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Lyfebulb’s End of Summer Drinks!

Last Thursday we enjoyed an evening of Champagne, courtesy of Prestige des Sacres, cocktails made with be-mixed mixers, cookies to go from KNOW foods, and of course some wonderful food, service, and the prime location of a Lyfebulb favorite, Brasserie Ruhlmann.

We want to thank everyone who came out and showed what an incredibly strong community we are proud to be a part of. Our goal is always to improve the quality of life of those living with chronic illness in general, and type 1 diabetes in particular.

We hope that you will consider making a donation to the Lyfebulb Foundation to help fund future gatherings such as last week’s and to support patient entrepreneurship. Together we can make a difference in the lives of patients everywhere!

Real Talk With Dave: The Power of Social Media In Bringing Type 1 Diabetics Together

I’ve started my journey on social media as a Type 1 Diabetic back in 2014 when the idea of social media was just beginning to pick up. Since then, I have noticed a huge growth in support, awareness, and a building community develop right before my eyes. Being a T1D, I go through things that many non-Diabetics simply do not understand or are unable to relate with. Social media, however, has opened up that awkward space, allowing Diabetics to find other Diabetics going through the EXACT same thing.

I can honestly say that I was in a dark spot in my life right before I created my Diabetic-based Instagram page and shortly after creating @type1livabetic, I saw how many people began to visit my page, Diabetic or not, and they all were someone who seemed to have a familiar idea about T1D. It makes a huge difference when your audience actually knows what you are talking about. As we are being completely real here, I want to share how important social media has been to me thus far and how it can be just as important to you as well.

The amount of support and care that others can provide online, simply by sending a quick message or commenting on a post can play such an important part in our lives, more that one can imagine.

The Diabetic community, as sad as it may seem, is growing quite rapidly, but that just means that there are more and more people each day who are out there, sharing what they go through, looking for support, and being a shoulder to cry on during some of the worst days possible. That being said, there is a large community out there just waiting to help out and lend a hand as Type 1 Diabetes is no joke and is very real. When I have a rough day, I simply put out content when I feel like I need relief and support and in return, I get some of the kindest responses. Those are the moments in my Diabetic life in which I feel like I can continue and push through that rough spot.

To me, social media is about allowing for creativity and our own unique space in which we can share our style and personality with others. I love prepping my posts where I apply my own unique creativity and do designs, lettering, and illustrations on my photos, hoping to excite the viewer and show them that Diabetes can be fun, regardless of what it has to throw our way. Social media was designed to give people a purpose and a platform in which they can connect and share openly with one another things that interest them. Having a group of people in the Diabetic community staying loyal and true to what really goes down in their lives allows for more people to be inspired and share.

The bottom line is that having a space to feel comfortable in talking about something so huge (Diabetes) is so important to an individual. Now a days, really young people are joining the social media game and it is important that they find the support that they may be looking for. Some days I even forget that I have T1D, simply because I have a huge online support group that keeps me going and is cheering me on, allowing me to feel inspired and positive that I can continue to take on this disease, one day at a time.

How I Accepted My Type 1 Diabetes

My name is Rebecca Sellin. I’m 22 years old and I live in a city called Jönköping in Sweden. Right now I’m studying to become a pre-school teacher at Jönköping University. I’ve been living with type 1 diabetes for the past 6 years, but sometimes it feels like even longer, because I can’t even remember how it’s like to live a “normal” life.

But what is a normal life anyway? Everyone is struggling with something, T1D is my struggle.

But I have decided to see the positive sides of it. I love to have an active and healthy lifestyle, but I don’t like to be treated differently because of my T1D, and that’s why I hid my condition for some years, because I didn’t want people to see me as a weak person.

My diabetes was discovered when I was involved in a minor car accident in my neighborhood when I was 16 years old. Thank God I wasn’t badly hurt, but in the hospital a doctor asked me if I had diabetes, since my blood glucose was really high. I told them that I didn’t have diabetes. At that point, I didn’t know anything about diabetes, except I had a lot of prejudices about it. In hindsight, I can see I had all the classic symptoms such as thirst, weight loss and lack of energy. I had to stay in the hospital for almost a week to learn about T1D and how to manage it. I’m still learning new things and it has taken me 6 years to accept my condition. Diabetes is like a puzzle where some pieces are always missing, and you can’t see the whole picture. It’s like a full time job where you get no vacations, not even on your birthday.

I used to always take my insulin shots in the bathroom, or hide my insulin pump. But eventually I learned that I made my disease even harder when trying to hide it from everyone and trying to fit in. I felt so alone, since I didn’t know anyone with diabetes, and I knew I just had to meet other people with diabetes that fully understands what it’s like. My family and friends are super supportive, but they will never fully understand what it’s like to always have diabetes, and constantly be thinking about it. So I decided to start a group on Facebook to organize meetings and be able to meet with other T1Ds in my city. We meet up a couple of times a month and do stuff together like bowling, taking walks and going to cafes. This has been so helpful for me in the process of accepting my disease, and I can only thank my diabetes for meeting all my new friends, or my diabuddies, as I like to call them.

Also, I’m really happy for the diabetes community that I found on Instagram. To be able to meet people who go through the same things on a daily basis as I do gives me energy to keep on fighting every single day. Together we are stronger and can support each other. My goal is to inspire others who live with T1D, and to never let diabetes stop me from doing what I want in my life and chasing my dreams. I’ve grown so much since my diagnosis, and I’m so excited to see what life will bring.

A month ago I got a diabetes tattoo with my diabuddie, Elin. The tattoo says “I am greater than my highs and lows” which is a great reminder everyday when struggling with your blood glucose.


Follow Becca on Instagram @type1becca

Keep Your Fitness Resolution All Year Long

Year in and year out, fitness and New Year’s resolutions seem to go hand in hand. Every year a promise of a livelier, healthier, fitter you comes to the front of your focus —at least for a few months, anyway. In order to keep your fitness resolution well into the new year and perhaps even carry it into the next year, you must build a momentum and stick with it! The only thing standing between you and your ideal of perfect health —is you.

Find Your Tribe

The good thing about having an extremely common resolution such as health and fitness is how easy it will be for you to find people to connect with. Surrounding yourself with like-minded people who are on the same quest as you will indeed keep you from slacking on your goal. A good support system will aide in assisting you with making sure your fitness stays a priority. If your support team isn’t in your immediate family or circle of friends, no worries, there are several other ways you can meet them.

One good resource for finding your tribe is a social media outlet such as Facebook. You could pose a question via status to your friends’ list asking if any of them have a new year’s resolution in fitness. If Facebook isn’t your thing you can always go the organic route and meet people by attending classes at your gym or workout facility. Once you’ve found your accountability partner(s) you can either workout together, or contact each other on a regular basis to make sure you are still focused on your resolution. You will be more likely to accomplish your goals when you feel like there is someone cheering on your progress!

Prep your meals ahead of time

One of the quickest ways to thwart your efforts in the gym is unhealthy eating. In a world where convenience is king, drive-throughs and processed foods have just about taken over healthy, planned, wholesome meals. If you are serious about sticking to your resolution, it will be wise to avoid the pitfalls of poor food choices. Heavy snacking and less than healthy meals will definitely put a monkey wrench in your progress.

In order to beat this, it’s best to plan and cook all of your meals at the beginning of the week. Also choose healthy, easy to grab snacks to ensure that you won’t reach for the nearest bag of chips when you get that midday urge. Poor dieting choices have the tendency to make you sluggish and unmotivated. Be sure to load up on foods that will give your body the fuel and energy it needs to pursue a healthy lifestyle.

Your health journey is a marathon, not a sprint

A lot of times in all the hype surrounding the new year, people tend to set goals that may not be feasible or realistic to attain. A fast start almost always guarantees a burnout, so be mindful of that when setting your fitness resolutions. Give your mind and body time to adjust to your new fitness regimen —do not over do it. Start at a pace that feels natural to you, then work your way up from there. Track your progression and allow yourself the opportunity to feel good when you cross a milestone. The more you treat your fitness goal like a lifestyle, the more likely it will become integrated into your day to day routine. Let your new year’s resolution guide you into a lifestyle that you can look back on next year with pride and contentment!

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When It Comes To Fighting Diabetes, We Are Indeed Stronger Together

Let’s all unite for National Diabetes Day Nov 14

Diabetes is a disease that can make you feel very lonely – it requires self-discipline, behavior modification, and a whole lot of courage. Diabetes never leaves you, there is no vacation from it even if you sometimes just want to forget about it!

I spent many years controlling my Type 1 diabetes (T1D) extremely well and then some years dismissing it. I wanted to have a life, not just be a person with diabetes. I never asked for help – my attitude was that I was going to solve the puzzle and get rid of this terrible condition once and for all. After studying the disease in med school and as a scientist, I realized it was not so simple. The people with diabetes who I encountered during my education and my early years with the disease, were mostly very sick, since the people I saw had ended up in the hospital where I was studying or working. I had absolutely no interest in connecting with them since I could not relate to them. I was, frankly, afraid of them, and surely not inspired or comforted by them. When I was working as an intern in the ER of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, or as a post-doc at Boston’s Joslin Diabetes Center, I saw individuals who were struggling with foot ulcers, blindness, kidney or heart disease on a daily basis, and my mind became more and more set on not disclosing that I was one of them.

After leaving medicine and working in the life sciences industry, I stopped paying as much attention to my disease since the long-term consequences of the disease seemed very far away, while the near-term issues, such as having to fear low blood sugars and having to tell colleagues to accommodate to my eating habits were less desirable to someone living in the fast lane! Yet again, I did not relate to anyone with diabetes although there were several people who were going through what I was living and doing it well!

I now realize that I was wrong. Relating to others, opening up about issues in addition to strengths and weaknesses makes you stronger and it helps others as well as yourself!

Today, on National Diabetes Day we embrace fellow individuals living with diabetes, we welcome anyone who wants to share their story, and we encourage families and friends of people with diabetes to open up about their struggles.

At www.Lyfebulb.com we realize that this fight against a disease that is becoming a pandemic is not one to fight alone. We lead by example, fostering partnerships with fellow organizations to increase our reach, to expand our capabilities, and grow our community. We have also embraced mutual and diverse partners ranging from the global diabetes leader, Novo Nordisk for our Innovation Awardfocused on patient entrepreneurs, to art galleries Contini Art UK in London and Unix Gallery in Chelsea to showcase a performance by type 1 diabetic Omar Hassan on November 17th, to specially curated diabetic-friendly menus at Brasserie Ruhlmann in Rockefeller Center and Le Colonial in Midtown. We have also partnered with Punch Fitness Center on the Upper East Side of Manhattan to encourage exercise. In addition, we advise a number of smaller biotechnology and healthcare IT companies in their path toward improving the quality of life for people with diabetes, and we encourage entrepreneurs who are deriving their motivation for innovation and business-building from their own experiences with disease.

Today is a day to celebrate our unity, to celebrate our fight – but also to Live Lyfe with and without diabetes!

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This blog was also featured on The Huffington Post on November 14, 2016.

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