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All Roads Lead To Wellness: How Our Different Backgrounds Led Us To Lyfebulb

Katie:

In May of 2019, I joined Lyfebulb as the new Community Manager. Like many patients (including Ambassadors and Entrepreneurs) part of the Lyfebulb community, my health journey has not been easy. I struggled with chronic, neurological Lyme disease for close to a decade. The lack of awareness of this chronic illness prolonged my receiving of adequate treatment because of the inability to get properly diagnosed. Once diagnosed, I spent years researching all that I could about chronic Lyme and making all possible lifestyle changes within my control (diet, exercise, sleep hygiene, chemical-free product substitutions) to get myself out of a state of illness and into one closer resembling “wellness”.

After I could finally see the light at the end of the tunnel and observed marked changes in my symptoms, I learned how important support drawn from shared chronic illness experiences are to improved disease management and in certain cases, remission. Through this realization, I went to culinary school to learn the intricacies of preparing healthy yet still delicious food so that I could more thoroughly stay true to my commitment to wellness. My chronic illness ultimately taught me how to thrive in life, directing me towards likeminded people who have had similar health journeys.

At the age of 27, I now work for Lyfebulb in order to help build the chronic disease community that I wish I had from the start of my health journey–especially during my sickest years. Chronic illness strips you of hope and the natural instinct of a chronically-ill person is to curl up and isolate from the rest of the world. My goal is to encourage others who are either creating community or innovation around their disease to come together so that we can make the impact of patient-driven innovation and messages of how to thrive with chronic illness, or of wellness, that much stronger.

Jamie:

I joined Lyfebulb in June of 2019. My role includes the development of partnerships, execution of Innovation Summits, and the management of Lyfebulb’s Patient Entrepreneur Circle. I came to Lyfebulb with a different background than most of my colleagues. Unlike Katie, Karin, and our extended community, I do not suffer from chronic disease, nor do I have loved-ones who do – or so I thought prior to joining Lyfebulb.

Though fortunate on to this end, health and wellness has always been a high priority. With northern California roots, it was instilled upon me at a very young age that it is more than just a lifestyle choice – it is necessary to keep the body and brain sustainable.

Formally, I geared my educational studies towards art history and business. After school, I landed a dream job in the field at an art market transparency company. Four years later, I found myself feeling unfulfilled. Though art will always be a passion, I sought out to find a field where I could make more of an impact.

I found Lyfebulb by chance, attending the UnitedHealth Group Summit activation event for depression and anxiety. Shortly thereafter, I joined the Lyfebulb team and brought the UHG Summit to fruition. Though grateful for my time spent in art, I am grateful to have returned to my path of wellness and health, and look forward to where it will take me.

Poached Pears With Whipped Cream Recipe

POACHED PEARS WITH WHIPPED CREAM

poached pear

An original recipe  from Lyfebulb CEO Dr. Karin Hehenberger, MD, PhD

Interested in more delicious auto-immune diet friendly recipes! Click the link  to learn more about “The Everything You Need to Know About Diabetes Cookbook: Expert advice, plus 70 recipes complete with nutritional breakdowns.”
Pears are delicious, particularly in the fall and winter, and can easily be found in most food markets. This dessert is healthy and looks so yummy.

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups (350 ml) red wine
Juice of 1 lemon
1/2 teaspoon stevia
1/2 vanilla bean(pod) split in half lengthwise and seeds scraped out or 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cinnamon stick
5 cloves
1 orange, quartered
4 small ripe pears, peeled
Scant 1/2 cup (100ml)
whipping cream,
whipped, to serve
Serves 4

Instructions

1. In a saucepan large enough to hold the pears snugly, pour in the wine and lemon juice, then add the stevia, vanilla seeds or extract, cinnamon, and cloves, Squeeze the juice from the orange quarts into the saucepan, then add one of the squeezed orange quarters to the saucepan and discard the remainder. Finally, add the pears.
2. Set the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 25 minutes, turning the pears occasionally, until they’re easily pierced with the tip of a knife. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pears to individual plates.
3. Pour the poaching liquid through a strainer set over a bowl and discard the orange quarter and spices.  Return the poaching liquid to the saucepan, bring to a simmer, and cook for about 15 minutes, or until the poaching liquid is syrupy and reduced by two-thirds.  Let cool a little( you don’t want the syrup to melt the whipped cream).
4. Spoon the syrup over the pears and serve with the whipped cream.
Per serving: 239 kcals, 10.3 g fat (6.3 g saturates), 16.9 g carbohydrate (16.7 sugars), 1.3 G protein, 3.6 g fiber, trace salt

Enjoy!

Portobello Mushrooms Stuffed With Cauliflower Couscous

This vegetarian dish is perfect for lunch ?

Ingredients:

  • 2 Portobello mushrooms
  • Half cauliflower
  • Bunch of fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon milled golden flax seed
  • 1 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon sweet red pepper
  • 1 cup cashew nuts
  • Half a cup dried cranberry
  • Half a cup raisins
  • Salt for taste

Directions:

  1. Heat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius (400 degrees Fahrenheit). Wash and cut the cauliflower into smaller pieces. Put it into oven for 15 minutes (keep checking if it isn’t burning and flip it after every 5 minutes). Don’t turn off the oven – you will need it for later.
  2. Meanwhile chop the whole parsley and cashew nuts.
  3. Take the roasted cauliflower out of the oven and let it cool down.
  4. Grate the cauliflower into the bowl. Add parsley, oil, cardamon, sweet red pepper, cashew nuts, dried cranberry and raisins. Add salt for taste. Mix everything finely.
  5. Wash mushrooms, cut the mushroom legs off, smear mushroom hats with oil and add a little salt on both sides.
  6. Put the couscous into the mushroom hats and sprinkle with flax seed on the top. Put it into heat resistant dish (without cover).
  7. Bake it for around 15 minutes.

Enjoy your meal!


Follow Weronika on her blog, Blue Sugar Cube!

The Perfect Paleo Waffle

When Saturday and Sunday roll around, I love waking up and making waffles; they are my favorite weekend treat. Having little bite-sized pieces makes my sense of creativity feel endless- from dipping it in dark chocolate to adding a variety of fruit to my new favorite or sprinkling any type of nut spread. My current obsession is any nut butter from Wild Friends. If you have not heard of Wild Friends, I suggest checking them out my favorites are Chocolate Almond Butter, Cinnamon Raisin Peanut Butter, and Chocolate Coconut Peanut Butter.

These are the only flavors I have tried and I LOVE them all so much, I simply cannot choose between them. If you have not had Wild Friends, I suggest trying them and letting us know which flavor is YOUR favorite. If you have, can you give us suggestions as to which flavor we should try next?!

Ingredients:

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3 egg whites
  • ¼ cup coconut or nut milk
  • 1 cup gluten free flour (substitutes; almond or brown rice)
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • Pinch of salt for taste

Toppings:

  • Wild Friends Chocolate Almond Butter
  • Strawberries
  • Blueberries

Directions:

  • Preheat the waffle iron
  • In a medium bowl, whisk the egg yolks and milk or choice
  • Add in flour and pinch of salt. Combine until smooth, once smooth add in the coconut oil
  • Whisk egg whites for roughly one minute
  • Combine egg whites and batter until smooth
  • Add maple syrup, mix well
  • Scoop desired amount onto a preheated and greased waffle iron
  • Cook until golden

Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 10 – 15 mins
Total Time: 20 – 25 mins
Serving Size: 4
Calories: 320

10 Health Benefits of Apples – Proven by Science (+ 5 Delicious Apple Recipes)

Apples are popular not just because of their simple, delicate flavors. While apples are delicious, and can span from very sweet to incredibly tart, they are also incredibly healthy.

Apples are loaded with healthy phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Phytonutrients are plant-based compounds that can only be obtained through eating fruits and vegetables. They’re typically very good for your immune system. Vitamins and minerals give structure to our bodies and the systems operating within. Antioxidants help our body function more efficiently and prevent oxidative damage, which is what makes us age.

apples-490474_640

Apples have been hailed for helping heal the body for centuries, but scientific method has only recently been able to extensively study the fruit. Many of the most important claims made about apples turned out to be true.

Apples can help with anything from repairing damaged tissues that can impair strength or vision, to maintaining a proper electrical current to the brain so it can communicate effectively.

Apples can help with anything from repairing damaged tissues that can impair strength or vision, to maintaining a proper electrical current to the brain so it can communicate effectively.

A particular nutrient of interest in apples is vitamin C. Scurvy – a deficiency of vitamin C – is a disease that often conjures images of swashbuckling pirates with missing teeth, bad gums, and scabbed arms. These are all symptoms of vitamin C deficiency, which often happened to seamen on long voyages when deprived of fresh food.

Why is vitamin C so important?

What’s the good thing about knowing the symptoms of scurvy? Almost everything vitamin C deficiency causes, can be reversed and, in healthy people, made even healthier – simply by eating a good supply of the vitamin Vitamin C. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and is responsible for a lot of the health benefits you’ll find in apples – stronger grums, healthier skin, and strong teeth just to name a few!

Considering apples are incredibly well-known for being healthy, it’s surprising how few nutrients they have in them. A lot of their nutritional value is from the single, potent vitamin/antioxidant that is vitamin C. Unfortunately, a huge number of people in modern society are deficient in vitamin C. 15 percent of the population in the United States is classified as deficient in vitamin C!

Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C is one of the most well-known and commonly studied vitamins on the planet. It is responsible for a vast number of health-bolstering effects, and can even function on its own as an antioxidant.

Antioxidants prevent the symptoms of aging by fighting oxidative damage, which occurs during natural periods of stress. Oxidative damage gradually reduces the function of organs, tissues, and cells, causing the slow degradation of the human body.

Preventing this oxidation is the key activity – and appeal – of antioxidants. They fight the underlying cause of pretty much every type of natural aging, and can greatly extend the human lifespan. Vitamin C, in particular, is good at

  • Bolstering the strength and improving the appearance of your hair
  • Increasing the health of your teeth and gums
  • Strengthening your skin, making it appear young and healthy
  • Increasing the speed with which your body heals injuries

While apples have an impressive amount of vitamin C – around ten percent of our daily value per apple – and fiber – almost 4 grams of insoluble fiber, and half a gram of soluble – they’re also impressively low in other nutrients. They only have trace amounts of the B complex, biotin, vitamin E, chromium, copper, and potassium. The amount of these nutrients present isn’t enough to bother supplementing apples to fix a deficiency.

Antioxidants in apples and their effects on human health

It’s not just vitamin C that helps your body ward off the unpleasant symptoms of scurvy. You may wonder how else apples can help you, if their main nutrient is only vitamin C?

Despite having a very small profile of nutrients and minerals apples have a ton of components that bolster our abilities as humans. These aren’t vitamins and minerals, though – most of them are antioxidants.

  • Polyphenols

Polyphenols are divided into two subtypes – flavonoids and non-flavonoids. Many of the polyphenols in apples are found in the skin – so make sure you don’t peel them before eating them, or you’ll be peeling off a lot of the health benefits!

Apples are responsible for about a fifth of the total polyphenols consumed in the United States. Among apple’s polyphenols are

  • Quercetin glycoside, responsible for fighting atherosclerosis and maintaining healthy blood pressure and blood sugar.
  • Phloretin glycoside, another flavonoid commonly found in all varieties of apples, helps the body’s immune system function and helps excrete waste effectively and efficiently.
  • Chlorogenic acid speeds up your body’s metabolism while simultaneously slowing the absorption of fat, making it an ideal antioxidant for people hoping to lose weight.
  • Epicatechin is an antioxidant capable of mimicking insulin and can consequently improve heart health and help fight against diabetes.

Different varieties of apples will have different antioxidant capacities. Of these different varieties, even individual batches will have different amounts. It’s possible to pick-and-choose different types of apples for the specific types of antioxidants that you require for your own personal choice of diet.

The variance of antioxidants will not differ too drastically, so you can be sure that the health benefits listed below will apply to most – if not all – apples.

Here are the 10 health benefits of apples, as backed by science.

  1. Apples can help you lose weight
  2. Apples can reduce LDL cholesterol
  3. Apples can improve mental health and intelligence
  4. Apples can prevent heart disease
  5. Apples can help you breathe better
  6. Apples can fight different types of cancer
  7. Apples can prevent diabetes
  8. Apples help bolster the body’s immune system
  9. Apples are potent anti-inflammatory agents
  10. Apples can fight allergies

To read more in-depth about each of the listed benefits above, and to learn some delicious apple recipes, click here.


Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, and use the hashtag #CookingThroughLyfe to show us your healthy recipes!

Almond Joy Date Bites

I consider medjool dates my best friend. Not only do they taste like candy, they satisfy my craving for chocolate. They are packed with bone strengthening-minerals, filled with triglyceride-lowering antioxidants. This recipe is key to helping curve my candy cravings.

almondjoydates1

What you’ll need:

  • 1 cup Dates
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened Coconut
  • 1 cup Almonds
  • 2 tablespoons Cacao powder
  • 1/2 tsp Vanilla extract
  • Pinch of sea salt

almondjoydates2

Prep Time: 10 mins
Total Time: 10 mins
Serving: 5 (3 bites per serving)
Average Calories per Serving: 250 calories

Directions:

  1. Add the dates to the food processor and process until they have broken up and formed a ball if the consistency seems dry add ½ tbsp. at a time until desired consistency.
  2. Add the almonds, cocoa powder, vanilla extract, unsweetened coconut, and sea salt.
  3. Process until all parts are evenly blended and the mixture forms into a ball again.
  4. Remove mixture from the food processor and roll into roughly 15 bites
  5. If desired, roll each ball in the shredded coconut.
  6. Keep refrigerated

Seared Scottish Salmon + NYC Restaurant Week!

We are halfway into NYC Restaurant Week Winter 2017! We hope all of the New York locals have been enjoying the participating restaurants and #EatingWell. If you didn’t already know, one of our Lyfebulb Favorites is Brasserie Ruhlmann located in Rockefeller Center. Chef Laurent Tourondel is incredible, the food is exquisite, and the atmosphere is cozy and chic.

Until February 10th, Brasserie Ruhlmann will be offering a delicious, three-course prix-fixe menu in honor of Restaurant Week. At $42, this deal cannot be beat, and you won’t want to miss it!

They have kindly shared the recipe for their delicious seared Scottish salmon with wheat berry salad so that we could share it with you! Enjoy!

 Seared Scottish Salmon With Wheat Berry Salad

salmon

Salad Ingredients:

1cup Wheat berry
1cup Quinoa
1pc Avocado (diced)
1cup Butternut squash diced-.4 ounces small diced and blanched
½ cup Dried cranberries
¼ cup Candied orange
1 cup Kale
Champagne vinaigrette-4 tablespoons
1Tbs Chives
1Tbs Parsley

Wheat Berry Instructions:

Wheat berry’s- soaks them overnight to soften up. Place them in a small saucepot submerged in water with 3 springs of thyme. Cook on a medium-low heat until tender without making them burst. Let cool in water for 10 minutes after cook time. Strain and use.

Champagne vinaigrette- yields ¾ cups

Dijon mustard- 2 tablespoons
Champagne vinegar= ¼ cup
Lemon juice-2 tablespoons
Honey- 1 tablespoon
EVO- ½ cup
Thyme-1 tablespoon
Salt
Pepper

Vinaigrette Instructions:

  1. In a medium mixing bowl place mustard, vinegar, salt, pepper, thyme, honey and whisk together.
  2. Slowly whisk in the olive oil until the dressing is emulsified.

Candy Orange

Small dice 2 whole oranges and blanch 5 times in cold to hot water. On the final blanch with cold water add one cup of sugar and reduce until orange is sweet.

Add a piece of seared Scottish salmon and enjoy!


Make sure to follow us on Instagram (@Lyfebulb) and tag us in your delicious and healthy photos of restaurant week!

Rainy Day Lentil And Vegetable Soup

It’s rainy and cold today, which calls for a warm pot of soup and a glowing fire in the fireplace. I love lentil soup, but most canned lentil and vegetable soups contain potatoes which only adds to the carbohydrate count without adding much nutrition. For that reason, I like to make my own. This particular recipe is more like a stew because it is thick with delicious vegetables! I used the prepackaged cooked lentils that can sometimes be found in the produce section of the supermarket or at Trader Joe’s. Their convenience and excellent taste can’t be beat! Feel free to add your favorite vegetables or substitute another dark, leafy green (in place of the kale), if you desire. Then curl up with a good book and a steaming cup of soup — it will warm your heart!

soup

Rainy Day Lentil & Vegetable Soup
(Makes about ten 1¼-cup servings)

2 teaspoons olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
2 cups celery, sliced
3 carrots, sliced into half rounds
1 cup green beans, sliced
1 medium zucchini, sliced into quarter rounds
6-8 stalks asparagus, cut into 1″ pieces
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 teaspoons dried parsley
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 (14.5 oz.) can diced tomatoes
8 cups reduced sodium chicken or vegetable broth
2½ cups cooked lentils
4 cups kale, chopped
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Heat olive oil in a large dutch oven or stew pot. Add onion, carrot, celery, green beans, zucchini, asparagus, garlic and dried herbs. Cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft and translucent. Add tomatoes and broth and bring to a boil. Add lentils and kale and simmer for 30-40 minutes until vegetables are soft and kale has wilted. Adjust seasonings and serve.

Nutritional Information per serving: 111 calories, 20 g carbohydrate, 1 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 5.9 g fiber, 486 mg sodium, 8.5 g protein.

Original recipe by Kathy Sheehan, copyright 2010.

Recipe by Diabetics Rejoice! Read her amazing blog here, find her on Facebook here, and check out her website here!

Spirulina Bowl Recipe

I love using spirulina as an additional source of protein in my diet, not to mention it contains a multitude of benefits. According to draxe.com, just one 3-gram serving of spirulina contains:

  • 60% protein and an excellent source of vitamins A, K1, K2, B12 and iron, manganese and chromium.
  • A rich source of health-giving phytonutrients such as carotenoids, GLA, SOD and phycocyanin.
  • 2800% more beta-carotene than carrots.
  • 3900% more iron than spinach!

The best part about this meal is that I have the versatility of making it in a smoothie or a bowl based on my preference for the morning!

spirulina

Ingredients:
1 banana
1 tsp spirulina
1 tbsp hemp seeds
1/4 pineapple
6 oz of coconut or nut milk

Toppings:
1 tbsp. chia seeds
1 tbsp. hemp seeds
Handful of pineapple
Handful of Almonds

Directions:

  • Add the banana, pineapple, spirulina, unsweetened coconut or nut milk and hemp seeds, to a blender. Blend until smooth, adding extra milk as needed to create your preferred consistency.
  • Pour the spirulina mixture into a bowl and top with sliced fruit, chia and hemp seeds, or any toppings you prefer.
  • If you prefer to make a smoothie, pour the mixture into a to-go cup.

ENJOY!

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