Real Talk with Dave: All About the JDRF Type One Nation Summit

Last Sunday, April 22, 2018, I had the amazing opportunity to volunteer at my very first Type 1 event. JDRF hosted their annual Type One Nation Summit in Pasadena as part of the Los Angeles chapter. My goal for this year has been to get more involved in the Diabetic community, so I just knew that I had to reach out and see if I could be a part of this amazing event! I was given the privilege to work with children who also have Type 1 Diabetes, which was such a surreal and eye-opening experience. Also, throughout the day, I was able to meet many new and amazing Diabetics, many of whom I have met through the online community and now was able to meet them in person.

As the day started, I was greeted by some very kind people working the event who helped get me situated and allowed me to find my way around the place. As I walked through the convention center, many different Type 1 brands and companies were there with their very own booths, which allowed us T1Ds to get some more knowledge and have our questions answered. Brands such as Dexcom, Medtronic, OmniPod, Myabetic, and so many others were there with a few very kind reps from each brand. They were all so nice in welcoming quests and helping them find their new favorite T1D brand. I for one was fascinated by the Dexcom booth as they were promoting their latest and greatest device, the Dexcom G6. It was so neat to be able to see the product right then and there as the Dexcom reps were there showing how it works.

As I went to help the children who lived with T1D, I found myself in a room of so many wonderful kids. You would think that these kids would be somewhat down for the fact that they have to live with T1D, but that wasn’t the case at all. The kids I worked with were so happy to be at the event and meet new friends. I would ask them different questions such as how long they have had Type 1 for, what their blood sugars were (and we would compare our numbers with each other), and what devices they use. There was an instant connection with many of the kids as they were so responsive and excited to share. The day went by and they were thrilled to be in this space with each other as they worked on different projects and had different guests come in and talk with them.

Throughout the event, I would go back and forth from the T1D kids to the T1D adults and found myself fascinated with each and every special bond that was formed with one another. I was able to attend a few break-out sessions and listen in on some very interesting panels, some of which I was familiar with the speakers, which made them much more interesting and enjoyable. I must say that whoever put together this event really knew what Diabetes is actually like as they thought of everything to be presented that day. The topics that they talked about were so relatable to people living with Type 1, which made it so special to be a part of. We even got to meet a T1D hero who has been living with Type 1 for 58 years! He was such an inspiration.

As the day went by, more friendships were formed, more amazing T1D brands were discovered with some amazing purposes in the Diabetic community, and all in all, this event was a beautiful space where we could all come together as one big T1D family. Whoever was there was in support of one another and would lift each other up. New people came, but were immediately invited into the group and fit in right away. Many traveled from near and far to be together on this special day for this extra special event, and that right there made me realize how when we stick together as one big T1D family, this disease has nothing on us. We are brave, strong, and true fighters, we won’t give up and we will rise above in times of trouble. Diabetes doesn’t own us.

If you want to get more involved with the T1D community (which I highly recommend, it will definitely change your life for the better), get in contact with your local T1D organizations and be on the lookout for events/meet-ups in your area and just go for it! It just takes one time to get involved and you will be hooked! Being with other Diabetics is contagious and you will want to meet even more Diabetics each time!

 

Live well,

 

Dave

Real Talk with Dave: How to Stay Positive with T1D (Dealing with Burnout)

Have you ever felt overwhelmed with Type 1 Diabetes to the point where you just don’t want to deal with it anymore? You may feel the need to cope with your Diabetes in a different way. Many will go off their Insulin pump for a while and go back to daily syringes/ pen injections as a way to feel a sense of freedom from this disease. Unfortunately, us Diabetics cannot just “stop” Diabetes. We have to fight daily in order to stay alive. We have to take Insulin in different moments throughout the day and watch our blood sugars fluctuate from stubborn highs to difficult lows. At some point, we all go through a burnout phase where T1D just doesn’t feel bearable anymore, that is why I have put together a little guide as to how you can stand up to the burnout phase and keep on pushing through!

1/ Keep a positive mindset – This seems easier said than done, but trust me, in order to feel a positive presence on you as you go about your day, every morning, start the day fresh and new and remind yourself of all your accomplishments in life and how far you have come. Always let yourself know who you are and how brave and strong you are.

2/ Self-talk – Every day is different and some days (as we all know) can be very bad in terms of our Diabetes. There is a lot to think about throughout our day, things such as what our blood sugars may be, what supplies we need to have with us as we go somewhere during the day, and also planning for emergencies, that being said, we must make room for thoughts of reassurance. We need to talk ourselves through a bad low and tell ourselves that everything will be okay, just like it always is. We need to be our own friend who will be there when no one else is. Having positive and calm self-talk is a good way to walk you through your day and be your own hero.

3/ Do what makes you feel alive – we all face Diabetes every moment of everyday, and it can almost feel as though everything is about Diabetes. Sometimes, we may not want to think about Diabetes all the time (within reason), that is why we need to make time for other things in life that bring us true joy and help take our minds off of T1D for a bit. Doing something you love, such as going out with friends, playing a sport, or spending time with family can be the very thing that can help you cope with T1D burnout.

4/ Take a pump holiday – Though it may be difficult to keep your blood sugars in your normal range, taking a break from wearing your Insulin pump (if you wear one) can make you feel free and have one less thing constantly reminding you of your Diabetes. You can do this for a day, a week, or even a whole month, it’s really up to you. However long you need to take a break from wearing your pump, go for it, because what some don’t realize is that wearing a pump can change a person and mess with their emotions (in some cases) to the point where they feel “different”, which isn’t that case at all. Wearing a pump is a blessing and is what essentially keeps us alive each and every day.

5/ Accept your struggle – Just know that eventually, this T1D burnout phase you may be going through will go away and you will be able to get back in the game. Remember, we ALL face burnout periods in our life, but guess what? We all get over them eventually. Accepting the fact that you are stressed out, annoyed, and tired of T1D is sometimes what we need to get over that phase. Sometimes, just feeling the sadness you are going through is important and perfectly okay, because when you feel it, you work through it. It’s all one big learning process on how to cope with your thoughts and emotions. At the end of the day, we’re all humans. Diabetic or not, we go through tough life situations and working through them is just one way to grow as a person and be able to allow for empathy towards others going through difficult life situations.

6/ You are not alone – When you feel like all things are going wrong with your Diabetes, a great way to vent off and work through it all is turning to the amazing T1D community that is out there, waiting to help out in any way. Connecting with others (in person or online via social media) can help you as you will soon realize that you are not the only one dealing with burnout at the moment and that you can fight T1D together. This has been especially helpful to me as I was in a dark place for a while until I turned to the community for help and support. Now, I am at the happiest place I have ever been with my Diabetes and I realized that T1D is not all that bad.

7/ Live your life! – I get it, T1D is a horrible disease. But just remember, you are bigger, better, and stronger than T1D. Remember to smile through it all, laugh daily, and be kind to others. Make life how you want and always choose to stay actively positive, because when you are positive, whether you’re high or low, you will have motivation and strength to keep on going and T1D will just be one of those things in life we end up getting used to. When we feel like we’ve mastered T1D, we’ll be able to accept what’s on our plate at the moment.

I truly hope these tips and tricks on how to cope with T1D burnout helped you out if you are feeling this at the moment. It’s okay to be frustrated at times, but be sure to never stay in that phase forever. Life is too short to stay in a bad place with your Diabetes.

Live well,

Dave

Moving for Your Body

Let’s be real, working out can suck. Like really, really suck.


Growing up, running was always my punishment for the other sports I played (tennis, volleyball, and softball). We would run if we missed, run if we lost, etc. Running was never something I got to do, but had to do, rather. I’d had a distorted view of working out (outside of playing sports competitively) and I saw working out as punishment for what I ate, etc.

By pushing my body too hard, at the age of 21, I’ve already had shoulder surgery, five stress fractures in both my shins and lumbar spine, as well as four cortisone injections. So after years of putting my body through intense workouts to train, I am finally working out to heal my body and mind.

So what shifted in my love-hate relationship with “movement”? My mindset. While I used to view running, cycling, swimming as the enemy or the “worst part” of training, I now view it as something I GET to do. I get to move my body, as quickly or slowly as I please. I get to be outside. I get an hour to move how I want to– however feels good for my body. 

I used to push myself through a run when I could hardly walk, or through shin splints on a long run, now I don’t. Now, I run or bike when I want, put on a great playlist, and enjoy the movement, the celebration of what my body CAN do. I practice yoga daily because it is sustainable for me, and I love the mental and physical reset it provides for me. I focus on how it feels, what I need, and am very consious of my blood glucose levels when working out.

My advice to those who have a distorted view of gyms or physical activity, or even just need motivation to start working out is to find something you love, that you can sustain. Maybe for you this is dance, yoga, boxing, a long walk– or a multitude of act ivies combined.

“Speak like you love yourself. Eat like you love yourself. Move like you love yourself.”

Real Talk with Dave: Trusting Your Gut

When first diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, we are told how we will feel. Doctors and nurses come in and tell us what we may experience when we are faced with a low or a high blood sugar, but that’s about it. Mind you most of these medical professionals are NOT Diabetic, which means that they don’t truly know what Diabetes “feels” like. Not only are we not able to fully know what symptoms of T1D feel like until we experience them on our own, but we are never actually mentally prepared for how life is going to feel like from now on, from the good times, to the not so good moments. How we know how Diabetes is exactly like is by simply living with it and experiencing all the possible situations on our own time.

For example, in the hospital, a doctor would typically educate you on low and high symptoms (shakiness, headache, fast heartbeat, etc.), but that doctor doesn’t actually know what it genuinely feels like. When we are faced with our first low blood sugar as a Type 1 Diabetic, it can be a real shocker in the sense that we are not expecting it to feel the way it actually does.

I can remember my very first low when I was essentially “on my own”. I had just gone back to school (6th grade) two weeks after being diagnosed and hadn’t fully understood how important carbohydrates were when on Insulin. I went to lunch that day and didn’t like the bread on the sandwich I was eating, so I decided to not eat the bread and eat the protein inside the sandwich instead, as I thought I was being healthy. Of course, shortly after lunch and having not eaten the carbs I took Insulin for, I had a very bad low. The sweats, shaking, and fast heart beat were so prominent in that low of mine and I needed a friend to walk me to the nurse’s office, where I was given some apple juice to quickly bring my sugar levels back up. Scary, I know, but that was necessary as I then learned why this happened and how to prevent it from happening again.

Trusting your gut is key in living with T1D. You may have just checked your blood sugar minutes before and had a good number. Minutes later, you feel a bit funny but don’t think you could have gone low (or high) in such a short amount of time, but then, you do. You listen to your gut and trust your feelings and, you guessed it, a low. Had you not trusted your own gut, you could have been in for a really bad experience. This can happen in a variety of different situations as a Type 1 Diabetic. You can feel low symptoms when you are actually just fine. You can feel as though your blood sugar is high, when actually, you’re low. Knowing your body and how you feel when certain situations arise can be the thing that saves your life.

Nowadays, we have Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs) that tell us what our blood sugars are and where they’re headed, which can give us peace of mind as we go about our day, but can also create anxiety as we can see when we may be going severely low or high at a bad time (work, school, meetings, etc.). Though we can see our blood sugar readings being updated every few minutes, we should not rely on the level of accuracy 100% of the time. Often times, the readings on our CGMs can be way off. That is why we must trust our gut and know our bodies. Every now and then, I may find my CGM readings to be about 100 points off of what my actual blood sugar is, which is extremely dangerous. That just comes to show, always be the one in control of your body and your feelings. You can only depend on yourself to determine how you are truly feeling, and when you do, there is a level of peace in knowing that you were able to catch a bad Diabetic feeling before it caused an emergency.

 So always remember, YOU are in control of how you feel. Not your CGM, not your Doctor, but you.

Live well,

 

Dave

Real Talk With Dave: The Importance of Wearing a Medical ID

Wearing a form of medical ID can be the factor that can potentially save your life. As a Type 1 Diabetic, it is important that we wear some type of medical ID at all times (especially when out alone in public). When we go out into the world and live our lives, we may often times face situations that we might not have control over. Thankfully, we have devices to hopefully help us be in the know at all times with our Diabetes, such as a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), but still, at times, we may experience severe situations with our blood sugars that may result in an emergency.

Without getting too deep into a dark topic (as I am sure we all already know about), I do have to say, there is always a danger, regardless, when it comes to Diabetes. Let’s be real, T1D is considered a “disease” which does have some pretty serious consequences such as really high blood sugars (ending up in DKA) or severe low blood sugars to the point where we may pass out or go into a coma. These are fears none of us want to think about, but somehow, they’re always on our minds. Fear. Something that takes over when diagnosed with T1D. There is nothing to worry about though! We are all on top of our Diabetes and know all the potential risk factors, we just have to be aware and plan ahead.

Where does the role of medical ID come in? Well, say we do experience a medical emergency, if we are alone but are wearing some form of medical ID, such as a bracelet, necklace, ring, tattoo, or ever a simple wallet card, that will help the general public/paramedics know what may have caused the emergency and they can help out as much as possible in saving our lives as they will know what actions they need to take, as essentially, time is everything in an emergency.

I guess you could say that medical ID is more for someone to be able to reference in the case of an emergency. Either way, it will give you the assurance and peace of mind in knowing that you will be taken care of properly in the case of an emergency.

I know that you may not want to wear a medical ID all the time, as it may make you feel “labeled” as a Diabetic, and trust me, I have felt that way at some point in my life, however, so many amazing brands have created casual and modern medical ID jewelry that can go with just about anything on any day. You have to find what your style is and what you feel most comfortable wearing. Once you do so, you will be able to wear your ID wherever you go, feeling confident and safe all the time!

Live your life and don’t let T1D slow you down one bit! All you have to do is take a few simple steps towards your safety as a Diabetic and you will be good to go!

Live well,

 

Dave

 

 

 

Real Talk with Dave: Tips and Tricks on Making Peace with your Diabetes

All Diabetics know how difficult it can be to find a common ground with their Diabetes daily, between the highs, the lows, the fears, and the pain, however, at some point, this can lead to a burn-out phase in our Diabetic lives, making it much harder to keep on moving forward. At the start of the new year, I have almost gained a new mindset for my Diabetes in which I am a bit more relaxed, knowing that it will all be okay in the end, that is why I want to share some of my own personal tips and tricks on how I manage my Diabetic stress & anxiety in the best way possible.

Over the past 9 years of living with T1D, I have come to realized that Diabetes is a really hard thing to go through in life, but finding ways to cope with your Diabetes as much as possible can be so rewarding in the long run! Don’t do Diabetes alone. Find a group of people to lift you up and motivate you to keep up the hard work you do! Diabetes is already a stressful thing to deal with, that is why these three helpful tips I use daily may help in finding a light at the end of the Diabetic tunnel:

1) Plan ahead – When out and about with T1D, many times you may not want to even think about Diabetes and don’t want it to get in the way of your outing, no matter where you are headed, however, always being prepared for the worst is the best way to avoid any unwanted stress, as T1D is a serious disease that needs to be treated and cared for 24/7. Just imagine how it would feel to be an hour or more away from your house, all to realize you forgot your Insulin at home… and your blood sugar is high (that wouldn’t be fun). In that case, I definitely recommend making a checklist (yes, an actual list) where you list all the necessary items that have top priority in managing your Diabetes on any outing, whether at school, work, and especially on a vacation. Each time you plan on going somewhere, be sure to check off the list prior to your outing and make sure you have all you need, and maybe even some extra supplies, all packed in a designated pouch or bag in which you can transport quickly on your way out. Better to be over prepared and over packed than the other way around.

2) Self-talk – One thing that I still struggle with is being in a constant fear of going low or excessively high when I am in a space (such as school) in which I cannot get out of very easily or am surrounded by many others who may not be aware of my T1D. In cases like these, I feel as though it is strictly up to me to take care of myself and make sure I am okay at all times, but, as we all know, Diabetes is an unpredictable disease. We all wish to never have lows or highs at certain times, but they can honestly happen whenever, wherever. In that case, let it be. If you go low, treat. If you go high, treat. Yes, you may have a bit of anxiety in having to deal with that all alone sometimes, but it is more important that you treat and take care of yourself, rather than the horrible outcomes of a severe high or low. The theory of self-talk comes into place by you having to mentally think to yourself that everything is going to be just fine. Think how you’ve been low and high before and made it out just fine each time, some were more difficult than others, but somehow, you managed to survive it… and like a pro!

3) Finding a support system – Most of the work I do in the Diabetic community is done via Instagram, @type1livabetic, where I try and encourage other T1D’s to look at life in a positive light and make life any way they want, regardless of their Diabetes. I didn’t always have that intention though. During my first few years as a Diabetic, I didn’t fully feel motivated or see the positive side to Diabetes as I do now. How did I overcome that? Well, I began to find other Diabetics via social media and just…talk! I began to connect with them and start talking with others on the true daily struggles we face and the feeling of connecting with someone who simply understands EVERYTHING you are feeling is indescribable. I found my support group online, but there are many other ways to do so. There are many in-person support groups at local hospitals, nowadays, a new trend is hosting a Diabetic meet-up, and simply attending a local Diabetic organization research walk or event can be life-changing and memorable.

In short, if you want to find peace with your Diabetes, give these three tips a try! Always have your medical supplies (and a backup plan) ready and with you in an accessible manner at all times, remember to think only good thoughts to yourself, especially in the hardest times, and find a group of people that you can be 100% yourself around, Diabetic and all, and hang on for the ride, because Diabetes is a huge roller coaster with many ups and downs. Find what brings you peace with your Diabetes and go with it!

Live well,

Dave

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breast Cancer Warrior Thankful for Early Detection

I am a 70-year-old wife, mother, grandmother and university administrator. My cancer journey began October of 2014 with my annual mammogram followed by the mail notice of an abnormality and the ultrasound to check it out.   I was alone in my office when I got the dreaded call from my doctor telling me it was cancer and that I would need to find a surgeon.

After the initial jolt, I picked up the phone, called my husband and made it real by telling him the terrifying news. I tried to minimize the severity by telling him my doctor said it was small, we got it early, and that I likely could get away with a lumpectomy. I have no history of breast cancer in my family.  

Since it was now almost Christmas, I made the decision to tell only immediate family and deal with everything after the Holidays. So we made it through dinners, parties, Santa and all the fun with the diagnosis hanging in the background like Scrooge. And did I say there were tears…..lots of tears.

The first part of January, I saw a surgeon.  He explained that I could have a lumpectomy or a “mastectomy”– the word took my breath away. No one had talked about a mastectomy. He explained with a lumpectomy came radiation and with radiation came difficulties with reconstruction and increased risks of other cancers. Radiation was a must according to the standard of care.  Mind you, this was a very kind qualified doctor doing his job but delivering news that I was not prepared to hear.

I am a take charge person so for the next month, I visited doctors and plastic surgeons, visited with friends and friends of friends who had gone through breast cancer, researched on the internet to the wee hours of the morning, read studies, sent my doctor daughter in Seattle studies to interrupt in the middle of her 80 hour a week residency, drove my husband crazy with the what ifs, and railed against the forces in the universe that brought me to this untenable spot.  

I was having an incredibly hard time accepting that I really did have cancer and that I was going to have to make a decision about how to deal with it.  

When visiting blogs at 2 AM, it became apparent that I was not the only one out there in my predicament. Many women were doing the same thing trying to sift through all the information by themselves and come up with the decision that worked for them.

As I tell this story, keep it mind it is MY story. Not all woman chose to deal with the diagnosis as I did.  There are many types of treatment options and many types of breast cancer.  It is confusing at best and paralyzing at worst.

At the end of all my research, I decided a unilateral mastectomy with reconstruction was best for me given my fear of the side effects of radiation.  So, on March 9th  2014, I had a relatively new nipple and skin sparing mastectomy which leaves the outer part of the breast intact allowing for a good reconstruction outcome.  The pathology report came back with the great news: I had the “best type of cancer” if you must have cancer and would not need radiation or chemo.

The next three months were tougher than I imagined both physically and especially emotionally. June 1st was the reconstruction day and for the short term the end of the physical journey.  Healing has gone well and results are good.  The emotional journey continues, however.  The grief process is one that takes a little more time and doesn’t move in a linear fashion.  You go through the stages of shock, anger, sadness, and acceptance but not necessarily in that order.  I have entered the stage of acceptance– but on any given day anger and sadness can reappear. I know, however, acceptance is where I want and need to be for my continued healing and well- being.  

I am a stronger, more empathic person because of my breast cancer journey and try to be a spokesperson where ever possible to push the importance of mammograms for early detection.  

Medicine has come so far in what can be done both with the surgeries and the drug therapies for women with breast cancer. I pray my daughters and granddaughters will not have to go through what I have. But if you happen to find that you are one of the unlucky one in eight that end up with breast cancer, there are treatments and options and a marvelous life after cancer if you detect it early.

 

Naturally Sweet



I think it is safe to say that we Diabetics are naturally sweet, but what does that really mean? Well for starters, the saying, “naturally sweet”, can mean an array of things.

Most non-Diabetics will hear the term “Diabetes” and think of people who ate too much sugar or are overweight, but we all know that’s not the case. People will assume that Diabetics cannot consume any sugar or they will die, again, not the case.

Over time, we endure so many different assumptions, labels, and hurtful comments towards our Diabetes that honestly don’t feel good to hear. I’m 20 years old and have had Diabetes for 9 years and still get those comments from non-Diabetics. When I was first diagnosed, those comments didn’t affect me. Fast forward to today, I have educated myself and lived/experienced so much in my Diabetic journey to the point where now, I truly cannot tolerate hurtful assumptions people may say to me or near me. I’m not just speaking for myself. The whole Diabetic community has expressed their frustrations and experiences on dealing with people who viewed them as the stereotypical Diabetic. Some of those comments include: “oh, did you get Diabetes from eating too much sugar?”, “Diabetics can’t eat sugar.”, or “you don’t look Diabetic”. These are just some examples and trust me, I’ve heard much worse.

We are getting so close to the end for Type 1 Diabetes and living out a normal and healthy life has become so much easier and much more manageable due to all the advanced forms of technology, specialized medicine, and even just by spreading awareness and building a community.

The typical stereotypes should not determine our future or our own individual decisions. We can eat sugar. We can do whatever we put our minds to.

And we are so much more capable of doing things that we want to nowadays due to all the advancements that allow us to do so.

Diabetics work hard each day just to stay alive. I think sometimes we all can get carried away and take life for granted, but when you really think about how critical and complex Diabetes management truly is, that in itself can be the main motivator in your life to keep you going.

My point right now is that we are naturally sweet for all these reasons. We are hard-working, focused and motivated, and in it to win it (it being a cure!). We are sweet because we can not only be of an assistance to other Diabetics by creating a kind and inviting environment but at the end of the day, when you look back at all you went through that day and how you took care of yourself, good or bad, you’re simply…sweet!

So go ahead, make a change in this world, prove them wrong, eat that sugary donut or ice cream (with Insulin of course!), because, with that natural fighting spirit we Diabetics are given, we can do literally… ANYTHING!

Live well,

Dave

Lyfebulb’s End of Summer Drinks!

Last Thursday we enjoyed an evening of Champagne, courtesy of Prestige des Sacres, cocktails made with be-mixed mixers, cookies to go from KNOW foods, and of course some wonderful food, service, and the prime location of a Lyfebulb favorite, Brasserie Ruhlmann.

We want to thank everyone who came out and showed what an incredibly strong community we are proud to be a part of. Our goal is always to improve the quality of life of those living with chronic illness in general, and type 1 diabetes in particular.

We hope that you will consider making a donation to the Lyfebulb Foundation to help fund future gatherings such as last week’s and to support patient entrepreneurship. Together we can make a difference in the lives of patients everywhere!

Real Talk With Dave: Cruising with Confidence

When I first began driving, I was about 17 years old and all I wanted was to be free and independent, allowing me to feel like a mature and responsible adult. I knew that I had this extra thing to deal with and worry about. However I didn’t want my Diabetes to stand in the way of me learning and trying something new. I pushed and trained myself to think first and make my own decisions that would benefit my safety and wellness over all. The first encounter I had with T1D and driving happened shortly after getting my license where I had just checked my blood sugar before leaving my house, had a perfect and safe number, and then just 5 minutes into driving, I felt shaky and kinda funny. Immediately, I thought that I must have been low, so trusting my instincts, I pulled over, checked my BG, and I was right, a low number. So without panicking, I drank some juice, called my mom to let her know just for piece of mind (for the both of us), and waited about 5-10 minutes until I felt much better and stronger. Once I checked my blood sugar and saw that I was back in control, I began to drive again. It just takes a few of these minor experiences to allow you to feel confident in driving with your Diabetes as you would know the right actions to take if something like this were to happen again.

While driving is something we all fantasize about doing when we are young, when it comes to Type 1 Diabetes, there are some things to think about before getting behind the wheel.

Before you get behind the wheel, make sure to think of all the possible scenarios in which your Diabetes can take a toll on you and have a back up plan. For example, always have back up Diabetes supplies in your car in case of an emergency. Say your pump site somehow rips out of your body as you are commuting to work or on an outing with friends, you can easily pull over and park in the nearest parking lot and change out your site (wouldn’t you be glad you thought of it before hand?). What I like to do personally is have a small medical bag stored somewhere safely in my car filled with a back up supply of pump sites, test strips, syringes, glucose tablets, lancets, batteries, etc. This way, I am ready for any tricks my Diabetes may decide to play on me! Something else that has been a true lifesaver and has given me peace as I drive has been my Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) and I can’t even express how nice it is to just see where my blood sugars are as I drive and where they’re headed, allowing me to gage my time and plan ahead.

The most important thing to think about is how your blood sugars can affect your driving. If your blood sugars go below 70 mg/dL or above 300 mg/dL, that can be as dangerous as drunk driving as your reaction time and though process is delayed and slowed down quite a bit. I would recommend always making sure to check your blood sugars before your turn on the car to ensure you’ll be safe along the way. Planning ahead can be quite helpful. I know that may sound easier said than done, because we’re human. Life is unpredictable, so if you do have to drive somewhere unexpectedly in the case of an emergency, perhaps planning ahead wouldn’t be an option. However, having your own personalized back up plan can be a big help and reduce so much of the stress of driving. Driving can already be a stressful thing in itself, and Diabetes can add on lots of stress, so you should go whatever you possibly can do to eliminate that stress! Safety is the way to go, because not only are you responsible for your own life, you’re responsible for all the lives around you on the road.

I can remember countless times in which my blood sugars were all out of whack and my mind was foggy and unclear, so if I was with other people who knew how to drive, I would ask them if they could drive for me since it was unsafe for me to get behind the wheel and be responsible for their own lives.

Don’t stress driving with Diabetes. Think of it as when you first learned to ride a bike, you fell a few times most likely, but you didn’t give up, tried again, and ended up riding like a pro! Driving with Diabetes is the same thing, you may have a few complications every now and then, but eventually, managing your Diabetes in the car will be just as easy as turing the radio on to your favorite song! I don’t even stress it anymore and I am comfortable driving, all while managing my Diabetes. Of course I still take the appropriate precautions, I just don’t let it get the best of me! And you shouldn’t either!

So go ahead, get in your car and cruise with confidence!

Live well,

Dave

Real Talk With Dave: Diabetes is NOT a Diet

When first diagnosed, it may seem as though you are on a diet that is going to restrict you from eating what you once loved. But that is not the case what so ever! On the day when Diabetes comes crashing into your life and presents itself as the worst thing yet, one may feel confused as to what this disease is like and how certain foods will affect you and your daily routine.

When I was first diagnosed back in 2008, I remember feeling scared to eat because what was once an easy thing to do completely turned into a complicated challenge in which I had to measure all my food, eat a balanced meal with the proper nutrients, and calculate the carb and insulin ratios. Before I was diagnosed, I remember having the biggest sweet tooth out there and when the day of my diagnosis came, I felt like that was instantly taken away from me, all to realize that wasn’t the case, at all.

I know that after going to the Endocrinologist for years, they tend to lecture you and make you feel that you should always be eating the proper foods, but every now and then, a cheat day is necessary in order to live a happy (and healthy) lifestyle. If not, burnout can happen from trying to eat all the right foods all the time. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t care for your diet and watch what you eat, but remember, Type 1 Diabetes is most commonly found in children, teens, and young adults who every now and then just need a cheat day or some time to not feel deprived of the foods they once ate freely. Yes, you do need to be as healthy as possible to avoid Diabetic complications later in life, you just need to find balance between your diet and exercise pattern. When you do, you can eat what you like, along with a healthy diet that is best of you.

I went through a stage in my life in which I chose the path of a crash diet in which I would not even touch foods that were high in sugar or where unhealthy and processed. I was a little too careful with my diet and was missing the big picture. I remember at one point, I had it with this diet and missed eating the foods that I used to eat. After some reconsideration, I though to myself how I can still choose to live a happy and healthy lifestyle, all while eating “junk food” in moderation from time to time, as well as not worrying too much on how my numbers were and trying to make them perfect. That wasn’t living.

And I wanted to live, not for the future, but for the present.

I wanted to enjoy each day without living in fear of trying to eat the right foods and have, what I thought were, perfect blood sugars. Yeah I was healthy, but I wasn’t all that happy.

Every now and then you come to a point where you will have to decide what type of lifestyle you truly want, depending on your personality and current situation. Diabetes can be tough when you try and over plan and set limits to yourself. Finding a common balance between what you eat and how it affects you can help when trying to regulate your Diabetes as a whole. It is a lot of work and there will be periods of time in which it is mostly trial and error by simply seeing what works best with your blood sugars, but when you finally feel as though you have figured it out, it will truly feel amazing! You can do it all, eat what you want, not restrict yourself all the time, but just eat in moderation the foods that may not be the stereotypical diet for a Diabetic.

So go ahead, eat that ice cream. And enjoy it. Because even with T1D, you CAN eat ice cream.

Live well,

Dave

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