Newly approved cardiac stent may provide alternative for some patients

FDA APPROVED

There is a concern that cardiac stents are overused.

In fact, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2011 found that only 50 percent of stent procedures reflected in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry, were categorized as appropriate. Back in 2015, a pilot program won grant money from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to understand how physicians make decisions on stenting and other cardiovascular procedures and lay the ground for proper physician education and change.

While value-based care models are making their way into cardiac care, one company in San Antonio, Texas believes that it’s nanocoated stent will appeal to physicians who are looking for alternatives to drug-eluting stents for patients with high risk of bleeding.

CeloNova Biosciences, whose Cobra PzF Nano Coated stent is coated with a thin biocompatible polymer, announced Wednesday that the Food and Drug Administration has approved the device.

One of the device’s chief attractions is that patients need to be on dual anti-platelet therapy for a much shorter period of time following the stenting, said Dennert Ware, executive chairman and acting CEO of CeloNova, in a phone interview prior to the approval. The company’s approval announcement said the DAPT therapy needs to continue for a minimum of 30 days.

Compare that to drug-eluting stents, where DAPT therapy continues for 6-to-12 months following the procedure. For bare metal stents, the period is lower — one month.

COBRA PzF Stent Image

CeloNova’s Cobra stent is made of cobalt chromium with a proprietary Polyzene-F nano-thin polymer. Data presented to FDA for approval found that stent thrombosis — a complication of stenting — was non-existent 9 months after the Cobra was inserted.

Device thrombosis occurs when a thrombus or blood clot suddenly forms in a stented coronary artery impeding blood flow…

Arterys Cardio DL Application for Cardiac MRI Ventricle Segmentation FDA Cleared

Arterys software

Arterys, a San Francisco firm, won FDA clearance, following recent European CE Mark approval, to introduce its Arterys Cardio DL software that automates the process of segmenting ventricles on cardiac MRI imaging scans. Arterys claims that in a clinical setting the application is able to perform segmentation as…

Remembering These Heart Attack Symptoms Could Mean the Difference Between Life and Death

Spotting heart attack symptoms early can potentially save a life. How do you spot them? Our friends at YourTango share their story.

Pay attention.

The recent deaths of Carrie Fisher (due to a heart attack) and George Michael (due to heart failure) bring this year to a close with even more significant grief and loss.

Now, more than ever, it’s important to remember that heart disease is the number one cause of death not just for African-American and white women in the United States, but for people of most ethnicities when statistics by genders are combined.

While we tend to think of heart disease as an issue affecting only older adults, some forms — such as Cardiovascular disease (CVD) — may begin during childhood.

Evidence of fatty deposits in heart valves — a sign of CVD that can develop into multiple serious problems later in life — has been found in children as young as in infancy. When we are still young the build of these deposits typically develops without any obvious symptoms, so identifying and managing the known risk factors from the very start of life is crucial. In addition to possible hereditary factors, hormonal changes, fatty foods, alcohol, smoking, and variables such as anemia, a sedentary lifestyle, and traditional American dietary habits today subject our hearts to stress at an increasingly unprecedented level.

The wide variety of heart and cardiovascular diseases causes a good deal of confusion.

For example, while many of us think the terms ‘cardiac arrest’ and ‘heart attack’ are one and the same, they are actually quite different from one another.

According to The American Heart Association:

“A heart attack occurs when a blocked artery prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching a section of the heart. If the blocked artery is not reopened quickly, the part of the heart normally nourished by that artery begins to die. The longer a person goes…

Researchers develop novel tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients

For the first time, researchers have developed tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients by diagnosing the condition with greater accuracy, as well as by detecting the onset of congestive heart failure earlier. The findings were published in the Cardiovascular Disease issue of Clinical Chemistry, the journal of AACC.

Heart failure occurs when the heart is weakened and can no longer pump blood adequately. There are numerous conditions that can damage the heart muscle and lead to heart failure, from coronary artery disease to diabetes to drug abuse, and in the U.S., it is the leading cause of hospitalization for people older than age 65. At present, the main blood tests used to aid in the diagnosis of heart failure are those for B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). However, natriuretic peptide tests have a high false positive rate and a limited ability to detect the early and asymptomatic stages of the disease.

With the goal of overcoming the drawbacks of current heart failure tests, a group of researchers developed a diagnostic panel that provides a more comprehensive representation of the heart’s functioning by measuring multiple biological molecules. Led by Hugo A. Katus, MD, PhD, of Heidelberg University Hospital in Heidelberg, Germany, the researchers began by identifying 92 metabolites—or byproducts of the body’s metabolism—that changed significantly in heart failure patients compared with healthy individuals. They chose three of these metabolites that belong to the lipid classes of sphingomyelins, triglycerides, and phosphatidylcholines for their…

Carrie Fisher’s Death Highlights The Reality Of Heart Disease In Women

Carrie Fisher died Tuesday at the age of 60, four days after suffering a heart attack on a flight from London to Los Angeles.

Carrie Fisher died early Tuesday morning, four days after suffering a heart attack on a flight from London to Los Angeles. The actress and author, best known for her iconic role as Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” franchise, was 60 years old.

Experts say that Fisher’s death highlights an important reality about heart disease: It is the leading cause of death among men and women alike in the U.S.

While heart disease encompasses many different conditions, a heart attack occurs when coronary arteries become blocked and oxygenated blood can’t reach the heart. About 735,000 Americans have heart attacks every year, but the signs and risk factors that preface a heart attack can be different for men and women.

General risk factors for heart disease include diabetes, lack of exercise and smoking. But additional clues can help tip women off to their risk, said Dr. Nieca Goldberg, a cardiologist and medical director of the women’s heart program at New York University’s Langone Medical Center.

“Most people are familiar with a pretty typical ‘Hollywood’ type of heart attack, where somebody’s clutching their chest and the pain rolls down their arm or up the neck,” Goldberg said. “And while women may have that classic symptom, many times women have symptoms that don’t scream out ‘heart attack.’”

The best way to prevent cardiac-related deaths is for women to understand their own personal risk factors and be able to recognize the signs of a heart attack, which may be different from a man’s experience.

How heart attacks are different for women

Women may describe their heart attack signs as “flu-like,” with nausea, dizziness, weakness, shortness of breath, fatigue and back pain. While they might feel pain in their torso, it could be off-center or lower down, where it can be mistaken for a stomach issue, Goldberg said.

Women’s heart attack symptoms can be different from men’s because the condition tends to be more diverse in women, says Dr. Jennifer Mieres, a professor of cardiology at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association.

For instance, men are more likely to have an obstruction in their arteries, while in women coronary heart disease is caused by a wide spectrum of issues, including non-obstructive coronary artery disease (a condition where the arteries are not blocked but still don’t transport blood efficiently) or atherosclerosis, which is when the arteries harden and narrow.

Women are likely to put off seeking care for longer than men. One study found that it took a…

Nanowear gets FDA clearance for cardiac-monitoring clothing

New York City-based Nanowear has received FDA clearance for SimpliECG, a “remote cardiac-monitoring undergarment”. This is the first clearance for the company, which has been in talks with the FDA since 2015, according to a press release.

“This is a big milestone for our young company,” Cofounder and CEO Venk Varadan said in a statement. “The FDA’s decision not only positions us for commercial opportunities in remote cardiac monitoring, but more importantly, it provides accreditation of the company’s one-of-a-kind, cloth-based sensor technology as medical-grade. This is the first step and foundation of what we believe to be an extensive array of applications for our nanosensor technology – including numerous other electrical, biometric and biochemical signals that can be measured directly from the skin without conductive gels, adhesives or skin preparation. The market of applications for healthcare alone is a multi-billion-dollar…

Obesity and diabetes by middle age tied to heart failure later on

People who reach middle age without developing high blood pressure, diabetes or obesity may have a lower risk of heart failure later in life, a recent study suggests.

Obesity, diabetes and hypertension can lead to structural changes in the heart that increase the stiffness of the muscle and reduce its ability to contract forcefully. These structural and functional changes in the muscle reduce the ability to circulate blood, which can lead to heart failure.

Compared to people with all three risk factors – high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity – adults who had none of these health problems by age 45 were 73 percent less likely to develop heart failure over the rest of their lifetime, the study found.

And when people reached 55 without any of these three risk factors, they were 83 percent less likely to develop heart failure than adults who did have these problems.

“Preventing the onset of obesity, hypertension and diabetes will substantially lower a person’s risk for heart failure and substantially increase the average number of years they will live healthy,” said senior study author Dr. John Wilkins of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

“The benefits of preventing the onset of the risk factors themselves often far exceeds the benefits experienced through treatment of the risk factors after they’ve developed,” Wilkins added by email.

Approximately 5.7 million adults in the United States currently suffer from heart failure, researchers note in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Heart Failure.

This population faces a significantly reduced quality of life and higher mortality rates. Hypertension, obesity and diabetes are highly prevalent and preventable risk factors for heart failure,…

Obesity and diabetes by middle age linked to increased heart failure risk

Preventing the onset of obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes in middle age ‘will substantially increase the average number of years a person lives healthily’, according to a recent study.

Conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity are known to increase a person’s risk of developing heart failure, which causes structural damage to the heart and reduces its ability to circulate blood around the body.

Adults who present none of these conditions by 45 years old were 73 per cent less likely to develop heart failure, and those who reached 55 years without the conditions were 83 per cent less likely.

The key to prevention of heart failure is weight control along with regular monitoring of blood pressure and blood sugar levels, according to Dr Mary Norine Walsh, medical director of heart failure and cardiac transplantation at St. Vincent Heart Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

Commenting on the study, she said: “Keeping your weight under control pays off later in life, and monitoring your blood pressure and blood sugar with your physician is crucial. Avoiding all three of these conditions can add years to your life.”

Researchers analysed data of tens of thousands of men and women in the US up to the age of 95 or death. Of these, 53 per cent did not have diabetes, hypertension or obesity at age 45 and fewer than one per cent had all three risk factors at that age.

Around 44 per cent of adults aged 55 were not presenting any of the three risk factors for heart failure; 2.6 per cent had all three.

A total of 1,677 cases of heart failure were identified among adults from the age of 45 and a further 2,976 cases were found in those aged 55 or over.

Dr. John Wilkins of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, senior study author, said: “Preventing the onset of obesity, hypertension and diabetes will substantially lower a person’s risk for heart failure and substantially increase the average number of years they will live healthy.

“The benefits of preventing the onset of the risk factors themselves often far exceeds the benefits experienced through treatment of the risk factors after they’ve developed.”

Men, women of all races and backgrounds who showed no signs of any of the three risk factors by the age of 45 or 55 were notably less likely to develop heart failure as they aged with men at 45 living an average of 10.6 years longer than their counterparts with all three and women living an average of 14.9 years longer.

The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Heart Failure.

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Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is commonly known as Type 2 Diabetes
Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is commonly known as Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar it’s likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

Type 2 diabetes statistics

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), more than 371 million people across the globe have diabetes and this figure is predicted to rise to over 550 million by 2030.

Of the total global diabetes rate, 90% are living with type 2 diabetes but it is estimated that up to half of these people are unaware of their condition (undiagnosed diabetes).

In the UK, more than 2.7 million people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes whilst a further 750,000 people are believed to have the symptoms but are yet to be diagnosed with the disease.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical…

Diabetes increases risk of developing heart failure earlier in life

Heart Failure

Certified Medical Assistant Vanissa Stralnic, C.M.A., said she has had type-1 diabetes since 1987, and it may affect her health in the long run

Stralnic explained. “My life expectancy could be short, I’ve heard that it could be anywhere from 15 to twenty-five years shorter than the normal person that doesn’t have the diabetes.”

Cardiologist, Chippy Nalluri, M.D., of Heart Specialists of Sarasota said, “Almost 70-percent of patients with diabetes age 65 or older, die of some form of heart disease.”

Dr. Nalluri added that

I have type 1 diabetes, it was 1987, so I’ve been diabetic for like 25 years.

CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT VANISSA STRALNIC SAYS DIABETES MAY AFFECT HER HEALTH IN THE LONG RUN

My life expectancy could be short, I’ve heard that it could be anywhere from 15 to twenty five years shorter than the normal person that doesn’t have the diabetes.

Almost 70 percent of patients with diabetes age 65 or older, die of some form of heart disease

KATHY DART OF NORTH PORT HAS TYPE 2 DIABETES

Since I was recently diagnosed I really hadn’t been concerened with it, until I guess now.

If you are diabetic, you have anywhere from a…

Edwards makes another big acquisition in the transcatheter mitral valve space, this time for $690M

Dollar handshake

Edwards Lifesciences, the Irvine, California-based medical device company is betting big on the transcatheter mitral valve therapies.

On Monday, the structural heart company that dominates the transcatheter aortic valve replacement market in the U.S. announced that it is buying Valtech Cardio, an Israeli company for up to $690 million. Valtech Cardio has developed the Cardioband System to repair mitral and tricuspid valves using catheters.

When the transaction closes in early 2017, Edwards will fork up $340 million in cash and stock with the promise to make milestone payments of an additional $350 million over the next decade. Those “pre-specified” milestone payments were not clearly spelled out but, usually, involve regulatory approvals and revenue goals for novel products that acquirers like Edwards hope will be successful in the marketplace.

Instead of surgically repairing the problem, the Cardioband System uses a transcatheter approach to place a reconstruction implant for patients suffering from functional mitral regurgitation. In functional MR, the left ventricle of the heart is enlarged, and that leads to a displacing of the papillary muscles that support the two valve leaflets and the stretching the valve opening known as the annulus. As a result, valve leaflets fail to come together to close the annulus causing blood to flow back into the atrium, a dangerous condition that can cause heart failure.

Through the Cardioband System, a catheter…

Taking two drugs could combat heart complication in diabetes

A heart condition brought on by high blood sugar could be prevented by taking two drugs, according to new research.

Scientists from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) have studied how heart arrhythmias in patients with diabetes can be reversed, which could have implications for treating heart disease.

The study, coordinated by Professor Emiliano Medei, from the Institute of Biophysics Carlos Chagas Filho and CENABIO at UFRJ, showed that an increase in blood sugar levels causes inflammation and the production of IL-1-bete which, over a number of years, can lead to arrhythmias of the heart.

Professor Medei said: “It is noteworthy that inflammation is an important tool to fight infections, which usually ends when the ‘intruder’ is removed.

“In the case of diabetes, there is no infection. Persistent hyperglycemia stimulates the immune system to produce a constant inflammation, with great production of IL-1-beta. We found inflammation to be the link between arrhythmias and diabetes.”

Diabetes was induced in mice and other animals known to be unable to produce the inflammation required to stimulate the making of IL-1-beta.

The animals were induced to produce increased blood glucose, and the mice that were able to produce the inflammation had altered heart rates.

Those unable to produce the inflammation and therefore IL-1-beta experienced much less damage from arrhythmias, even when given substances known to increase a dysregulation in the heart rhythm called ventricular tachycardia.

To rectify the problem the research team administered two drugs known to inhibit the inflammatory process: MCC-950 and anakinra, which proved to be successful.

The drugs work to block production of IL-1-beta and protect body cells from being damaged by the effects of IL-1-beta, and were able to reverse the heart changes in the diabetic mice. They are already commonly used in the treatment of other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Prof Medai added: “I believe that the new therapeutic tools that we propose in this study are very promising to treat heart disease caused by diabetes.”

The findings have been published in Nature Communications.

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Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is commonly known as Type 2 Diabetes
Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is commonly known as Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar it’s likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

Type 2 diabetes statistics

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), more than 371 million people across the globe have diabetes and this figure is predicted to rise to over 550 million by 2030.

Of the total global diabetes rate, 90% are living with type 2 diabetes but it is estimated that up to half of these people are unaware of their condition (undiagnosed diabetes).

In the UK, more than 2.7 million people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes whilst a further 750,000 people are believed to have the symptoms but are yet to be diagnosed with the disease.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage.

Following pre-diabetes or metabolic disorder, type 2 diabetes can potentially be avoided through diet and exercise.

What causes…

Consumption of polyphenols improves heart health in type 2 diabetes, says study

Older adults with type 2 diabetes could improve their heart health by consuming greater quantities of foods or beverages containing polyphenols, research suggests.

Polyphenols are compounds found in natural plant food sources such as fruits, vegetables, extra virgin olive oil, tea and wine. In this new study, the effects of polyphenols were tested on 2,753 adults with type 2 diabetes aged 50 to 75 years.

Scientists at the University of Naples Federico II evaluated the association between the total intake of polyphenols and polyphenol classes with the major cardiovascular risk factors (heart risk factors) among the type 2 population.

They observed that participants who had a higher polyphenol intake had lower BMI, waist and hip circumference, as well as more favourable cardiovascular risk profiles. These findings existed after adjusting for factors that could bias the results.

“These findings support the consumption of foods and beverages rich in different classes of polyphenols particularly in people with diabetes,” said the researchers, whose results appear online in the Clinical Nutrition journal.

The two most predominant classes of polyphenols were flavonoids, found in citrus fruit such as grapefruit, and phenolic acids, found in the skins and seeds of fruits. These classes accounted for 95 per cent of total polyphenol intake.

To assess dietary habits, participants completed a questionnaire to evaluate their polyphenol intake, with blood pressure and HbA1c among the health markers measured.

The researchers noted that these findings might not be significant at a clinical level, but could still have benefits for people with type 2 diabetes.

For more information on how to eat healthily and tackle type 2 diabetes, visit the Low Carb Program. Last week, the program was awarded the Positive Social Impact Award at the Lloyds Bank National Business Awards UK 2016.

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Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is commonly known as Type 2 Diabetes
Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 is commonly known as Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body:

  • Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or
  • Being unable to produce enough insulin

Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body.

From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar.

The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar it’s likely you will never need long-term medication.

Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide.

Type 2 diabetes statistics

According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), more than 371 million people across the globe have diabetes and this figure is predicted to rise to over 550 million by 2030.

Of the total global diabetes rate, 90% are living with type 2 diabetes but it is estimated that up to half of these people are unaware of their condition (undiagnosed diabetes).

In the UK, more than 2.7 million people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes whilst a further 750,000 people are believed to have the symptoms but are yet to be diagnosed with the disease.

How serious is type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious medical condition that often requires the use of anti-diabetic medication, or insulin to keep blood sugar levels under control. However the development of type 2 diabetes and its side effects (complications) can be prevented if detected and treated at an early stage.

Following pre-diabetes or metabolic disorder, type 2 diabetes can potentially be avoided through diet and exercise.

What causes type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the hormone insulin is not used effectively by the cells in your body. Insulin is needed for cells to take…