of personal and material success. Little attention is paid to having a healthy diet. Intense advertising campaigns by the beverage and “food product” industries exacerbate the problem.

An abundance of evidence links the intake of beverages high in sugar – like soft drinks and energy drinks – to a high risk of developing diabetes and obesity.

The average South African is unaware that a can of a cool drink typically contains nearly 10 teaspoons of sugar. The World Health Organisation recommends that people not consume more than 12 teaspoons of added sugar per day. Keeping the daily intake under six teaspoons has further health benefits.

Lifestyles have become more sedentary and work environments are not conducive to physical activity. Patients often quote crime, road safety concerns and poorly maintained parks and recreational areas as reasons for not exercising outdoors.

The South African government has taken a great interest in non-communicable diseases. But its focus is on tuberculosis and HIV, which have individual budget allocations. Diabetes is under the general non-communicable diseases budget. Non-governmental organisations receive little to no funding for diabetes education, prevention or supplies.

The challenges with treatment

The health system offers comprehensive services for diabetes care and prevention. But these are not universally implemented, possibly due to lack of funds or maladministration.

As a result, the quality of treatment is poor. Drug shortages…

‘Smart’ Socks Designed By Siren Care Aim To Help Diabetics Track Health Of Feet Effectively

Sirencare socks

Siren Care, a Diabetic health tracking startup has come up with a method to detect inflammation and injury of the feet in real time using ‘smart socks’. These socks are specially designed to use temperature sensors for this very purpose. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients are prone to foot injuries, swelling and other issues due to nerve damage and hence can create serious problems like severe infection and even amputation if not treated in time. While at Northwestern University, co-founder of the startup, Ran Ma was working on growing biomass to grow skin that had been damaged and during this research she thought of making a wearable that could prevent and track injuries at the same time. Both the founders, Ma and Veronica Tran were aware that early detection of an injury is vital to treatment and thought that built in sensors in a wearable are the solution to the problem at hand.

How it works?

Siren’s socks aren’t the first wearable that tries to detect foot injuries. SurroSense Rx is a wireless insert for the shoe for diabetes patients and Tillges Technologies’ PressureGuardian is a boot that is designed for the same purpose. However, a boot or a foot pad is either bulky or difficult to insert and not sufficiently close to the skin. Siren’s socks have sensors woven into the fabric and help detect wherever inflammation is found. After detection all the information is uploaded to an app on your smart phone that alerts you about where the problem lies. All data is stored on the…

Siren Care makes a “smart” sock to track diabetic health

Diabetic health tracking startup Siren Care has created smart socks that use temperature sensors to detect inflammation — and therefore injury — in realtime for diabetics.

Co-founder Ran Ma was working on growing biomass to grow back skin that had been damaged while at Northwestern University when she started learning how to treat diabetic feet and thought of making a wearable that could track and prevent injuries.

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients are prone to foot swelling, among other foot issues and it can lead to some serious problems such as infection or amputation of the foot if not checked. Early detection is crucial to head off any serious complications and Ma and her co-founder Veronica Tran believe built-in sensors are the key.

But Siren’s socks aren’t the first wearable to aim for detection of a diabetic foot injury. SurroSense Rx is a wireless shoe insert for diabetics and the PressureGuardian from Tillges Technologies is a boot designed to detect issues as well.

But a boot is cumbersome and Siren’s socks are closer to the skin than a foot pad in your shoe. The…

Fighting foot ulcers — a very serious problem for diabetics

Carolyn Moore is a woman of faith. Raised in Miami, she loves to bike and swim, although she has not been able to do either for some time.

She calls her best friend, roommate and caretaker, “Sister.” Moore says Sister, whose real name is June Stevens, has been like an angel since Moore lost her foot to a diabetic lesion three years ago.

Moore, now 60, was studying philosophy at Miami Dade College in October 2013 when she felt a sharp pain in her foot. She was rushed to the hospital and was devastated to learn that a small bump on her big toe was infected with gangrene. She says that within weeks, she had all of her toes and half of her foot amputated. Today, she walks occasionally with a walker but mostly uses a wheelchair.

“I got into a little depressed mood, but I am a religious person, and I believe in God, and God doesn’t make mistakes,” Moore says with boundless optimism. “And I had a very, very good doctor.”

Moore recovered from the operation only to have a lesion reappear in the same spot in August 2015. This time, she decided to see Dr. Robert Kirsner at UHeath — University of Miami Health System.

Of the estimated 29 million Americans with diabetes, Kirsner says that one in four will develop foot lesions, and of those who do, one in six will require an amputation.

“One of the things we’ve learned in the past decade is that if you have a diabetic foot ulcer, you are more likely to die,” Kirsner says. “It puts you in a dangerous category. It’s common, and it has significant medical complications.”

Since the lesion occurred in the same location, it was important to treat her aggressively to avoid further amputation, he said. He used an advanced treatment called skin substitution therapy, which involves replicating missing skin with cell or tissue-based products. These products can be made from living or non-living cells and include substances like collagen or cadaver…

New Beverly Hospital center to prevent patients losing limbs due to diabetes

Diabetes patient Larry Mora, 65, of Norwalk attends Beverly Hospital's grand opening of its new Amputation Prevention Center facility where the most serious complications of diabetes are addressed in Montebello, Calif. Nov. 17, 2016. (Photo by Leo Jarzomb, SGV Tribune/ SCNG)
Diabetes patient Larry Mora, 65, of Norwalk attends
Beverly Hospital’s grand opening of its new Amputation Prevention
Center facility where the most serious complications of diabetes
are addressed in Montebello, Calif. Nov. 17, 2016. (Photo by Leo
Jarzomb, SGV Tribune/ SCNG)
Diabetes patient Larry Mora, 65, of Norwalk attends Beverly Hospital's grand opening of its new Amputation Prevention Center facility in Montebello, Calif. Nov. 17, 2016. (Photo by Leo Jarzomb, SGV Tribune/ SCNG)
Diabetes patient Larry Mora, 65, of Norwalk attends
Beverly Hospital’s grand opening of its new Amputation Prevention
Center facility in Montebello, Calif. Nov. 17, 2016. (Photo by Leo
Jarzomb, SGV Tribune/ SCNG)

MONTEBELLO >> Caregivers at the opening of Beverly Hospital’s Amputation Prevention Center on Thursday vowed that patients losing a limb due to diabetes, or any other arterial complication, will be the last resort in treatment.
Lower body amputation, officials said, decreases quality...