Naturally Sweet



I think it is safe to say that we Diabetics are naturally sweet, but what does that really mean? Well for starters, the saying, “naturally sweet”, can mean an array of things.

Most non-Diabetics will hear the term “Diabetes” and think of people who ate too much sugar or are overweight, but we all know that’s not the case. People will assume that Diabetics cannot consume any sugar or they will die, again, not the case.

Over time, we endure so many different assumptions, labels, and hurtful comments towards our Diabetes that honestly don’t feel good to hear. I’m 20 years old and have had Diabetes for 9 years and still get those comments from non-Diabetics. When I was first diagnosed, those comments didn’t affect me. Fast forward to today, I have educated myself and lived/experienced so much in my Diabetic journey to the point where now, I truly cannot tolerate hurtful assumptions people may say to me or near me. I’m not just speaking for myself. The whole Diabetic community has expressed their frustrations and experiences on dealing with people who viewed them as the stereotypical Diabetic. Some of those comments include: “oh, did you get Diabetes from eating too much sugar?”, “Diabetics can’t eat sugar.”, or “you don’t look Diabetic”. These are just some examples and trust me, I’ve heard much worse.

We are getting so close to the end for Type 1 Diabetes and living out a normal and healthy life has become so much easier and much more manageable due to all the advanced forms of technology, specialized medicine, and even just by spreading awareness and building a community.

The typical stereotypes should not determine our future or our own individual decisions. We can eat sugar. We can do whatever we put our minds to.

And we are so much more capable of doing things that we want to nowadays due to all the advancements that allow us to do so.

Diabetics work hard each day just to stay alive. I think sometimes we all can get carried away and take life for granted, but when you really think about how critical and complex Diabetes management truly is, that in itself can be the main motivator in your life to keep you going.

My point right now is that we are naturally sweet for all these reasons. We are hard-working, focused and motivated, and in it to win it (it being a cure!). We are sweet because we can not only be of an assistance to other Diabetics by creating a kind and inviting environment but at the end of the day, when you look back at all you went through that day and how you took care of yourself, good or bad, you’re simply…sweet!

So go ahead, make a change in this world, prove them wrong, eat that sugary donut or ice cream (with Insulin of course!), because, with that natural fighting spirit we Diabetics are given, we can do literally… ANYTHING!

Live well,

Dave

LBNN Application Deadline is this Friday!

Greetings from the Nordic Life Science Days!

We are looking for the best patient entrepreneurs within diabetes consumer and medical devices, or healthcare information technology. Apply to be one of the ten finalists who will travel to Copenhagen, Denmark and attend the 2017 Lyfebulb-Novo Nordisk Innovation Summit and compete for monetary prizes!

Since applications close this Friday, September 15, we reflect upon the concept of patient entrepreneurship.

These people are exceptional individuals and they inspire others to an extent I have never seen before in the chronic disease community. They may not be climbing mountains, or cycling across the country, but instead, they are solving problems that we all encounter when living with a chronic condition.

Instead of waiting for others to help them as a patient, the patient entrepreneur finds solutions to everyday problems that are not always apparent to the mind of a scientist or business person, and they go out and start a business, build a product, and change the future for themselves and others! This can be done by finding a way to register when and how much insulin was dosed, bringing together people with chronic disease through technology and inventive models to change behavior, improving the look and feel of everyday medical devices, or just making certain items we eat or drink healthier and tastier.

This brings to market better products and it inspires all patients to take charge of their health and be less complacent – be less of a victim and more of a problem solver.

At Lyfebulb we ask people to take charge, to live beyond their disease or condition, and to utilize the patient experience when identifying solutions.

In contrast to organizations who monitor and describe patient experiences (all sensor companies and patient platforms), we offer solvers and solutions.

We inspire people to Live Lyfe – that is why our slogan is

“Turn Your Lyfe On”

Lyfebulb’s End of Summer Drinks!

Last Thursday we enjoyed an evening of Champagne, courtesy of Prestige des Sacres, cocktails made with be-mixed mixers, cookies to go from KNOW foods, and of course some wonderful food, service, and the prime location of a Lyfebulb favorite, Brasserie Ruhlmann.

We want to thank everyone who came out and showed what an incredibly strong community we are proud to be a part of. Our goal is always to improve the quality of life of those living with chronic illness in general, and type 1 diabetes in particular.

We hope that you will consider making a donation to the Lyfebulb Foundation to help fund future gatherings such as last week’s and to support patient entrepreneurship. Together we can make a difference in the lives of patients everywhere!

Angela Bassett Opens Up About Losing Her Mother And Saving Lives With New Campaign

Yes, Angela Bassett is an A-list celebrity. But she’s also a mother, wife and daughter who works to protect her loved ones.

The actress lost her mother, Betty Jane, in 2014 to heart disease caused by type 2 diabetes, and since then she’s made it her mission to educate other’s on the close link between the two illnesses.

On a warm Wednesday morning, the actress talked to ESSENCE about type 2 diabetes, her work with the For Your SweetHeart movement, and upcoming projects.

“She had a very, very strong constitution so I know that if she was able to get that under control she’d be sitting beside me today,” Bassett said about her mother’s diabetes.

“She had heart disease, high blood pressure, and complications with that. Each exacerbated the other. Sometimes just trying to grab ahold of all these different issues simultaneously was hard. Listening to your doctors and taking that advice and doing it is vital.”

With 29 million Americans suffering from type 2 diabetes, we wanted to know from the incredibly…

Break the fast if you have hypoglycemic symptoms, experts advise diabetic patients

Break the fast if you have hypoglycemic symptoms, experts advise diabetic patients
Islamabad

Fasting is generally very challenging for people living with diabetes, particularly insulin-dependent patients with Type 1 diabetes. Diabetic patients who wish to fast must diligently plan for a safe Ramazan. It is important to individualize each patient’s management plan, depending on their diet and lifestyle, medications, risk of hypoglycemia, and glycemic control, and to minimize complications associated with fasting. Generally, the risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in patients with Type 2 diabetes is not overly common, and has less severe consequences.

Consultant endocrinologist at Shifa International Hospital (SIH) Dr. Sheraz Khan shared this information at a seminar on ‘Roza aur Sehat,’ organized to create awareness in diabetic patients who intend to fast without harming their
blood glucose level. A large number of patients, doctors and people from various walks of life attended the seminar.

The approximate number of Muslims with diabetes is around 4.6%; an estimated 50 million Muslims with diabetes around the world observe fasting during the month of Ramazan each year, Dr. Sheraz shared. Islam exempts people from the duty of fasting if they are sick, or if fasting affects their health, as fasting for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications including hypoglycemia, postprandial hyperglycemia, and metabolic complications associated with dehydration.

Nevertheless, a large number of people with diabetes still choose to fast during Ramazan despite the advice of their doctor and permission from religious authorities, thus creating medical challenges for themselves and their healthcare providers. It is thus important for such patients to make necessary preparations to engage in fasting as safely as possible, Dr. Sheraz underlined.

Consultant endocrinologist at SIH Dr. Tayyab Badshah said, patients may be reluctant to self-monitor…

10 foods that can help prevent diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association.

Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found.

Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role.

In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found.

Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes:

1. Apples
You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes.

Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes.

“It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that naturally slows the digestion of the sugars,” Karen Ansel, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Syosset, New York, and author of “Healing Superfoods for Anti-Aging,” told Fox News.

But be sure to eat apples with the skin because this park of the fruit has six times more quercetin than its flesh.

2. Yogurt
Eating a serving of yogurt every day can cut your risk for type 2 diabetes by 18 percent, a November 2014 study out of the Harvard School of Public Health found.

Although it’s not clear whether that’s because yogurt has probiotics, one thing is for sure: The snack, especially the Greek variety, is high in protein, which makes you feel satiated and prevents large blood sugar spikes, Marina Chaparro, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), and a certified diabetes educator in Miami, Florida, told Fox News.

New in-body sensor could monitor and regulate insulin levels in real-time

Researchers at Stanford University have designed a dynamic real-time biosensor that could one day continuously detect and maintain optimal levels of drugs like insulin.

Health monitoring via in-body sensors is one of the hot areas of current research. This particular technology, which accounts for individual variability in the response to drugs, may allow more effective use of insulin for people with type 1 diabetes.

This would effectively take other technologies integrated in artificial pancreas systems, like TypeZero’s inControl platform, to the next level. Those control solutions only make suggestions on corrections to insulin management.

Tom Soh, a Stanford electrical engineer, and his postdoc fellow, Peter Mage, developed a three component model of the new in-body sensor, which resembles a thin rectangular microchip.

It consists of a biosensor which detects active levels of a drug in the bloodstream, paired with a controller that calculates exactly the right dose to maintain and a programmable pump acting as a delivery man that releases just that amount.

The sensor part forms a complex of molecules, called aptamers, that have been specially designed by Soh to bind receptors of any drug of interest, in the same fashion as seats on a bus that have to be filled.

As a drug enters in contact with a receptor site, the aptamers change shape and send an electric signal, in response to which the pump technology loads or unloads more or less of the drug if and when a seat is empty.

It essentially behaves as a closed-loop system, one that monitors and adjusts continuously. Soh and Mage first began testing it by administering a chemotherapy drug, called doxorubicin, in animals.

Many years of tests still lie ahead, but the first animal experiments yielded encouraging results. The researchers were able to stabilise levels of the chemotherapy drug, even when deliberately introducing a second drug that is known to change its effects.

Provided that it works as well in humans, this mode of delivery, described in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, could be applied to so many drugs and areas of health, including the diabetes field.

In a not too distant future, it could perhaps enable people with type 1 diabetes to better use insulin to prevent dangerous spikes or dips in blood sugar levels.

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Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions
Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison.

This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage.

In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise.

For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against insulin resistance, join the Low Carb Program.

Following pre-diabetes or metabolic disorder, type 2 diabetes can potentially be avoided through diet and exercise.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the hormone insulin is not used effectively by the cells in your body. Insulin is needed for cells to take in glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream and convert it into energy.

Ineffective use of insulin results in the body becoming resistant to insulin – also known as insulin resistance, which in turn causes blood sugar levels to rise (hyperglycemia).

In…

Missing Breakfast is Not Good For You! Here Are 10 Best Breakfast Foods and Quick Recipes For a Good Morning

Delicious food

Chances are, you have heard someone tell you not to skip breakfast. This is usually followed with, “it’s the most important meal of the day!” But when you slept through your alarm and you need to wash your hair, finding five minutes to get dressed beats finding five minutes to grab something to eat. Sure, you will hear your stomach growling before you get to work or class, but it’s no big deal, right? You can just eat a big lunch and you’ll be fine. Well it turns out that isn’t the case. In fact, skipping breakfast can lead to more than hunger. According to one study, men who skip breakfast increase their risk of heart attack by nearly 30% [1]. And women who skipped their first meal of the day put themselves at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by about 54%.

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But even if you know how important breakfast is, we live in a fast-paced world. Often times, there just doesn’t seem to be any room to make a meal when you first wake up. And going through a drive through or getting one of those suspicious breakfast sandwiches at Starbucks usually leaves you with more guilt than nutrition. So you go without. This seems like a smart move. After all, if you eat nothing, it’s better than eating something fattening or sugary probably. Well, that’s a myth, too!

Why you need to eat breakfast.

You’ll gain weight if you skip breakfast.

Though it can be tempting to skip breakfast due to a lack of time, appetite or options, skipping breakfast can actually lead to weight gain, not loss. This seems completely unfair, I know. But skipping breakfast makes your body freak out and crave sugary and fatty foods to compensate for the lack of nutrients. Therefore, when you do eat, you’re probably not going for that salad covered in vegetables. Because your hunger level is so high, you’ll be more likely to eat a lot, and none of it will be especially healthy. Before you know it, this habit of skipping breakfast and having an unhealthy lunch results in a shopping trip for bigger pants.

You’ll be “hangry.”

Hangry: A bad mood caused by hunger.

We’ve all been there. When you’re hungry, you get frustrated. When you don’t eat, your energy levels dwindle, causing everything to seem like more of a chore. In summary, EAT.

One study found that men who ate breakfast had a more positive mood than those who skipped. When you skip the most important meal of the day, your blood sugar drops suddenly which can lead to irritability, fatigue and even headaches. And if you’re sitting at school or work with a headache and an empty stomach, it doesn’t take long before you hate the world. Eating regularly helps to support a good attitude. So do yourself, and those around you a favor and don’t skip breakfast [2].

You put your heart at risk by skipping breakfast.

Skipping breakfast may not feel like a big deal. After all, you ate dinner. But when you sleep, your body goes into fasting mode. Therefore, when you wake up, you need to reset your metabolism and hormones by ingesting healthy food. Prolonged fasting, like that done during sleep, leads to increased blood pressure and cholesterol. This decreases the concentration of HDL-cholesterol. What do all these medical terms mean? It means you’re setting yourself up for heart disease….

Four myths about diabetes debunked

You don’t have to be overweight or obese to have type 2 diabetes.

The World Health Organisation estimates that the number of people with diabetes is 422m, globally. And between 1980 and 2014 the number of people with the condition almost doubled. Despite the high prevalence of the disease, it is often misunderstood. Here are some common misconceptions about diabetes.

1. Diabetes is purely a disorder of the pancreas

Diabetes does affect the pancreas, but it shouldn’t just be thought of as an illness that affects the body from the neck down. If we take this viewpoint we miss the psychological impact of living with this condition. And it’s a big one. As well as the issue of adjusting to the diagnosis of a long-term health condition, people with diabetes are more likely to develop depression. There is even a specific form of depression associated with diabetes known as diabetes distress. It’s when a person is struggling to cope with managing their condition.

Having diabetes affects your mental abilities too. Research suggests that diabetes can affect your ability to think clearly, focus and recall memories.

Diabetes also affects other brain processes, such as how we weigh up food choices. Researchers are also investigating how hormones, such as insulin, seem to regulate food choices. These particular brain effects, within a system called the midbrain dopamine system, offer one potential explanation for why some diabetics find it difficult to follow health advice, no matter how often they are given it.

2. Only overweight or obese people get diabetes

There is a strong association between type 2 diabetes and obesity, but that doesn’t mean that everyone who is diabetic is overweight or obese. Nor does it mean that everyone who is overweight or obese will develop diabetes.

However, a Public Health England report said that obese adults in England were five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than adults of a normal weight. But there is still a lot of work to be done to fully understand the link between diabetes and obesity….

Low glycemic index diet found to lower health threats from high blood pressure

A new review of a dozen randomised controlled trials has found that a lower glycemic index (GI) diet proves effective for reducing blood pressure and, by extension, reducing heart disease risks.

Hypertension (high blood pressure) is one of the features of the metabolic syndrome and a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a common long-term complication of type 2 diabetes.

Damage to nerves and blood vessels can arise from high blood sugars, and heart complications develop much more quickly if blood pressure is high. This is because tissues in the heart are especially vulnerable to increases in blood pressure.

We know from previous research that a lower-carbohydrate diet, which generally is considered a lower-GI diet, is associated with measurable decreases in blood pressure.

In this new research review, comprised of a total of 14 six-week long trials and involving 1097 healthy participants, researchers found similar results.

Thirteen of those trials reported that a reduction in glycemic index by 10 units decreased both systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DPB) by 1.1 and 1.3 mm Hg, respectively.

In addition to that, nine trials found that a reduction in glycemic load of 28 units reduced overall SBP and DBP by 2.0 and 1.4 mm Hg, respectively.

Taken together, these results tend to indicate that lower-GI and GL diet may benefit high blood pressure, likely because they help reduce blood sugar.

It is thought that when the body produces too much insulin and leptin in response to a higher-carb, high-GI diet, it causes blood pressure to increase. Another factor is the effects of glycation on lipoproteins leading to atherosclerosis and therefore narrowed blood vessels.

Yet, one of the first recommendations to lower blood sugar is to cut back on salt. There might be far more to maintaining a healthy blood pressure than eating a low-salt diet, which is a strategy that works for some people and fails for others.

In that sense, this review may implicitly suggest that it is time for guidelines aimed at controlling hypertension to shift focus away from salt and focus greater attention to the likely more consequential reduction in sugar.

If you are diagnosed with high blood pressure, going on a low-carb, lower-GI diet may go a long way toward controlling your levels. You can find out more by joining our Low Carb Program.

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Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions
Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison.

This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage.

In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise.

For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against insulin resistance, join the Low Carb Program.

Following pre-diabetes or metabolic disorder, type 2 diabetes can potentially be avoided through diet and exercise.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the hormone insulin is not used effectively by the cells in your body. Insulin is needed for cells to take in glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream and convert it into energy.

Ineffective use of insulin results in the body becoming resistant to insulin – also known as insulin resistance, which in turn causes blood sugar levels to rise (hyperglycemia).

In advanced stages, type 2 diabetes may cause damage to insulin producing cells in…

Scientists find new genetic locations for type 2 diabetes

Scientists from University College London and Imperial College London in the United Kingdom have identified new genetic locations that might make some people more prone to developing type 2 diabetes.

[dna string]
Scientists identify 111 new genetic locations that indicate susceptibility to type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the numbers have skyrocketed in recent years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the number of people with diabetes has almost quadrupled in the past few decades, from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014.

In the United States, 29 million people currently have diabetes, and 86 million are thought to have prediabetes.

Until now, researchers were aware of 76 chromosomal locations, or “loci,” that underlie this metabolic disease. However, new research analyzed the human genome further and found an additional 111.

The new study – published in the American Journal of Human Genetics – was co-led by Dr. Nikolas Maniatis of University College London’s (UCL) Genetics, Evolution, and Environment department, together with Dr. Toby Andrew of Imperial College London’s Department of Genomics of Common Disease.

Identifying the type 2 diabetes genetic loci

Using a UCL-developed method of genetic mapping, Maniatis and team examined large samples of European and African American people, summarizing 5,800 cases of type 2 diabetes and almost 9,700 healthy controls.

They found that the new loci – together with the ones previously identified – control the expression of more than 266 genes surrounding the genetic location of the disease.

Most of the newly discovered loci were found outside of the coding regions of these genes, but within so-called hotspots that change the expression of these genes in body fat.

Of the newly identified 111 loci, 93 (or 84 percent) were found…

Is cheese safe for people with diabetes?

Compared with many other foods, cheese is high in fat and calories and may not be an obvious choice for someone with diabetes. Cheese and diabetes can, however, be a healthful combination.

Cheese lovers can enjoy a wide variety of cheeses without elevating blood sugar, raising blood pressure, or gaining weight.

For diabetes-friendly meals or snacks, people should choose healthful cheeses and serve them with foods that are rich in fiber and low in calories.

Can people with diabetes eat cheese?

People with diabetes can safely eat cheese as part of a balanced, healthful diet. Just as with other foods, moderation is the key. A diet mainly consisting of cheese is unhealthy for anyone.

When selecting cheeses, people with diabetes need to consider a few things:

[Selection of cheeses]
Although cheese is high in fat, it can be enjoyed in moderation by people with diabetes.

Cheese is very high in calories and fat. Though calorie content varies among cheese varieties, people with diabetes should avoid overindulging in cheese.

Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity, and losing just a few pounds can reduce the risk of diabetes.

There are several steps that people with diabetes can take to help them eat cheese without gaining weight:

  • stick to small servings
  • choose lower-calorie cheeses
  • use cheese as a source of flavor rather than as the main course

Cheese is high in saturated fat compared with many other foods. In small quantities, saturated fat is harmless and can actually be beneficial to the body. But excessive intake of saturated fats is linked to weight gain, high cholesterol, gallbladder problems, and heart disease.

The American Heart Association recommend a diet that contains no more than 5-6 percent saturated fat. That means that in a 2,000 calorie diet, no more than 120 calories or 13 grams (g) should come from saturated fats.

Other experts advise no more than 10 percent of daily caloric intake, which increases the amount of saturated fat, and cheese, that a person can consume safely. People with diabetes can meet this goal by sticking to no more than one serving of cheese per day.

The connection between saturated fat intake and heart disease is not as clear as it once seemed. An analysis of previous research found insufficient evidence linking saturated fats and heart disease.

However, people with diabetes are already at a higher risk of heart disease. As a result, they should continue consuming only small quantities of saturated fats until research provides clearer guidelines.

Until this time, the emphasis for people with diabetes should be to eat lots of plant-based foods that are rich in unsaturated fats.

People with diabetes…

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