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Inside the Patient Entrepreneur’s Mind: Jon Margalit

Jon Margalit

Managing a chronic illness is challenging, whether it is your own or a loved one’s. Starting and running a business also poses unique challenges. If you struggle with a chronic illness, have started a business, or want to start a business, this blog series can help guide you. “Inside the Patient Entrepreneur’s Mind” offers key insights into chronic disease and mission-driven entrepreneurship by some of the most innovative patient entrepreneurs in the world. 

Jon Margalit is CEO & Founder of Complete Start. 

As a patient entrepreneur, can you describe your personal experience with IBD from diagnosis through your current daily management and how this experience drove you to innovate the space?

To make a long story short, I am a very social and outgoing person who enjoyed immensely being out with friends networking, in all types of social settings. I was also an avid gym goer and black belt martial artist. Once diagnosed with Crohn’s, I had to deal with all kinds of drugs and steroids to mitigate the ill effects of the disease and as a result transformed into a guy with acne all over who was afraid to leave the house at the risk of being too far from a comfortable bathroom.

With that being said, after trying different types of drugs, I realized really quickly that this wouldn’t change until I took matters into my own hands to find solutions. After some research, the one thing I found I really had control over was what I was consuming. I focused on what I could control and immediately thought to myself if I study this, and become an expert in food science, perhaps I might be able to make some drastic changes in how I’m feeling and looking. Inflammation causes the digestive tract to shrink so we [the IBD community] have difficulty digesting whole vegetables and roughage. I had the idea to freeze dry and grind them into a powder to consume micronutrient rich vegetables without digestive issues. I bought a freeze drier on amazon to test the idea.

What makes Complete Start unique and how does it meet an unmet need of the IBD community?

There are products on the market that are similar in nature, but we are the only ones completely organic and non-GMO. Our goal is to deliver the most complete and clean digestible nutrition for customers. As a result, the cost to produce has vastly increased. I quickly realized why our competitors didn’t produce the same quality of product because it narrowed the customer base. We are sticking to offering a premium product at price, staying true to our goal. 

Are there any other unmet needs of the IBD community that you think take priority in working to address? How are patient entrepreneurs well-suited to meet these needs?

 I think that the key to making a widespread, massive impact is to create more awareness for the products, services, and support that are available, so I’d love to focus more on community building. When I was first dealing with Crohn’s, I was not aware of the products, services, and people out there that were available to help me overcome. Out of instinct and pain I sought them out and created resources for myself, which was key to remission. If I could go back in time where that community already existed, and someone introduced me, then things would’ve been easier to deal with and I would’ve found a way out much faster. My goal is to try and bring us together in a community form beyond just introducing patients to Complete Start.

Where do you draw your inspiration and motivation from to keep forging ahead as an entrepreneur in the healthcare industry?

The real answer is I was initially afraid to leave the house. I was afraid to be seen and covered in acne—steroids destroy you. Now, I want everyone to know that the fear they are feeling is not just them and someone like me can help alleviate those fears and show them the path. If I was able to breakthrough and overcome, they can too. It’s others in the community and the validation that I get from them when they reach out and say I read your story and it made me believe that perhaps I can get there too who inspire me. Other people continue to fuel my fire and my desire to keep getting out there to make sure that others are aware and can receive the comfort of a blueprint for healing. 

Lastly, what do you do for fun to manage the stress of running a business as both a person with IBD and an entrepreneur? Do you have any similar advice on work-life-disease management balance to others out there thinking of starting a business to meet an unmet need of a chronic disease patient community?

Absolutely. There is one key and I think that it is just as important as food—it’s exercise. I mean it very passionately—I am a daily hardcore gym goer and when I go to exercise, I go hard. When I do, I feel tremendously better. Movement and consistent exercise is the only way to complete the healing puzzle and again, that is another element that people have control over. Jon Margalit exercise fitnessI would recommend to anybody who is suffering out there first to test, then heed to Dr. Sandborne’s advice of eating what makes you feel good, and you’ve got to be consistent with exercise. Don’t just go through the motions—do it with purpose and passion. Push yourself physically because there is no bigger healing element in the world. The blood flow, endorphins and sense of accomplishment after a workout is the single most impactful driver to get me into remission. Two things people will never regret are eating vegetables and working out. The exercise is the stimulus to the right blood flow and right state of mind to tackle disease and career—both mental and physical battles. There is no better way to deal with the pain and discomfort of IBD than exercise.

All Roads Lead To Wellness: How Our Different Backgrounds Led Us To Lyfebulb

Katie:

In May of 2019, I joined Lyfebulb as the new Community Manager. Like many patients (including Ambassadors and Entrepreneurs) part of the Lyfebulb community, my health journey has not been easy. I struggled with chronic, neurological Lyme disease for close to a decade. The lack of awareness of this chronic illness prolonged my receiving of adequate treatment because of the inability to get properly diagnosed. Once diagnosed, I spent years researching all that I could about chronic Lyme and making all possible lifestyle changes within my control (diet, exercise, sleep hygiene, chemical-free product substitutions) to get myself out of a state of illness and into one closer resembling “wellness”.

After I could finally see the light at the end of the tunnel and observed marked changes in my symptoms, I learned how important support drawn from shared chronic illness experiences are to improved disease management and in certain cases, remission. Through this realization, I went to culinary school to learn the intricacies of preparing healthy yet still delicious food so that I could more thoroughly stay true to my commitment to wellness. My chronic illness ultimately taught me how to thrive in life, directing me towards likeminded people who have had similar health journeys.

At the age of 27, I now work for Lyfebulb in order to help build the chronic disease community that I wish I had from the start of my health journey–especially during my sickest years. Chronic illness strips you of hope and the natural instinct of a chronically-ill person is to curl up and isolate from the rest of the world. My goal is to encourage others who are either creating community or innovation around their disease to come together so that we can make the impact of patient-driven innovation and messages of how to thrive with chronic illness, or of wellness, that much stronger.

Jamie:

I joined Lyfebulb in June of 2019. My role includes the development of partnerships, execution of Innovation Summits, and the management of Lyfebulb’s Patient Entrepreneur Circle. I came to Lyfebulb with a different background than most of my colleagues. Unlike Katie, Karin, and our extended community, I do not suffer from chronic disease, nor do I have loved-ones who do – or so I thought prior to joining Lyfebulb.

Though fortunate on to this end, health and wellness has always been a high priority. With northern California roots, it was instilled upon me at a very young age that it is more than just a lifestyle choice – it is necessary to keep the body and brain sustainable.

Formally, I geared my educational studies towards art history and business. After school, I landed a dream job in the field at an art market transparency company. Four years later, I found myself feeling unfulfilled. Though art will always be a passion, I sought out to find a field where I could make more of an impact.

I found Lyfebulb by chance, attending the UnitedHealth Group Summit activation event for depression and anxiety. Shortly thereafter, I joined the Lyfebulb team and brought the UHG Summit to fruition. Though grateful for my time spent in art, I am grateful to have returned to my path of wellness and health, and look forward to where it will take me.

Cooking Through Life: Valentine’s Day Treat Cheat Guide!

We LOVE treats and sweets, but understand the anxiety that can often come with them! To ensure you enjoy all of the yumminess of Valentine’s Day, without all of the guilt and blood glucose spikes, we have a list of our favorite yummy, healthy brands and recipes, below!

Feel free to send us your favorite sweets, at contact@lyfebulb.com!

  1. Be Mixed:

Be Mixed is one of FAVORITE’S (for many reasons)!

Be Mixed is an all-natural, zero-calorie, sugar-free cocktail mixer. These are great when you are wanting a fun drink, and sick of vodka sodas! 

  1. KNOW Foods

KNOW Foods should be on your list of healthy guilt-free treats, if they aren’t already! Because KNOW uses a sweetener known to have ZERO glycemic effect, Allulose, you can eat the cookies, cakes, muffins, waffles, pastas, and bread, WITHOUT THE GUILT!

Where to buy: KNOWFoods.com, Amazon, & Specialty Grocery Stores

  1. 3. Eating Evolved:

Vegan? Paleo? Peanut Allergy? Well, Eating Evolved’s yummy chocolates and coconut butter cups are my personal favorite dessert (or breakfast)! Eating Evolved’s Sea Salt Caramel Coconut butter Cups are my personal favorite, and an (almost) insulin-free treat!

Where to buy: Whole Foods, Specialty Grocery Stores, eatingevolved.com

  1. Lily’s Sugar Free Chocolate Bars and Baking Chips

Lily’s Chocolates are sweetened with stevia which means CHOCOLATE WITHOUT GUILT!

The baking chips are my favorite to throw in gluten free cookies, or eat by the handful!

  1. Last but not least… MAKE YOUR OWN!

There are so many incredible healthy desserts, that are fun to make for a date night! Here are our top yummy, healthy dessert recipes:

https://www.unconventionalbaker.com/recipes/gluten-free-vegan-raw-strawberry-cheesecake/

http://rachlmansfield.com/paleo-chocolate-chip-cookie-cake/

https://beamingbaker.com/no-bake-paleo-chocolate-almond-butter-bars-4-ingredient-vegan-gluten-free-paleo-dairy-free/

https://beamingbaker.com/paleo-chocolate-almond-butter-fudge-cups-vegan-3-ingredient-gluten-free-paleo-dairy-free/

https://sweetandsavorymeals.com/paleo-coconut-crack-bars-vegan-no-bake/

https://www.bakerita.com/no-bake-lemon-bars-gluten-free-paleo-vegan/

 

*LIFE HACK: experiment! I use the Lakanto Maple Syrup in many recipes to replace maple syrup and create a sugar free dessert!

Try subbing stevia, coconut sugar, or Swerve (1:1 table sugar stevia mix), to make yummy, insulin-free treats! I also LOVE vegan ice cream, and love making my own, out of coconut milk, or even just frozen bananas!

 

Real Talk With Dave: Diabetes is NOT a Diet

When first diagnosed, it may seem as though you are on a diet that is going to restrict you from eating what you once loved. But that is not the case what so ever! On the day when Diabetes comes crashing into your life and presents itself as the worst thing yet, one may feel confused as to what this disease is like and how certain foods will affect you and your daily routine.

When I was first diagnosed back in 2008, I remember feeling scared to eat because what was once an easy thing to do completely turned into a complicated challenge in which I had to measure all my food, eat a balanced meal with the proper nutrients, and calculate the carb and insulin ratios. Before I was diagnosed, I remember having the biggest sweet tooth out there and when the day of my diagnosis came, I felt like that was instantly taken away from me, all to realize that wasn’t the case, at all.

I know that after going to the Endocrinologist for years, they tend to lecture you and make you feel that you should always be eating the proper foods, but every now and then, a cheat day is necessary in order to live a happy (and healthy) lifestyle. If not, burnout can happen from trying to eat all the right foods all the time. I’m not saying that you shouldn’t care for your diet and watch what you eat, but remember, Type 1 Diabetes is most commonly found in children, teens, and young adults who every now and then just need a cheat day or some time to not feel deprived of the foods they once ate freely. Yes, you do need to be as healthy as possible to avoid Diabetic complications later in life, you just need to find balance between your diet and exercise pattern. When you do, you can eat what you like, along with a healthy diet that is best of you.

I went through a stage in my life in which I chose the path of a crash diet in which I would not even touch foods that were high in sugar or where unhealthy and processed. I was a little too careful with my diet and was missing the big picture. I remember at one point, I had it with this diet and missed eating the foods that I used to eat. After some reconsideration, I though to myself how I can still choose to live a happy and healthy lifestyle, all while eating “junk food” in moderation from time to time, as well as not worrying too much on how my numbers were and trying to make them perfect. That wasn’t living.

And I wanted to live, not for the future, but for the present.

I wanted to enjoy each day without living in fear of trying to eat the right foods and have, what I thought were, perfect blood sugars. Yeah I was healthy, but I wasn’t all that happy.

Every now and then you come to a point where you will have to decide what type of lifestyle you truly want, depending on your personality and current situation. Diabetes can be tough when you try and over plan and set limits to yourself. Finding a common balance between what you eat and how it affects you can help when trying to regulate your Diabetes as a whole. It is a lot of work and there will be periods of time in which it is mostly trial and error by simply seeing what works best with your blood sugars, but when you finally feel as though you have figured it out, it will truly feel amazing! You can do it all, eat what you want, not restrict yourself all the time, but just eat in moderation the foods that may not be the stereotypical diet for a Diabetic.

So go ahead, eat that ice cream. And enjoy it. Because even with T1D, you CAN eat ice cream.

Live well,

Dave

5 Food Panaceas For Diabetes That Amaze You

The most decisive measure to be safe and secure from all kind of diseases is the intake of healthy foods. A healthy diet not only provides you with the essential nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and fiber but also it keeps you protected against various diseases and conditions such as diabetes, stroke, heart diseases, and cancer. The diabetic patients usually search for meal plans that consist of food that has balanced insulin levels. The perfect meal plans help diabetic patients to maintain their blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels.

There are various foods that contain a high amount of nutrients and low-glycemic load that is flawless for the diabetic patients. Intake of healthy food can help patients to improve their conditions without medications.

The healthy lifestyle changes and certain healthy foods help in managing blood glucose levels of the people diagnosed with diabetes. Foods that contain healthy fats, low glycemic levels, the protein of high quality, natural sweeteners, and low glycemic fruits are extremely helpful for the diabetic patients because it protects them by reducing the risk of complications related to diabetes.

Here are some food ideas enlisted below that can help the diabetic patients to reduce their complications.

  1. Leafy Green Vegetables
Image source: http://www.livestrong.com

Higher consumption of leafy green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, and other green vegetables are the essential foods for the prevention of diabetes. The leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale, and collard consist of lower levels of calories and carbohydrates, therefore, it is an optimum choice for reducing the risks related to diabetes.

Also, broccoli is considered as an anti-diabetic food. Broccoli consists of a compound called sulforaphane that improves the blood sugar levels. Green vegetables are usually associated with lower levels of HbA1c. Therefore, incorporating a handful of leafy green vegetables into your dishes such as in falafel can be very helpful. You can have this healthy falafel at Falafel Operation Dubai.

2. Nuts

Image source: https://www.drfuhrman.com

Nuts are considered for efficiently preventing the development of insulin resistance because they consist of lower levels of glycemic load. Nuts including almonds, walnuts, cashews, and pistachios are a great source for preventing high cholesterol, diabetes, and glucose intolerance.

Also, the walnuts consist of alpha-linolenic acid, L-arginine, vitamin E, fiber, and omega 3 fatty acids that have anti-diabetic, anti-cholesterol, and anti-inflammatory properties. Almonds, pecans, and walnuts also consist of healthy fat and help to lower the levels of bad cholesterol because they consist of unsaturated fats.

Nuts consist of all the essential vitamins and minerals that are required for the healthy body including, manganese, phosphorus, iron, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. Therefore, it is important to incorporate nuts into your healthy diet in order to prevent diabetes.

3. Sweet Potatoes

Image source: http://lcmhealthnews.org

Sweet potatoes are a great option for the diabetic patients because it is packed with all the essential nutrients. Sweet potatoes consist of the protein of high quality similar to the eggs. It also consists of low carbohydrate content that is perfect for the diabetic patients. It consists of high level of carotenoids and is filled with vitamin E, fiber, vitamin C, and copper.

Also, it is much lower on the glycemic index scale, therefore, it is great for the diabetic patients because it helps in maintaining the blood sugar levels of the body. Moreover, it consists of sufficient amount of dietary fiber that further helps in balancing the blood sugar levels.

Therefore, sweet potatoes are considered a superfood for the diabetic patients because it helps in stabilizing the blood sugar levels by reducing the insulin resistance and also, it reduces the levels of bad cholesterol present in the body.

4. Fish

Image source: https://www.sportsandspinalphysio.com.au

Fish is considered to maintain the blood sugar levels of the body because it does not contain any carbohydrates. Fish consists of the protein of high quality. Also, it consists of adequate amounts of healthy unsaturated fats.

Fish is considered best for the diabetic patients because there is an absence of unhealthy unsaturated fats, cholesterol, and trans fat. Fish falafel from street food Dubai is the greatest source of omega-3 fatty acids that is considered healthy for the heart and also helps in reducing the complications related to diabetes.

The fishes that consist of high levels of omega-3 fatty acids includes salmon, mackerel, trout, Albacore tuna, and herring. Also, fishes help in elevating the levels of good cholesterol in the body.

5. Blueberries

Image source: http://diabetes-mellitus-info.com

Blueberries are considered to lower the risk of diabetes because they are rich in flavonoids. The intake of blueberries results in reducing the insulin resistance and improves the sensitivity of insulin.

Blueberries manage the blood sugar levels by increasing the production of energy through the processing of glucose which helps in fighting against Type -2 diabetes (Reference: http://www.livestrong.com). It reduces the incidence of diabetes efficiently because the blueberries are low on the glycemic index scale. Blueberries consist of all the healthy components such as phytochemicals, fiber, and antioxidants, therefore, it is considered a great option for the diabetic patients.

A New Lyfebulb Favorite: Le Coucou in Nolita

Last Tuesday, Karin and I had the pleasure of trying one of New York’s “hottest” restaurants: Le Coucou. We made a reservation almost a month in advance and could only get a table for two at 5 pm. It worked out well, however, since it allowed us to celebrate my birthday in style, and neither one of us minds eating early. To our surprise, however, the restaurant was almost empty when we arrived, although it steadily became more full as the evening progressed.

First, the service at Le Coucou was phenomenal, from the servers to the sommelier. Everyone was extremely attentive and we never had to worry about our glasses being empty. The bread was delicious (very important) as well.

We chose a bottle of rosé Sancerre, which was delicious. However, because the sommelier did not think it was at the right temperature and wanted to put in on ice for a bit, she offered us two glasses of their rosé by the glass, which was very nice.

The meal began with a very delicate dish of leeks and hazelnuts, which we shared. Karin then moved on to an asparagus and raw tuna dish, while I enjoyed the quenelle. The tuna was of the highest quality and looked absolutely beautiful. Quenelles were my favorite dish growing up in France and I was giddy to have a change to try Le Coucou’s take on the French classic. It was amazing. The quenelle itself was almost like a soufflé made of pike that came in a frothy lobster broth and a lobster claw. Amazing.

Next, Karin enjoyed the raw scallops in a rhubarb jus, presented in a scallop shell. I had the sweetbreads and they were absolutely wonderful. They were served with a creamy mushroom sauce with maitake mushrooms that I could not get enough of. I actually jokingly said I could eat another serving once I was finished (but I wasn’t really joking).

Since it was my birthday dinner, we both ordered desserts, which is very out of character for us, especially Karin as a T1D. This was unfortunately not the highlight of the night. Karin had the chiboust a la vanilla, which was a big spongy cookie type thing and I had what they referred to as a pistachio omelette. I kicked myself for not just ordering another sweetbread…

Despite the disappointing desserts, our experience was phenomenal, and the savory food delicious. We look forward to returning – Barbra Streisand, James Brolin, Meg Ryan, Laura Dern and Gwyneth Paltrow were all seen at the Stephen Starr gem this week, so we are certainly in good company. It is not surprising that it has been listed as one of the most romantic restaurants in the city by TimeOut and is a NYT Critic’s Pick.

Writing this made me long to go back, but it’s not every day you can manage to get into such a great spot!

Vegan Zucchini Chocolate Cake

What you’ll need:

Cake:

  • 280g shredded zucchini
    150g coconut oil
    260g spelt whole wheat flour
  • 100g coconut sugar
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp baking powdrer
  • 3 tbsp chia seeds
  • 3 tbsp unsweetended cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • a pinch of salt

Chocolate topping:

  • 150 g dark vegan chocolate
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 200 g coconut milk

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees celsius
  2. Wash, peel and shred zucchini
  3. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together all the ingredients for the cake
  4. Line the baking form with parchement paper
  5. Evenly spread the cake mixture in the baking form
  6. Let it bake for 20-30 minutes (Tip: Use a toothpick & insert it into the cake. If it comes out clean, the cake is ready to be taken out oft he oven)
  7. Let the chocolate melt over low heat, then add the coconut milk and oil and stir together until well combined
  8. When the cake is ready, take it out of the oven and let it cool down completely – then evenly spread the chocolate topping, leave it to set and cut the cake into squares.
  9. Enjoy! ?

Can we solve food related addictions by retraining our gut to crave healthy food?

Food is part of life – we cannot survive without eating. But for those with addictions or complex relationships with food, that presents a problem. Food is intimately a part of family events, cultural and religious holidays, and for many, enjoying a good meal is what makes them happiest

Living with diabetes means having to inject insulin, take oral drugs and monitor blood sugar levels carefully. However, for all types of diabetes, food plays an important role in the control of blood sugar and the amount of insulin needed to cover a meal. For these individuals, food is no longer just the nutrition they need to survive or a joyous moment in their lives, but a carefully assessed ingredient in the overall treatment program that is diabetes.

Many cultures show love through food, and when one says no to love, one can be faced with consequences, despite the reason. Someone who controls their food intake can seem overly uptight, not fun, and not a happy-go-lucky person. The reactions when you decline something unhealthy due to your disease can be strong, especially if the person serving the food does not know that you have a medical condition.

What is even worse is when the very food that is supposed to make you feel stronger and happier becomes your poison. and you just cannot indulge in even the smallest portions. This is how an eating disorder is born. For a person with diabetes, 200+ extra decisions have to be made daily, but there are still problems that can arise, even if all these decisions were made correctly. One controllable action is to restrict the food, eliminate any temptations and reduce the risk of failure- because failure means near and long term consequences such as passing out due to hypos, or losing your vision and kidney function due to highs.

I restricted my carb intake for several years to the extent that I could lower my insulin injections to a bare minimum and I never had to worry about going low or going high! If you do not eat carbs, and you do not inject large amounts of insulin, blood sugars are stable, but your body suffers due to actual lack of energy. That is not yet diabulimia, but it causes weight loss and an enormous fixation on food.

Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which an individual gives themselves less insulin than they need for the purpose of weight loss.

The transition to full blown diabulimia is dangerous and often happens as a “natural” progression of restriction – when the temptations of food are too great, and you start having some carbs, but you still do not inject insulin! Now, you are still avoiding the lows, but the highs are a constant presence and that is BAD for the long term.

The reverse is when people eat whatever they want, despite their diabetes and keep their blood sugars under control by overdosing on insulin. This may lead to “double diabetes,” which implies added insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes to the already diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Unfortunately, this is becoming a more common phenomenon due to the ease at which one can dose insulin through pumps or pens and the “politically correct” attitude of not restricting diets of especially young patients, of some doctors and parents.

So how do we avoid diabulimia and double diabetes? I believe in training the body to enjoy healthy but nutritious foods. As I mentioned, food is essential to life and it also can be a pleasure in life. The gut-brain relationship is becoming more well understood and I truly believe that if the gut gets exposed to low sugar, low carb but high fiber, lean protein and “good” fat ingredients, the bugs in our gut (microbiome) will start craving more of the same and the brain will feel good and satiated on foods that are not triggers for binging, glucose excursions and feelings of shame. The research area focusing on the microbiome is very interesting to me. The bugs that live in our guts seem to determine what foods we crave, whether we are thin or overweight and may even be part of the cause for autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes.

Our call to action are several-fold:

1: Stop judging people for keeping healthy diets – that is a sign of strength, discipline and a will to survive

2: Be aware of the signs of diabulimia: people with insulin-dependent diabetes with very poor glucose control who when pushed will admit to under-dosing insulin to stay thin

3: Do not encourage double diabetes: when diagnosed with T1D, we cannot eat exactly what we want – that is a fact and an opportunity to be healthier than your peers

3: Learn what foods are good for you and what your systems likes. Stick to this diet for a period of time and you will learn to enjoy it, not just because you want to, but the gut-brain system will be re-trained and you will start dreaming about grilled salmon with mushrooms instead of pasta with cream sauce!

The Best Brazilian Restaurant In NYC- As Told By A Brazilian!

Hi everyone! I’m Bia and I’m going to share a super comfy and tasty restaurant in New York City for those who enjoy good Brazilian food.

I am a type one diabetic and I try to eat healthy food most of the time. In February, I went to New York City for six days and I confess that at the beginning of the trip I was loving all the pizzas, hamburgers and fast food that New Yorkers are used to. But my blood glucose was screaming for healthy food, and for food that I usually eat in Brazil. I live in Rio de Janeiro so my everyday meal consists of rice and beans and I LOVE it!

So, I decided to search for a place in New York to eat some Brazilian food and found a restaurant named BRAZIL BRAZIL near my hotel (Row NYC). The location is great and almost everyone in there speaks Portuguese! I found it amazing because my parents don’t speak English very well so for them it was very easy to order.

The food in this place is delicious and you actually feel like you are in Brazil when you walk through the door. If you go, you must try the Bife à Cavalo and the Picanha na Chapa, I’m sure you will love it! Remember to use double bolus when eating Brazilian food. Our meat has a lot of fat on and it may raise the blood glucose hours later. So be careful!

If you have room, ask for our best dessert: Brigadeiro! It’s amazing and I am sure it is worth counting carbs and taking more insulin for! Hah!

The restaurant is located on 330 W 46th St, close to Times Square.

I hope you enjoy my favorite Brazilian restaurant in Manhattan! Next time I will tell you about my favorite in Brazil for those who want to visit our beautiful, tropical country!

See you in the next post,

Love,
Bia Scher


Follow Lyfebulb Ambassador Bia on IG: @biabetica, and on her blog, www.Biabetica.com

 

The Ultimate Guide to Vegan Protein Sources

“Where do you get your protein?”

It is a question all too common for anyone who has tried to reduce their consumption of animal products. Likewise, it is one of the first concerns one may have after learning about the cruelty and environmental impact of the factory farming industry, or the health risks excess animal products can cause.The idea that a vegan diet is not adequate in protein, even for very active individuals, is a myth that many people believe. However, this is far from the truth.

There are many reasons why this myth is perpetrated, but here are four big ones:

The Incomplete Protein Myth

  1. The “incomplete protein myth” states that you need to combine certain plant foods to get all of the essential amino acids that your body needs. The reality is that ALL plant foods are complete proteins, but some may have higher amounts of certain amino acids than others. As long as your diet is somewhat varied, combining specific foods during meals is unnecessary. Even the creator of the “protein combining” theory has retracted their opinion on this subject.

Uncertainty As to Which Plant Foods are High in Protein

  1. People may think they need animal products to get protein simply because they don’t know how much protein plant foods actually contain. Here is a short list of accessible and easy to prepare foods that illustrate how easy it is to meet daily protein requirements as a vegetarian:
    • Soybeans dried: 100g = 40g protein
    • Lentils: 100g dried = 26g protein
    • Split Peas: 100g dried = 25g protein
    • Oats: 100g dried = 17g protein 
      The list goes on!


 

Weak Anecdotal Evidence

  1. Since a very low percentage of the population are vegan, one may know few, if any, athletes who eat purely vegetarian. Most who are into strength and exercise have been told they need to a lot of animal protein, and they pass this information onto others. This can even include doctors or professional athletes. However, anecdotal claims are not facts, and can be easily skewed or bias. That’s why it is important to be informed of actual facts from properly conducted research rather than individual claims.

Deceptive Marketing Tactics

  1. Food companies are constantly promoting their products as a “good source of protein”. This is a bit of a misnomer since “protein deficiency” is nearly impossible if you are consuming your daily recommended amount of calories. Medical protein deficiency, known as kwashiorkor, is very rare and mainly found in starving populations. Foods such as potatoes or whole wheat pasta are adequate sources of protein that would add up quickly if you consumed 2000 calories of it (we don’t recommend this, though). The most current scientific knowledge on nutrient needs suggest a very active 6 feet tall 180lb man only needs 65g of protein a day. You can check your requirements here.

If you’re interested in learning more about vegan protein sources, check out the full article located at: https://thrivecuisine.com/lifestyle/ultimate-guide-vegan-protein

 

Vegetarian Eggs Benedict: The Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Cookbook

This hearty vegetarian dish will provide you with ample protein and carbohydrates to help you make it through the morning. If you’re not sensitive to dairy, you can also add mozzarella cheese as a topping.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 zucchini (courgette), diced
  • 1 tomato, diced
  • 1 cup (160 g) frozen chopped spinach
  • ¼ cup (25 g) pitted black olives, sliced
  • ½ teaspoon
  • dried rosemary
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 gluten-free English muffins, split in half
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Serves 2

  1. Heat the oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the zucchini (courgette), tomato, spinach, olives, and rosemary, lightly season with salt and pepper, and sauté for about 5 minutes until the zucchini and tomato are softened and the spinach is heated through.
  1. Meanwhile, poach the eggs. Fill a skillet (frying pan) with water and bring the water to a low boil. Break the eggs directly into the simmering water and cook for about 4 minutes until the yolk is as you desire.
  1. While the eggs are poaching, toast the muffins in a toaster.
  1. To assemble, place two muffin halves on each plate and top each muffin half with some sautéed vegetables and a poached egg.

Per serving: 489 kcals, 27.7 g fat (1.2 g saturates), 30.3 g carbohydrate (6.9 g sugars), 25.1 g protein, 7.4 g fiber, 2.2 g salt


Recipe from The Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Cookbook by Dr. Karin M Hehenberger, MD, PhD (CICO Books, $19.95) Photography © CICO Books

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