fbpx

Merging Family with Applied Science: My Diabetes Story

Throughout my life, I’ve been surrounded by many family members who have fought or are currently fighting diabetes. I’m from Vietnam, where education on healthy lifestyles and an emphasis on preventive health is almost nonexistent. In my culture we consume white rice, French baguette as a main dish, and sugar cane Coke — which is as common as water. Partially because of this, along with genetics at play, my mother was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes almost a decade ago. Three years later, her older brother (my uncle) endured kidney problems and passed away from diabetic complications. Meanwhile, my other aunt and uncle on my mother’s side are both prediabetic and at serious risk for developing the disease. 

The distance from my family — and their health —  is hard. One way I stay connected to them (aside from visits across oceans and conference calls) is through my company, Bonbouton, a preventive medicine startup that is currently focused on developing products for diabetic patients. This decision to focus first on diabetes was solidified when the disease made its way even closer to home: My wife developed Gestational diabetes in the U.S. when she was pregnant with both of our boys, now 7 and 2.5 years old.

Bonbouton is developing a smart insole that can detect foot ulcers in diabetic patients before they form, reducing the risk of amputation. (200 people a day lose a toe or a foot due to diabetic-related ulceration.) I developed and patented the insole’s sensing technology in school while pursuing a doctorate in chemical engineering. 

Throughout my life, in addition to family, I’ve always been motivated by applied science. I never excelled in scientific research but was always interested in how to apply science to various applications and figure out ways to inject the technology into products that help people. Watching my mother, aunts and uncles, and wife battle diabetes was a driving force for me: I wanted to figure out a way to tie the two together. 

Another life changing event occurred in 2015 was my dad passed away from stage 4 colorectal cancer, a disease the doctors caught too late. Enough was enough: I didn’t want to see anyone get diagnosed too late anymore. I wanted to commit to preventive health, early detection, and patient empowerment. I wanted to create sensing tools that help people better understand their health so they can take action and maintain wellbeing. 

In fact, that’s the exact vision of Bonbouton: to sense the invisible and enable every human to live a healthier life.

Although there are several causes for the different types of diabetes, being autoimmune, inflammation, lifestyle, and genetics —the symptoms and complications remain similar, and that is what we care most about.Whether Gestational, Type 1, or Type 2, they each render similar lifestyle issues: one when you’re wondering what’s going on inside your body. When there’s so much to maintain, so many boxes to check. Having developed the empathy from my family, I wanted to build my life and career around sensing and healing. The way forward for me is my work as an entrepreneur with Bonbouton.

New Workout App for People With Diabetes – And Christel is an Instructor!

Have you ever dreamt of working out with a trainer who understands diabetes, who might even live with diabetes, and who gets what it takes to get through a workout without wonky blood sugars?

Well, that trainer could be me!

Today, my 12-week fitness program “STRONGER”, that I developed for GlucoseZone, is available in the GlucoseZone app. I’d like to personally invite you to come train with me. To join me for a program that will push you to be a stronger version of yourself.

Sign up HERE and use the “STRONGER” code to get 30% off your monthly subscription

The beauty of joining GlucoseZone is that you’ll get access to not only my program but to 6 other exercise programs, as well as live workouts, all developed specifically for people living with diabetes. You can do all of the workouts in your own home or bring it to the gym.

Regardless of your fitness level, you can find qualified instructors to take you through the workouts that are right for you, and always with your diabetes in mind.

One of the reasons why I’m so excited about working with GlucoseZone is that it’s the first-ever clinically validated digital exercise therapeutic for people living with diabetes, and it’s endorsed by the American Diabetes Association.

Stronger Getting Started

Sign up HERE and use the “STRONGER” code to get 30% off the monthly retail (You’ll only pay $9.09 per month) when you sign up for the GlucoseZone app.

 

Connect with Christel on Facebook: @DiabetesStrong; Instagram: @diabetesstrong_ig.

Wearing a Diabetes Medical ID On-The-Go!

Medical ID Bracelets

Living life on-the-go can be fun and busy, however, doing so with a chronic illness requires a few extra steps and planning along the way.

 

Hi, my name is David and I have been living with Type 1 Diabetes for 10 years now. I was diagnosed at the age of 11 and let me tell you… I have been through a lot. In living with this disease, I have been able to experience so much and learn from my mistakes. In doing so, I have come to realize that as a diabetic, I am one of those who should wear a medical ID and why it’s important for all life’s experiences.

For years on end, I never wore a medical ID bracelet. I could never find a bracelet that I simply liked or wanted to wear daily. When I became a part of the Diabetic Online Community (DOC) back in 2014, I was exposed to several different people who shared the same struggle. I also saw a variety of amazing brands and companies who understand this struggle and have found ways to make ID bracelets, dog tags, necklaces, and more so much nicer and pleasing to the eye and the patient. I own several different medical ID bracelets, I think when one finds their style with Diabetes, it’s always nice to have options and create your own look, which is why owning multiple forms of emergency ID that go with different looks is a great idea!

I have mentioned several times on my Instagram, @type1livabetic, that when wearing my personalized Paracord bracelet from American Medical ID, I felt so very safe. I felt as though if anything Diabetes related could go wrong, I would be prepared. On my engraved bracelet, my name, condition, and emergency contact information were all located on a small piece of metal, attached to the Paracord bracelet. At a recent trip to Disneyland with a large group of people who also had Type 1 Diabetes that could vouch for me if there were to be an emergency, I still encountered times in which I was alone at the park (walking to and from my car, walking to meet the attendees, or simply stepping to the side to grab a snack), rest assured, I was confident with my Diabetes at the time.

So why is it so important to wear a form of medical alert jewelry for Diabetes? Well, not to get too dark or technical, however, the fact remains that we do have Type 1 Diabetes that does come with some symptoms and consequences. If our blood sugar drops significantly low, we could pass out and become unconscious or go into a coma. Same with high blood sugar, if we are severely high and go into DKA, we could in fact experience some symptoms that could limit our ability to function, which can prevent us from acting in the moment to get help. Say you were in public, alone, and you experienced one of these symptoms, if you were wearing a medical ID, someone nearby would mostly likely come to check for various hints or signs on you if something doesn’t look entirely right and search for an alert jewelry in particular sites on the body: wrists, around the neck, tattoos, etc.

In being diagnosed with any chronic disease and being told you have to take extra care of yourself can be a lot, however, allowing yourself some relief by wearing a form of ID can truly reduce a lot of the stress surrounded by various diseases. One should never leave the house without some form of ID as you never know when these emergencies could happen.

American Medical ID Healthy Packing List

The CDC includes having a form of medical identification such as alert bracelets, necklaces, or wallet cards as part of a healthy travel packing list.

I believe that some may also feel safe in knowing that they have a medical ID card in their wallet as well, for added peace of mind. One should also wear a form of ID at home, just in case. For those who live alone, I understand that it may feel as though you are not in need of wearing an ID at home as you will be alone, but that could just be the very tool that can keep you alive, say you have an emergency, it could be that neighbor walking by and seeing something isn’t right that could barge in and save your life and being able to identify you have a particular medical condition that needs attention.

We each have our own busy lives that takes up so much time and mental focus away from our health, which is why wearing medical alert jewelry can protect us as we are on the move, daily. School, work, the playground, a coffeeshop, wherever you may be, ID is necessary. No matter how old the patient is, whether a child, teen, adult, or elder, wearing a medical ID all the time can protect us from the dangers of our diseases and more.

 

Live well,

David

To End The Weekend In A Perfect Way

The human body is an incredible thing. Yes, it can fall apart and let you down, but it also holds amazing minds that dream up things like insulin and glucose pills that can save someone’s life and help you work around the parts of your body that can’t keep up anymore.

Weight isn’t everything — health is. I grew up battling an eating disorder and now that my focus is on health, and not weight, I feel much more connected to my body. It’s like meeting an old friend I haven’t talked to in a long time (and we have a lot to catch up on). Having to count, track and balance every bit of food or drink that goes in my body is definitely a trigger for me, but I’m getting to know what food makes my body healthy now.

It’s okay to be sad and let go.

There is no perfect health zone. There will be days when I can’t “beat” diabetes no matter what and there will be days when I need to treat myself and not focus on only eating things I know I can control well. Life needs little moments like that to stay sane and right now, the only path to staying happy I can see is one that embraces ups and downs and doesn’t try to turn them into a perfect straight road.

Last and most importantly: LIFE CHANGES. It is important to remember. Life looks and will not look the same even though we have a disease that will need the same type of treatment.

15 Ways to Thrive With Type 1 Diabetes

By: Yerachmiel Altman I achieved 57 years of living with type 1 diabetes this year! I was diagnosed just one month after my 2nd birthday and have logged half a million hours of living with type 1 to this day! I want to share with you the tips and knowledge I’ve acquired through my top 15 tips living and working with diabetes. Hopefully you find these as useful as I have. Remember that everyone has a different way of treating their disease so don’t worry if some of these tips don’t apply to you!

1. Put your mind into it.

If you focus on what’s important to your health, it opens up wider possibilities than thought before.

2. Don’t judge yourself

3. Don’t compare yourself to others.

4. Its not your fault.

You didn’t choose to have diabetes, it chose you!

5. Make smart choices everyday

Diabetes self-care is all about choices. Human minds create over 35,000 choices about every five seconds.

6. Don’t wait for the cure.

Ever have someone talk about the “cure in five years” ? Do your best to control diabetes to best of your ability.  Monitoring your diabetes will only lead to better health and a longer, happier life with hopefully less complications. This will help to leave you in improved conditions to be eligible for breakthrough treatments when they ARE available.

7. No your way or the highway thinking.

Don’t think the way you are doing it is the best or only way.  Always read, research and try (under medical supervision) different ways of treatment, wellness, and care. Listen to those around you.

8. Know thyself and thy diet.

Always learn as much as possible about your own self.  Everyone has certain foods that for themselves don’t follow the standard “curve” (and/or standard “carb count”).

9. Find your niche and your system.

Each person has to find the system or methods that work best for them.

10. Get Techy

Technology has given us many many modern inventions which aid in our control and understanding of diabetes – you have determine which of them works best for you and which ones aren’t as helpful.

11. Find a mentor. Find a community.

Vitally important to have others who are type 1 and similar in length and type of diabetes as well as and other life factors.  It is also important to have a “mentor”; someone else to ask questions of.  Having another person to ask or to bounce ideas off of can many times resolve issues before they become problems.  Additionally long term use of equipment gets us into habits  –  having others to ask may open doors we didn’t even know existed.

12. Pay it forward: spread your knowledge to others!

It is very important once one has learned enough to help others.  It is both really helpful for the other people AND very good for yourself.

13. Surround yourself with love

Always have family and friends who lift you up, and help guide you through the tough times that come with being a T1D patient. There is always hope!

14. Open up

Diabetes doesn’t have to be a secret, share with others about your disease. Sometimes it can be hard to talk about your chronic illness but with more awareness comes more acceptance. However you always know how much is safe or okay to disclose,you are never obligated to tell people or only focus on your disease. You’re a multidimensional person!

15. Enjoy Life!! You CAN live a joyous and fulfilling life with diabetes!

Top Five Wellness Tips We Learned From Lauren Bongiorno!

At Lyfebulb, we’re SO lucky to have Lauren Bongiorno on our T1D Lyfebulb Ambassador Team! Her expertise in countless areas related to self empowerment, fitness, nutrition and health is what makes her such a great influencer. We can all learn a thing or two from Lauren’s expertise!

Today we’re highlighting some of Lauren’s best wellness tips from  IG to share with you today. Her advice is relatable to everyone living with a chronic illness, T1D patients, or  even those interested in creating a well-balanced life.

Check her out at LaurenBongiorno.com !

TIP 1: PENCIL IN VACATION WORKOUT SESSIONS TO KEEP BALANCED

TIP 2: ENJOY YOUR VACATION: DON’T THINK ABOUT “EARNING YOUR MEAL”

View this post on Instagram

HERE’S THE TRUTH: I aways work out on vacation so I can be less strict about what I eat. yeeeeeppppp. For me it’s not about burning calories/ earning my meal, but with being able to eat waffles, risotto, pizza, tropical fruit, truffle fries without my blood sugars roller coastering all over the place. Sure it would be easier to cook all my meals in the room or only order fish and vegetables out, but i want the freedom to indulge if that’s what I want. For someone like me with #typeonediabetes, if i’m not working out, eating these foods would spike my blood sugar real fast and it would take hours to get it down. When this happens I feel so tired, moody, killer headache… not fun. I feel 10000x better strategically structuring my workouts to support a little more flexibility on vacation. Also, I had 2 waffles for breakfast, pancakes, eggs, + a croissant and it was 💯. The end.

A post shared by LAUREN BONGIORNO | NYC (@lauren_bongiorno) on

TIP 3: PRIORITIZE YOUR HEALTH AND WELLBEING!

TIP 4: BE PRESENT IN THE MOMENT, YOUR BODY, AND LIFE

View this post on Instagram

part 1/3. New Year Intentions. I should have had multiple burn outs. I’m actually shocked at how all over the place I was last year. I know the only reason I was able to keep moving forward was because I prioritized my health( sleep, food, blood sugars). I heard once that busy isn’t a badge of honor. Couldn’t agree more. December was actually my best, most enjoyable month of the year. I told my best friend Alex it was my month of “yin”, which meant only dedicating time to the things that were absolutely essential, not overextending myself. Towards the end of the month I was so sad it was ending because I felt SO good. But then i realized oh wait i can do this all the time hahah. So that’s what i’m doing. My word of 2019: ESSENTIALISM. My guiding statement: “stay in relationship with what matters.”. Sign: 333 (the number I frequently see which I will use to remind me to trust that i’m on the right path). 2019, we in it. What did you guys set as your intentions? More excited for the next 12 months than I’ve ever been before. Can’t wait to throw these up on a vision board. #yearoftheessentialist

A post shared by LAUREN BONGIORNO | NYC (@lauren_bongiorno) on

TIP 5: STICK TO A DAILY ROUTINE

View this post on Instagram

part 2/3: My 6 new years daily habits💫 Its cool to set intentions in whatever way you’ll feel most successful! For me i’m a lover of checking boxes off + getting real specific. So last week i took some time to map out my 2019 daily habits: 1. Movement: yoga, hiit circuits, weights, pilates, walking. My WHY: blood sugars are best, mood is happy, love a challenge. 2. Tackle the big rocks before 12pm: the things on my to do list that are the most difficult. MY WHY: i have most energy and focus in morning hours. Want to sync up more with sunrise and sunset energy. 3. Be present through listen + feel. MY WHY: i sometimes find myself guessing where convo is going or rushing it to be doing something else. I want to feel a greater sense of connection and appreciation, treating every convo as sacred. 4. Lateral thinking exercise: solve a brain teaser or write down 10 ideas. MY WHY: get outside my box and limitations of habitual thinking patterns. See what blossoms. 5. Study outside my industry of health: book, podcast, documentary, the Economist, become more proficient in SPANISH! MY WHY: expand my knowledge into different areas. 6. Align + Manifest- journaling, card pull, visualization, or meditation. MY WHY: we attract the level at which we vibrate at. Excited for all these! My daily routines were getting a bit stale. What things are you looking to make into habits this year? #newyear #growthmindset

A post shared by LAUREN BONGIORNO | NYC (@lauren_bongiorno) on

 

Working Out With No Obstacles

Hello friends! My name is Judy and I’ve been a T1 diabetic for 18 years now! You may know me from my Instagram account @hyper.hypo and blog/shop (www.diahyperhypo.com), and you may already know how much I love to help other T1s with my experiences and tips. I believe that diabetes should never be a limitation, and with a positive attitude and positive thoughts, it is easier to live with this disease that often feels like riding a rollercoaster.

I know that having T1 can often lead to a lot of questions:  ‘’Should I inject for this’’, ‘’Should I eat now?’, ‘’Should I tell people I’m low and not actually drunk?’’ However, in my opinion, one of the main subjects that us T1s tend to ask questions about is type one diabetes and exercise. A lot of diabuddies think that they need to workout less or not at all because of their numbers, or even limit themselves to a type of exercise but I am telling you with full confidence: THAT IS NOT TRUE!

I believe so much in the affirmation: ‘’Diabetes is not a limitation’’ that I decided to launch my own line of diabetes sportswear.

I decided to create something that will empower a lot of type ones when exercising: a sports bra with an integrated pocket to put the insulin pump (or PDM or supplies or phone, you decide!). I know that working out while having T1 diabetes brings extra responsibilities, so having a pocket that will let you have an intensive and satisfying workout will motivate you to get off your couch and move!

In my case, every time I work out, I feel good. You may think: ‘’Okay Judy that is so cliché!’’ It is, I have to admit it, but it’s the truth! Here are my 3 main tips that help me exercise with type one diabetes:

  1. It’s okay to change your schedule

Be mindful. Accept the fact that you didn’t stick to your workout plan. Accept the fact that you exercised during the evening and not in the morning like you planned to because of your numbers. Once you accept that your schedule might me modified, you will be happier while working out. Things happen!

2. Try to workout with no insulin on board

Working out in the morning works best because there is no insulin in the body (well usually). Sometimes, the blood sugar might spike, so it is important to know your body and to know that a correction might be needed. If there is insulin on board (meaning you injected yourself not so long before), you might need to set a temporary basal rate (if you’re on the pump) or try to inject less insulin before a meal/snack before a workout for next time.

3. Yes, what you eat is important!

Food. Everybody loves food, right? The thing with food is that it can give you instant satisfaction, but might get you lazy if you don’t eat something good for you. Eating a lot of vegetables, fruits and fibers will get you motivated and won’t make you say:

“Ugh yeah I’ll go to the gym tomorrow.” Eating proteins and carbs coming from non-fatty foods will make you feel good, help with your digestion, and affect your numbers before/ after a workout in a beautiful way!

And always remember: Train 30mn a day to avoid being tired 24h a day!

– Judy

Real Talk With Dave: Appreciate the Ordinary Days

When living with Diabetes, there really aren’t any “ordinary” days. Every day, regardless of what goes on, has some type of situation. You could have perfect blood sugars all day, but you may have to change out your pump site. You could have a day where you are still within your weeklong range of wearing your Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) and don’t have to put in a new site, but be struggling with constant high blood sugars. My point is, no day goes by with T1D in which everything is just “perfect”. However, even though Diabetes doesn’t seem fair all the time, we can still experience several really good days.

When I sit down and think of what an ordinary Diabetes day looks like, I immediately think of how that consists of sticking to a relaxed daily routine. We all have them, but some days, those routines can change quite drastically and you may have to skip out on some tasks you always do. However, an ordinary day with T1D can simply be waking up every day feeling the same and knowing how your blood sugars typically will be in the morning, given that some mornings may be so off to the point where you really don’t know what went wrong, I mean after all, this is Diabetes we’re talking about, things happen, unexpectedly.

Another “ordinary” Diabetes day consists of having a stress-free day (weekends, holidays, etc.), pretty much any day that you have off from work and school, in all honesty. I have to admit, I almost enjoy having to go to school and work as it puts my Diabetes on a schedule (meals, snacks, basal rates, etc.), but I do appreciate a day off where I don’t have to constantly think of the fear of going low or high when I’m away from home.

For some reason, home is always a safe place in my mind in terms of Diabetes. When I go low or high, I would much rather experience it at home, just as a form of comfort and safety, some may disagree, but we all have our own individual preferences, and that’s okay! Any possible way to avoid stress on your mind and body will also help and benefit you and your Diabetes as stress plays a huge role on blood sugar management. Another way to feel like your Diabetes is going just great is when you have what you need and normally have with you on hand, such as your favorite low treatment solution or adhesive for your sites, allowing you to move forward with your Diabetes and own it, just the way you are used to. If some things are off and you don’t have the necessities you need, you can create a problem, which can put you in a difficult place with your Diabetes and could even cause an emergency.

To sum up, I appreciate a day where I am familiar with my Diabetes and its very unique patterns.  I like having days in which I am used to and know what is going on with my health. I can trust my Diabetes and feel confident in almost knowing what to expect and when to expect it. I think that goes for every Type 1 Diabetic. We like having days in which we have little to no worry in managing our Diabetes as we feel as though we’ve got it all under control. This doesn’t mean every now and then we have perfect days, no day is perfect, Diabetic or not. I stress the fact of appreciating ordinary days and we don’t get them always, but when we do, it’s a victory to celebrate. Non-Diabetics should understand this, as we go through so much with our Diabetes daily, that some days are just horrible. Highs, lows, fears, you name it! When we do have a successful day with our T1D, we’re going to show it!

Don’t stress, the more days in which you are comfortable with and the days that allow you to appreciate life and the blessings of Diabetes, the better!

 

Live well,

 

David

Real Talk With Dave: What’s In My Diabetes Bag?

When you are first diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, sitting there in the hospital, you don’t really know what to expect and don’t know how T1D is going to change your life. You are given your very first blood glucometer and have no idea what it is, what it may be used for, and how you are going to have to carry it around with you wherever you go. You are given a plain, boring, and lifeless case to carry the major components to checking your blood sugar in: meter, lancing device, test strips, a few syringes, alcohol swabs, and some lancets, all in a tiny little carrying case. Where’s the fun in that?

Over the years of living with T1D, I’ve come to realize how if you want to thrive with your Diabetes, you must fully take control and turn it into your own. You have to OWN your disease. I’ve noticed several amazing Diabetic brands form such incredible Diabetic bags and meter cases, designed to fit our style and relate to our own individual needs for a person living with T1D on the go. I will be listing some of my favorite Diabetic branded meter cases and bags and hopefully it will inspire you to go out and purchase your own, allowing you to fully accept your Diabetes and love the amazing life you live!

 

Myabetic / The Myabetic meter cases are so amazing and allow you to show off your style however you want (and most people won’t even know you are carrying Diabetic supplies!). These meter cases and Diabetic bags come in a variety of colors, designs, and styles. They have a variety of Diabetic backpacks, cases, and purses, all with different compartments for specific T1D supplies!

Shop Casualty Girl / These meter cases are so fun for a person who fully understands the true struggles with T1D as they are these nicely sized bags, simple and clean, but have a funny phrase or saying on the bag, such as, “But First, Insulin” or “Test Strip Graveyard”. Any Diabetic can relate to all the fun sayings on the bag, opening up interesting discussions at the dinner table!

 

Genteel / The Genteel lancing device is a great way to give your fingers a break from pricking day and night as it is an all new device that allows you to prick other parts on your body, such as your palm or leg, and allows you to get a blood drop without any pain due to their vacuuming technology! When you receive your Genteel lancing device, you automatically get a meter case with their logo on it, big enough to carry the device and more.

These are just some of the many brands that have helped us Type 1 Diabetics get creative and have something more inspiring and stylish to carry all our Diabetes supplies in daily. It can be hard to have to carry everything around all the time, from backup pump supplies, to a whole supply of low treatment options, but with the help of these carefully thought out bags and kits, we can now LIVE in style and be the amazing Diabetics we all are!

 

Live well,

 

Dave

Real Talk With Dave: You Are NOT Alone

“You are not alone”. Just one thing they immediately tell you when you are diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Though this is so true, when one is first diagnosed, that is not necessarily something you would want to hear. It takes time and a personal connection with T1D on a unique level to fully understand this phrase.

When I was first diagnosed at the age of 11, I was still unclear as to what my life was turning out to be. I was frustrated, scared, and confused most of all. Out of politeness and respect, everyone would tell me, “you are not alone” and how millions of others fight the same fight daily and struggle to make ends meet with their Diabetes. However, I simply did not like that saying at the time. I hadn’t fully accepted or made peace with the fact that I had this disease to deal with now for the rest of my life or until there is a cure, causing me to feel as though nobody understood what I was going through and how no one could ever relate with me. Fast forward to today, I now know that is not the case AT ALL.

Take it from an actual Type 1 Diabetic, if someone ever says the phrase “you are not alone”, believe it, because that is actual truth right there. Over the past few months, I have been given the amazing privilege of actually meeting such awesome Type 1 Diabetics in person and just the few times I’ve spent with them, I’ve realized how we really are not alone. We all go low. We all go high. We all know what it feels like to be so sick of dealing with T1D every day and it being such a big deal in our lives. We know what it feels like to wear a device on our bodies 24/7 in order to stay alive. We know what needles feel like. And we simply know what pain feels like.

The few meet-ups I’ve been to where the majority were Type 1 Diabetics, there were countless times in which I actually saw one another with the full T1D package. Pump sites, medical devices, low/high treatment solutions, you name it! We all go through it and know EXACTLY what it is like.

I can remember being surrounded by other Diabetics and going low and having others around me offer to help and ask if I was feeling okay, simply because they knew what it feels like. Something about being so real with each other and experiencing similar situations can really build up trust and loyalty with one another, creating lasting and memorable friendships. Of all the wonderful T1D’s out there, whether on Instagram, YouTube, or just about anywhere else where we can share via social media our daily struggles, I constantly see others showing what they are dealing with and seeking support from each other, which is why the Diabetic community never ceases to amaze me at how kind everyone truly is. Seeing how others are doing at different parts of the day really keeps us all in the loop together and allows for discussion and a place to vent off on our T1D. None of us know what may happen with our Diabetes at any given point in our lives, which is why, when something does happen, we can always depend on one another for the right words and support we crave.

If you are in a bad place with your Diabetes and are feeling all alone, fret no more! Surround yourself with other Diabetics and don’t be afraid to completely vent off on your feelings towards T1D, chances are, everyone else will feel the exact same way. It always helps to have someone to turn to in any situation regarding your Diabetes for a sense of understanding and care. I can guarantee you will feel so much better about your Diabetes and will be so inspired to spread awareness in ending T1D. There are thousands of other Diabetics out there, in person and online, and several Diabetic organizations that are constantly up with ways to bring us closer together, allowing us to never feel alone.

Just remember, life is a beautiful gift and though Diabetes is a factor in our lives that we never wish we had, it makes it so much easier having each other to remind us that we can do anything as long as we stick together.

 

WE ARE NOT ALONE. Don’t forget that.

 

Live well,

 

Dave

Real Talk with Dave: How To do Disneyland as a Diabetic

   We all know Disneyland is The Happiest Place on Earth, however, going to the park as a Type 1 Diabetic can be somewhat of a challenge and not always the happiest it could be. This past week, I had the privilege of spending my 21st birthday at Disneyland and I came across some minor challenges and things I had to figure out throughout the day, but through it all, I learned some valuable bits of knowledge to carry around with me whenever I am out on the go for a long period of time away from home. I have put together some helpful tips and tricks in making your trip to Disneyland, or any other long day trip by that token, a fun and enjoyable experience.

DO:

1/ Plan your day: When going to Disneyland, you may not want to worry about T1D getting in the way of your fun, however, it is very important, especially as a Diabetic, to plan out your day, what time you will arrive, leave, eat your meals, etc., so that you can arrange accordingly your day and ensure the most fun and less stress during your Disney day! When you know approximately what time things will take place, you can plan how many snacks you should bring to regulate your blood sugars throughout the day as you walk around the park, you can know what you will be doing and when, making sure you have all the right supplies in case of an emergency, and so on.

2/ Bring enough (and more) supplies: When going literally ANYWHERE as a Diabetic, it is always smart to have all the necessary supplies that will be of great help, whether in an emergency or not. Always planning ahead and preparing for the worst is key in making sure you have the best outing possible. When I go to Disneyland, I have a backpack with me at ALL times and in that backpack, I carry different pouches and cases full of backup pump sites, syringes (incase my pump were to somehow break), batteries, alcohol swabs, juice and glucose tabs, water, and so much more because nobody ever knows what may happen as the day goes by and it is better to have all the supplies readily available with you than having to leave the park and go home simply because your site went bad, perhaps. I typically advise that you bring a second backup of everything, just in case your first backup tends to fail somehow. Yes, your bag may be heavier than you would like at this point, but it is better to be safe than sorry!

3/ Stand your ground: As a Diabetic, one of the most frustrating things can be dealing with uneducated people (such as security or anybody else in the public eye) and having to explain what your Insulin pump or medications are for can be somewhat of a challenge (sometimes). When going through security, depending on the guard at the time, be prepared to explain your Diabetes to them and don’t let them force you in through the metal detector, resulting in your pump to breakdown from radiation. Simply explain the dangers of going through with a pump and most of the time, they are very understanding and kind, they just may have to pat you down or use a wand, which isn’t all that bad, again, better safe than sorry. Your right as a Diabetic allows you to carry all your supplies, food, and drinks with you at all times, as you are dealing with a chronic disease that shouldn’t be cared for lightly.

DON’T:

1/ Forget to stop and check: When at Disneyland, you’ll probably be so caught up in all the fun, that the last thing you will want to do is worry about your T1D. However, it is important that every now and then, you stop and take a rest to check your blood sugars and treat accordingly. You will have a much better time knowing that your numbers are just fine if you simply take mini breaks throughout the day to care for yourself!

2/ Show up to the park with an almost empty pump reservoir: It happens, but sometimes, we need to take a step back and think before we act. When going on a fun-filled day, we MUST always make sure we have a decent amount of Insulin in our pumps (or carry an extra vile of insulin) as you never know what emergencies you may run into. Also, when at Disneyland, you may run into foods and treats that you want to allow yourself to have and most of those foods may be high in carbs/sugar, requiring larger amounts of Insulin. When I know I will be out of the house for a full day, I always either change my pump site the night before, allowing for a full reservoir of Insulin or I just make sure I have a fresh new vile of Insulin that I carry around with me throughout the day incase my pump goes empty, in which depending on the weather, you will need to make sure your Insulin stays cool and out of direct sunlight or severe cold temperatures.

3/ Have only a few sources of sugar on hand: One of the scariest parts about T1D is going low and we all know the panic that comes with low blood sugars. Always make sure you have some form of sugar on hand throughout the day (depending on how long you will be away from home) and if you somehow run out of sugar as the day goes by, RESTOCK! Stop what you are doing and go buy some juice or candy right away, because you don’t know when your next low may hit and if you are not prepared and find yourself standing in a long line to pay for some sugar when you are low, it won’t be a fun time and that will add to your panic. Like mentioned above, ALWAYS be prepared!

To sum up, going to Disneyland is supposed to be a fun time for you, so to take out the stress and ensure that you will have a great day, try and follow these tips during your next adventure!  

Live well,

 

Dave

Inside the Patient Entrepreneur’s Mind with Sigurjón Lýðsson

Sigurjon Lydsson

Having a chronic-illness can be challenging, and running your own business can be hard. No matter where you fit on the spectrum, we could all use a little motivation.  Our #InsidethePatientEntrepreneursMind blog series gives you insight and life hacks on how to stay motivated from some of the most innovative patient entrepreneurs in the world.

Sigurjón Lýðsson is the CEO and Co-Founder of Medilync, a medical platform which builds cloud-based medical solutions where big data, IoT, and engagement are key to alleviating the burden of diabetes.

Sigurjón sat down with Lyfebulb to tell us how his father’s medical diagnosis with T1D, cancer and his short term memory lost motivated him to look for a solution that would help his family and medical provider manage the care of his father.

What motivated you to create a business addressing a disease you know so well?
My father has had Type I diabetes for apporx 40 years now. When growing up we usually didn’t notice that he had T1D, he never complained about it. Captain on a shipping vessel with 8-10 souls he was told he couldn’t do it. He never gave in. In later years he started to show symptoms of memory loss. We, his sons, would joke about that and so did he. But when he was diagnosed with cancer and it had spread to his brain, we got ever so more worried. At that time he had forgot if he’d measured his glucose or even if he injected or not. So when we were told his tumor would affect his memory I started looking for a solution for my dad. I could not find it! I still can’t as I am still trying to get it funded. I know I have the solution, but I fear it will be too late for my dad. If I can help anyone else live a better, safer life then I will be happy.

What are some of the hurdles you perceive exist for people with your disease?
Diabetes is one of the toughest disease out there. But information flow in general is what is the biggest hurdle today. Information from patients to clinicians is too cumbersome and usually only verbal from the patient to clinicians. We have a solution that has changed that.

Who are some of your role models in your space?
Not necessary in my field but Juan Mata Garcia is my latest role model. Kind person to those who need it, gives 1% of his Manchester United income to others. Bill Gates is another one I admire. Using his wealth to find a cure for polio for example, is just amazing.

What is your goal beyond creating a successful business?
Help people live better and safer lives.

What does Lyfebulb mean to you? How can we support you better? What are some of the biggest gaps today for a “young” entrepreneur?
Funding a company doing a hardware for diabetes is really difficult so anything in that area would definitely help.

How do you stay healthy and motivated to deliver?
As I am 75% likely, due to genes, to get Type II diabetes I do take care of my nutrition and I do cross-fit 5 times a week. That gives me the energy I need to get ahead of the curb.

How has mentorship made a difference in your professional and personal life?
Mentorships are key to new companies to a difficult market.

How can we draw more attention to user-driven innovation?
Solely by involving the users more.

How do you maintain work/life balance?
I would always be lying if I’d say that I can control it, but I do my best.

If you had three wishes, what would they be?
I could create a legacy which saves lives 2) My family be safe from harm 3) Peace on earth ☺.

What is your favorite song that gets you motivated?
My own song Unity 😉


#InsidethePatientEntrepreneursMind is a weekly blog series that highlights members of Lyfebulb’s Patient-Entrepreneur Circle. The Entrepreneur Circle is an educational and inspirational platform for all people living with, or affected by chronic disease. Existing entrepreneurs will be available to educate new dreamers through the website and through live events. To read more or to apply to join the Enrepreneur Circle click here.

Interests - Select all that apply