Pro Ultrarunner Tim Tollefson’s Key Workout

tim tollefson ultra runner
Marathoner-turned-ultrarunner Tim Tollefson nears the 100-mile point of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc in the French Alps in 2016. He finished third. Peignee Verticale/Timothee Nalet

Tollefson’s shift to the trails brought immediate gratification. In his first off-road race and his first ultramarathon, the 2014 USA 50K Trail Championship, he won with a course record of 3:24:05. He quickly became one of the most competitive American trail runners on the world stage, placing eighth in his first international 50-miler less than three months later and second in his first 100K the following year.

Marathoner-turned-ultrarunner Tim Tollefson nears the 100-mile point of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc in the French Alps in 2016. He finished third.

“Tim loves being out in nature by himself; he thrives on that solitude,” says Tollefson’s coach, Mario Fraioli. “He was looking for something new to rekindle his competitiveness.”

A significant change in training or racing can freshen up anyone’s running, Fraioli says. Doing the same kinds of workouts training cycle after training cycle can result in plateaus and maybe injury—even if…

100-Day Government IT Roundup: Immigration, Innovation and Information Security in Trump’s America

The White House in Washington, D.C.

The first 100 days of President Trump’s term have come and gone, with the new leader tackling challenges such as health care, border protection and reinvigorating American business. But what about government IT?

Cybersecurity and modernization were hot-button topics during the election, fueled in part by repeated breaches of private organizations by nation-states and cybercriminals alike, and in part by the massive cost of maintaining legacy systems. As noted by Diginomica, the U.S. government spends more than $64 billion every year to keep legacy hardware up and running.

With 100 days in the books, it’s worth taking a look at where the government stands with IT and what comes next for federal technology policy.

Technology and Immigration

It’s no surprise that forward-thinking American companies are now recruiting top talent from across the world to improve existing technology, develop new platforms and enhance corporate opportunities. According to Wired, however, the need for outsourced talent may be at odds with new efforts by the government to overhaul the H-1B visa program. These visas help highly skilled immigrants make the transition to American companies, but also pave the way for unscrupulous actors to undercut U.S. salaries. As noted by Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, the program desperately needs reforms and hopes any changes “will both crack down on people who are abusing the system and make it easier for the best and brightest to be able to come here.”

The challenge for the Trump administration going forward will likely be creating an H-1B solution that allows tech companies to bring in top talent without hampering the growth of U.S.-based jobs. Given the increasing skills gap present in cybersecurity, it may be in the government’s best interest to tighten existing laws while simultaneously supporting more security training to meet global demand.

Influencing IT Innovation

The Diginomica article pointed out that there are still older systems up…

African-Americans are living longer, but racial disparity still exists, according to CDC

A report by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has shown there is still disparity between African-Americans (blacks) and whites in terms of life expectancy.

Although the overall death rate among blacks has fallen by about 25% in the U.S., life expectancy among blacks is still four years less than among whites.

Younger black people (in their 20s, 30s and 40s) are more likely to live with or die from conditions that usually only affect white people once they are older; conditions such as diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

The findings come from an analysis of health data from the US Census Bureau’s National Vital Statistics System and the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Age-specific data and death rates were analyzed for age groups 18–34, 35–49, 50–64 and older among black and white individuals between 1999 and 2015.

According to the report, death rates fell significantly for both races, as did the racial disparity in death rates, which was 33% in 1999, compared with 16% in 2015.

However, the data…

DWM earns national diabetes certification

Courtesy photo D.W. McMillan Hospital was recently awarded the prestigious American Diabetes Association Education recognition certificate for a quality diabetes self-management education program. Pictured are DWM’s dietician Ashley Bunnell and diabetic educator Autherine Davis with the hospital’s ADA certification.

The prestigious American Diabetes Association Education recognition certificate for a quality diabetes self-management education program was recently awarded to D.W. McMillan Hospital. ADA believes this program offers high-quality education that is an essential component of effective diabetes treatment.

The Association’s Education Recognition Certificate assures that educational programs meet the national standards for diabetes self-management education programs. These standards were developed and tested under the auspices of the National Diabetes Advisory Board in 1983 and were revised by the diabetes community in 1994, 2000, 2007 and 2012.

Programs apply for recognition voluntarily. Programs that achieve recognition status have a staff of knowledgeable health professionals who can provide participants with comprehensive information about diabetes management.

“The process gives professionals a national standard by which to measure the quality of services they provide,” said Autherine Davis, D.W. McMillan diabetic educator. “And, of course, it assures the consumer that he or she will likely receive high-quality service.” Education Recognition status is verified by an official certificate from ADA and awarded for four years.

According to the American Diabetes Association, there are 29.1 million people or 9.3 percent of the population in the United…

Verify: Insulin Cheaper in Canada

Fort Erie, Canada – NBC Nightly News reports that the price of insulin, which is used to treat Diabetes, has shot up more than 1,000 percent in the U.S. in the past 20 years. In fact, it’s estimated the U.S. now spends more than $322 billion dollars each year to treat the disease.

It has reached the point where some families are now taking desperate measures to get the vital medication their children and loved ones need to survive. That includes turning to the black market as some parents rely on secret online groups to swap and trade the insulin that their insurance covers so that they can obtain the insulin for their kids.

Back in February, a similar situation unfolded with another drug many people depend on for epileptic seizures. A Two On Your Side investigation with Reporter Steve Brown found that people here could get epipens much cheaper and legally at pharmacies in Canada.

2 On Your Side was able to confirm and verify that the same is true for insulin. We determined that the injectable form of insulin in a pre-loaded pen is actually much, much less expensive in Canada then in the U.S. That’s crucial for some people with diabetes who need the insulin to control blood sugar levels And considering that about eleven percent of Western New York residents are diabetic, according to a local doctor at UBMD Internal Medicine, it’s especially important.

At the Remedy’s RX drug store in Fort Erie, Ontario, Canadian pharmacist Gerard Longval says diabetics from the U.S. do seek out the price savings when it comes to life saving insulin. Again, especially when it comes to…

Diabetes is on the rise in America’s kids and experts don’t know why

A new study is the first to look at diabetes diagnosis trends in America’s youth. Video provided by Newsy

Newslook

The rate at which America’s kids are diagnosed with diabetes is climbing and researchers don’t know why.

A first-ever study of new diabetes diagnoses of U.S. youth under age 20 found both Types 1 and 2 diabetes surged from 2002-2012.

The diagnosis of new cases of Type 2 diabetes, associated with obesity, increased about 5% each year from 2002 to 2012, the study said, while new cases of Type 1, the most common form for young people, went up about 2% every year.

The National Institutes of Health, which funded the study along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said the cause of the rise is “unclear.”

“These findings lead to many more questions,” explained Dr….

Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the rise among children, teens

Fastest rise seen among racial/ethnic minority groups.

A girl with diabetes checks her blood glucose level.
A girl with diabetes checks her blood glucose level. Rates of youth getting both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased, according to the latest results of the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study.

Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing among youth in the United States, according to a report, Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012 (link is external), published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

In the United States, 29.1 million people are living with diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, and about 208,000 people younger than 20 years are living with diagnosed diabetes.

This study is the first ever to estimate trends in new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth (those under the age of 20), from the five major racial/ethnic groups in the U.S.: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. However, the Native American youth who participated in the SEARCH study are not representative of all Native American youth in the United States. Thus, these rates cannot be generalized to all Native American youth nationwide.

The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study (link is external), funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that from 2002 to 2012, incidence, or the rate of new diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in youth increased by about 1.8 percent each year. During the same period, the rate of new diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes increased even more quickly, at 4.8 percent. The study included 11,244 youth ages 0-19 with type 1 diabetes and 2,846 youth ages 10-19 with type 2.

“Because of the early age of onset and longer diabetes duration, youth are at risk for developing diabetes related complications at a younger age. This profoundly lessens their quality of life, shortens their life expectancy, and increases health care costs,” said Giuseppina Imperatore, M.D., Ph.D., epidemiologist in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

The study results reflect the nation’s…

Starbucks Releases ‘American Cherry Pie Frappuccino.’ In Japan.

Food mashups are the norm these days, but that doesn’t mean we weren’t stopped in our tracks when we caught sight of Starbucks’ newest Frappuccino creation. It’s a cherry pie and a Frappuccino all in one Starbucks cup.

Set your sights on the frap that’ll be unleashed in Japan for a limited time starting April 13.

Starbucks
The American Cherry Pie Frappuccino

That’s the American Cherry Pie Frappuccino and it aims to…

Toxic chemicals found in food wrappers and other US fast food packaging

A new study has found that most fast food packages in the US contain fluorinated substances that could be harmful if they seep into the food.

Fluorinated compounds are used to treat the surface of various paper materials in contact with greasy food and is what gives them their anti-soaking, water and fat-repelling properties.

In this new peer-reviewed study, researchers measured the prevalence of a class of fluorinated chemicals, called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAss), in 400 fast food packages from 27 restaurants across the US.

After a spectroscopy-based technique and particle accelerator were used to test the containers for fluorine, the findings – reported in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters – revealed that a third of samples came back positive for fluorine.

Although not proven, researchers believe that part of these could, just like phthalates in plastic packaging, migrate directly into the food and expose consumers to their harmful effects.

Research scientist Laurel Schaider told CNN that “the extent of migration depends on the temperature of the food, the type of food and how long the food is in contact with the paper,” suggesting that the sooner the food is taken out of the packaging, the better.

Animal studies have linked fluorinated chemicals to abnormalities in reproductive functions, cancer and immune suppression, to cite a few.

The level of toxicity of fluorine also varies from one specific type of fluorinated compound to another. Some of them don’t persist for as long in the body, limiting the extent of damage it can cause at any one time.

The amount of fluorine, if any, passing through the food is to be determined, as this study focused on evaluating levels of the compound present in food packaging.

Among samples that tested positive for fluorinated chemicals, 56 percent were from Tex-Mex food packaging and dessert or bread wrappers, 38 percent were for sandwiches and burgers, and 20 percent were in French fries paperboard containers. Paper cups were the only packages to test negative for fluorinated chemicals.

The use of some of the more resistant fluorinated compounds is already partly regulated in the US, and some European countries like Denmark have called to set maximum levels for them in all food packaging.

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Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions
Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison.

This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage.

In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise.

For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against insulin resistance, join the Low Carb Program.

Following pre-diabetes or metabolic disorder, type 2 diabetes can potentially be avoided through diet and exercise.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the hormone insulin is not used effectively by the cells in your body. Insulin is needed for cells to take in glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream and convert it into energy.

Ineffective use of insulin results in the body becoming resistant to insulin – also known as insulin resistance, which in turn causes blood sugar levels to rise (hyperglycemia).

In advanced stages, type 2 diabetes may cause damage to insulin producing cells in the pancreas, leading to insufficient insulin production for your…

Artificial sweetener use up by 200 per cent in the US

The number of children consuming artificial sweeteners has risen by nearly 200 per cent in recent years, a US study shows.

It is the first time researchers have looked at how sweeteners used in food and drink are consumed by the American population.

“The findings are important, especially for children, because some studies suggest a link between low-calorie sweeteners and obesity, diabetes and other health issues,” said lead author Dr Allison Sylvetsky from the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health.

Everyday sweetener consumption

Sylvetsky’s team said that less than nine per cent of young people were eating or drinking aspartame, sucralose and saccharin in 1999.

But that number went up to 25 per cent in 2012 and it is thought that children as young as two are using the sweeteners, which are often found in diet drinks and low-fat processed foods.

Overall, 20 per cent of children reported having some form of sweetener at least once a day.

Sylvetsky said: Just 8.7 per cent of kids reported consuming low-calorie sweeteners in 1999 and 13 years later that number had risen to 25.1 per cent.

“Kids aren’t alone in this trend. More adults also are taking in low-calorie sweeteners in diet soft drinks and in a variety of foods and snack items.”

In fact, their results showed that 44 per cent of adults consume some sort of artificial sweetener once a day and 17 per cent ate or drank a low-calorie sweetener three times a day.

No ‘scientific consensus’

Data of 17,000 people, which was collected from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey from 2009 to 2012, was used as part of the study. The findings were then compared to data which was collected from another survey conducted between 1999 and 2008.

Although the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the safe use of acesulfame-potassium, advantame, aspartame, neotame, saccharin and sucralose, there is concern about how good for people they actually are.

The university said there is still no “scientific consensus” on whether using artificial sweeteners positively impacts the health.

Previous research has suggested they may aid weight loss, but others say they have found evidence to suggest they may lead to piling on the pounds.

A further issue, that we have previously reported, is that many of the studies showing health benefits of sweeteners have been funded by the soft drinks industry itself. This may have therefore introduced a bias towards showing artificial sweeteners to be healthier than they perhaps are.

Sylvetsky highlighted the alternatives people can choose to ensure they are eating the right things, adding: “Drink water instead of soda. Sweeten a serving of plain yoghurt with a little fruit. And don’t forget an apple or another piece of fresh fruit is a great snack for both kids and adults.”

The results were published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions
Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common long-term health conditions

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison.

This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However, the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage.

In recent years, it has become apparent that many people with type 2 diabetes are able to reverse diabetes through methods including low-carb diets, very-low-calorie diets and exercise.

For guidance on healthy eating to improve blood glucose levels and weight and to fight back against insulin resistance, join the Low Carb Program.

Following pre-diabetes or metabolic disorder, type 2 diabetes can potentially be avoided through diet and exercise.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the hormone insulin is not used effectively by the cells in your body. Insulin is needed…

Doing infrastructure right in the U.S.

Infrastructure is the backbone of economic expansion, but its impact hinges not on size and quantity but relevance and quality. President Donald Trump proposes up to $1 trillion over a decade on building roads, bridges, ports, schools and hospitals to make America’s infrastructure “second to none.” Studies indicate how infrastructure spending in advanced economies like the U.S. can boost incomes, but it depends on getting three things right.

First, the additional spending must fill gaps that are holding up the expansion of local economies, rather than just get money out the door. The cracks in infrastructure — especially in Maryland, New Jersey or New York — are glaring. Nationwide, two-thirds of major roads are in poor condition, and a quarter of bridges require major repair. Fixing these problems could create jobs, adding to 14.5 million existing jobs in fields ranging from construction to plant operation.

Note, however, that growth depends not only on physical infrastructure but also education systems, health services and environmental care. The outgoing administration’s stimulus package of $830 billion during 2009–2019 rightly included transport, energy, social sectors and the environment. But it did not focus sharply on growth impediments. Rather, the rationale has been that, during economic downswings, the government can offset the decrease in private spending with more public spending. This approach helped stave off a depression, but it didn’t target growth obstacles like raising worker productivity.

Other countries have tried to raise economic growth through infrastructure spending with mixed results. China put in over 8.5 percent of GDP into infrastructure in the 1990s and 2000s. The country has had its share of bridges to nowhere, white elephants and ghost cities, signifying wasteful…

How U.S. Farm Subsidies Could Be Contributing to the Obesity Epidemic

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay ReporterTUESDAY, July 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Americans get more than half of their daily calories from seven farm foods that are subsidized by the U.S. government, but a new study suggests those subsidies may be contributing to the obesity epidemic.The problem, according to the researchers: The biggest consumers of such food products are also much more likely to be obese, and to struggle with high cholesterol, high inflammation levels, or high blood sugar. The foods include grains, dairy, and livestock products.”We know that eating too many of these foods can lead to obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. However, we still didn’t expect to see such strong results when looking directly at the association between the consumption of subsidized foods and health,” said Edward Gregg. He is chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch in the division of diabetes translation with the U.S. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.Gregg was not a part of the study. But, a team led by his colleague, Karen Siegel, reported the findings in the July 5 online edition of JAMA Internal Medicine.The researchers focused on seven leading commodities covered in the 1973 U.S. Farm Bill. Under that law, producers receive direct financial support from the federal government to grow or raise farm products that include corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, sorghum, dairy and livestock.The goal is to ensure “a plentiful supply of food at reasonable prices,” given that domestic food production accounts for 80% of the food that Americans eat, Gregg explained.The…