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JT’s #RealT1DLyfe: Channeling the Difficulties of Chronic Disease into a Compassionate Career in Medicine

Living with Type 1 for the last 15 years has been simultaneously absolutely exhausting and a compelling/ continuous opportunity for personal growth and empathy-building with other patients of chronic diseases.

My grandmother came to live with my family when I was seven- in very poor health. Unfortunately, like many living in remote rural settings, she lacked access to routine healthcare, and her diabetes had already begun damaging her nerves, affecting her sight, and impairing her kidney function by the time she was diagnosed. My experience with diabetes became even more personal five years later when my own diagnosis was similarly delayed in rural East Texas.

After earning my BS/ MA in Biology and running track at Baylor University, I moved to California to attend Stanford Medical School, and am currently applying to attend residency in Ophthalmology.*Editor’s Note: JT has just been accepted to the program at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, congratulations JT!  During medical school, I’ve been able to start a Bay Area running group and training sessions for young and newly diagnosed diabetics to learn to manage their sugars during exercise. I am also a Dexcom Warrior and Lyfebulb Ambassador, and currently conduct research demonstrating how internet search traffic can be used to locate pockets of patients in need of diabetes-related surgical procedures or healthcare, such as diabetic retinopathy screening programs.

We all know how difficult diabetes can make everyday life – as patients, family members, significant others, across the board. Having been a patient dealing with a chronic disease that affects you every minute of every day has definitely given me a unique perspective and empathy for patients that I wish more doctors could experience. It’s very difficult to see the underlying stress, fear, and frustration that accompany a chronic illness like diabetes. In that way, being diabetic has pushed me to become a better physician and I am so grateful that I get to talk with and encourage other diabetics in the hospital regardless of which service I’m working with.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out! Jonathan Tijerina jdt2015@stanford.edu @jonathan.david.tijerina

My 10 Year Pancreas Transplant Anniversary: A Thank You Letter to the Family who Decided to Offer Their Daughter’s Pancreas

Jan 2, 2010 was the day of my pancreas transplant. This means I have been insulin independent again for exactly 10 years since my T1D diagnosis at age 16.
No words can fully describe how this gift changed my life for the better and how much the experience taught me about the reality of living with T1D. In fact, much of the foundation of Lyfebulb came from these insights: patients need patients and patients can be innovators. Two very important concepts that I only understood after my pancreas transplant.

I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes in July of 1989, and the disease had never fully become a part of me. I hated it from the beginning, and never worked to embrace it. However, I did work hard to study the disease, both as a student of medicine and science as well as a businesswoman later on in my career. I wanted so desperately to get rid of it and I also refused to let it limit me. But it did. I realized how much I was truly burdened by this chronic disease once I was free from having to constantly think about my blood sugar and insulin dosing.

Diabetes took something from me that I never got back, even after regaining insulin independence through transplantation, which was my innocence and belief in happy endings. However, it taught me that fighting would forever be an essential part of my new reality and that being different was always my destiny.

Ten years ago on that morning in January, when I was on the table waiting to be put under and cut open, I had no memory of what life looked like without T1D. Almost 12 hours later, I woke up in great pain but, for the first time in quite a while, was already producing my own insulin that started to heal my failing body.

When I was discharged from the hospital, thus began my road to recovery. I had already been through one transplant nine months prior (a kidney from my father), so I was put on the same drugs, and was in better shape than I was before my first transplant. Only 10 days before my pancreas transplant, I had passed out and hit my forehead on the dishwasher corner, which led to a broken nose, cracked open forehead, and the loss of a couple of teeth. This accident was due to my T1D, so the transplant was extremely urgent. Although my face was still bruised from the accident, I was ready to fight for my new life during this period of recovery and each day, I got a little better.

The first few days after the surgery, I was weak, but I made a point out of walking a little each day and making careful food choices to gain strength. I had learned from my kidney transplant that there were certain foods that were better with the immune suppressants. These particular foods helped my stomach to handle the heavy drugs so I had a lot of toast, bananas and soup. I needed gentle and mild sustenance so I avoided spice and anything raw or fibrous. Interestingly, my diet has not changed much since my time with T1D. I still cannot eat foods like pizza, pancakes, pasta or rice. Although I’ve slowly added sweet potatoes and some bread to my diet, the psychology of living a low-carb life does not pass easily!

After a week, I could leave the hospital and after two weeks, I was cleared to fly back home to New York from Minnesota where I had my surgery. I remember it being such a happy trip back, with a newly felt freedom where I had no need for insulin or glucose testing. I felt like my life was starting again!

Only one week later back in New York, I started to feel tired and very weak. Something was clearly not right, and I went to the hospital late at night after speaking to my physician. Sadly, I had an infection and was readmitted to the hospital. I was now at Columbia Presbyterian, since that is where my local transplant care is based. It took another week before they isolated the cause for my infection. It was an abscess close to the pancreas, which needed to be drained and cleaned. To do so, I had a tube inserted into my abdomen and a bag hanging from it, which collected the nasty bacterial fluid 24/7. This went on for an entire month and it came with a period of intense pain. Every time I spoke, moved or coughed, it hurt. Laughing was impossible! After the tube was removed, marking the end to this difficult time, I was on the mend and my journey toward health was back on track.

Today, 10 years after that incredible day, I think back to the family whose young daughter died and the decision they made to donate her organs, which changed my life (and most likely many others’). I cannot imagine how they must have felt that day, but since I now have a little daughter of my own, I understand the emotions that come from seeing your child in pain.

To this family: I thank you from the bottom of my heart. I promise you to take very good care of your daughter’s pancreas, to do as much GOOD with my life as possible and to never, ever take anything for granted. I learned too early that life is a constant fight, and I know too intimately the fear that comes when you are close to losing it. If the kidney transplant saved my life, the pancreas from your daughter made it worth living again.

Somewhat symbolically, today is also the day for Lyfebulb, the company I co-founded five years ago, to enter into the transplant space. We are already in six other disease areas; Diabetes, Cancer, MS, IBD, Mental illness and Migraine. We will be building a community online and in-person for people living with transplants and their care partners. We will be searching for the best new, innovative solutions to improve quality of life by listening to people who have been through the process of a transplant. I am proud to make this announcement since it is a population that, so far, has not had a real home and where innovation is far from fully exhausted.

Happy New Year AND New Decade!

Tools to Thrive: Running for T1D Management and Entrepreneurship

Many of us, including myself, face the difficulty of keeping blood sugar levels elevated during sessions of intense activities like running. Yet, if practiced correctly, running can be an awesome therapy for the physical and mental health of those in the #T1D community.

Insulin keeps me alive, but it isn’t the only therapy I use to manage my diabetes. I combine my prescribed insulin regimens with running in order to optimize my blood sugar. By committing time in my weekly schedule to running, I see drastic improvements in my blood sugar levels and I require fewer boluses of insulin, simply because I have fewer instances of hyperglycemia.

Let’s talk specifics: on a day that I want to run, I will be sure to have a pre-run snack like a banana to ensure that I don’t go low. Also, I always share my route with my girlfriend, so she knows where I am while I run around. Lastly, I find an awesome playlist that has my favorite tunes, specifically songs by Chance the Rapper. After making the appropriate preparations, I hit the road and begin feeling the benefits physically and mentally. Having the opportunity to exercise clears my head, reduces my stress, increases my cardiovascular health, and regulates my blood sugar. All of these benefits are super important to take advantage of as a patient entrepreneur managing both a chronic disease and a business.

You don’t need to hit the ground running, though (no pun intended)! Walking and jogging are also great starts, just as long as you get moving! These types of exercises can drop blood sugar levels fast, so supplementing your running with healthy snacks and meals is crucial. Be sure to check out some articles (below) if you’re interested in running with #T1D. Remember, don’t let type 1 stop the run!

Check out John’s recommended resources on running and T1D, with an addition from Lyfebulb Ambassador Christel Oerum of Diabetes Strong:

1) https://beyondtype1.org/a-runners-guide-to-t1d/

2) https://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-weight-loss/a20834290/how-to-fuel-for-a-long-run-with-type-1-diabetes/

3) https://diabetesstrong.com/started-running-type-1-diabetes/

 

 

Optimizing Diet and Exercise as Tools for Managing T1D: Thoughts from an Entrepreneurial Certified Diabetes Educator

Colette finished her Master’s degree in Clinical Nutrition to become a Registered Dietician and a Certified Diabetes Educator. She is also a board-certified Sports Dietician, inspired by her former career in professional bodybuilding.

I have been living with Type 1 diabetes since 1984, signifying 35 years with the disease. I have watched some of my dreams come true including the Dexcom G6, a better basal insulin (Tresiba) and a noninvasive way to take insulin, Afrezza.  I understand the physiologic benefit to being on an insulin pump, especially those that DIY close loop their pumps and have basal modulation to help keep blood sugars in range, even if you don’t quite get the carb counting correct.

My issue with wearing all these devices comes with being a professional athlete.  Although I don’t compete anymore, I still try to live my life around a bodybuilding lifestyle, which means going to the gym five to six times per week.  I never liked being attached to a pump and having to find that perfect spot to put your infusion site.  I wear a weight belt when I train, which rules out my entire midsection, leaving only my right and left glute and outer thighs.  That didn’t work too well for me and I developed severe lipohypertrophy. Now, Afrezza and Tresiba offer me more freedom with much less worry around low blood sugar due to its fast in / fast out absorption.

While waiting for advances in T1D management, I have found that the best advice is to minimize the amount of insulin you need to inject before each meal and maximize your insulin sensitivity so that you don’t require that much basal insulin.  It is also crucial to keep in mind that the more carbs you eat, the more basal insulin you will need.  Insulin is NOT predictable, especially the injected, rapid-acting insulins.  In order to perfectly time them, you really need to inject 20-30 minutes before you eat in order to match up the peak of the food with the peak of the insulin.  To manage this difficulty more effectively, try to have your blood sugar < 100 mg/dl before eating.  That way, you have less insulin resistance.  It is also important to differentiate between the two sources of glucose when a person with diabetes eats – liver glucose and food glucose.  The best approach is NOT a keto diet because it is too difficult to sustain long term and, quite frankly, who wants to eat all that fat!  A true keto diet is comprised of 70% fat. We need more antioxidants and micronutrients than what can fit in the remaining 30%.  My T1D management diet philosophy includes high protein, moderate healthy fats and high fiber carbs such as legumes, vegetables, bean pastas, low carb wraps, spaghetti squash/acorn squash/butternut squash, and artichokes. Keeping the fiber high offsets how quickly carbohydrates turn to sugar, thereby giving insulin time to work and suppress the liver from producing glucose. It also allows for more variety in one’s diet and the one thing that the ketogenic diet lacks: fiber.  I have been following this diet throughout my competition years and continue to do so now.  This is not a fad diet, but instead a way of life and approaching food choices.  Understanding the unpredictability of insulin, we can infer that the more we need to take it, the more unpredictable it becomes. Optimizing diet as a tool is simple: eat the foods that require less insulin to ensure greater predictability and better blood sugar control.

Exercise is also another key component to my success. Similar to making dietary changes, this also was not without struggle.  Given that I love to weight train, high volume, high intensity weight training sessions involving my legs and back would often raise my blood sugar > 100 mg/dl.  I would have to take insulin on an empty stomach before my workout in order to keep in normal range. Interestingly, it is typically the stroll in the park when your blood sugar drops because it is non-stressful and does not promote the secretion of adrenaline and cortisol.  Don’t be surprised if you need insulin to workout, as it was common practice for myself for quite some time.

My last suggestion is to not be afraid of the lows.  My patients would rather be low than high. Although all too often our doctors want us to stay high where there are less short-term consequences, I stand by this statement. If you are wearing a CGM and more aware of your trends and predictability, incidences doctors worry about like insulin shock and passing out should not be happening.  If you ate something and think you might have taken too much insulin, be prepared with 1-2 glucose tabs.  You often don’t need that much when taking smaller amounts of insulin at each meal, especially if also following a low carb lifestyle. Even if you took one extra unit, we aren’t talking about a severe low.  It is also always important to choose a straight glucose source rather than food. If you take a glucose tab, it won’t cause that same reaction as food, resulting in more predictable rebound sugar and less weight gain.

The reality is we can’t just stop taking our insulin, but we can help it work better and be more user-friendly. Minimalizing the amount of insulin you take is one step towards better management.

To summarize, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder, meaning there is no cure at this point in time. However, through efficient application of dietary practices and the implementation of a fitness routine, you can create a maintainable lifestyle that will ultimately make your diabetes more manageable.

#RealT1DLyfe Liz’s Story: Finding New Solutions while Caring for a Child with Type 1 Diabetes

Throughout my life diabetes had been an illness I knew little about and was fortunate enough not to have experienced myself or through loved ones. That all changed in 2011, when my oldest of four boys (David) was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 9. As a family we were overwhelmed, scared, and uneducated about the disease. As a mother, my first thought was, “What can I do to help my child?” I knew all the emotions I was feeling and could only try to imagine the thoughts that were running through my child’s young head. Immediately my stoic side came out, trying to calm this frightening situation. This was all new territory for us. The only absolute was to provide love, support, and willingness to learn everything I could about this new disease that just struck our family.

Although I do not live with the disease personally, anyone who has a loved one affected by this terrible burden knows that management is not solely the responsibility of the individual diagnosed– especially when it is a child. Inherently as a mother you worry. Add that to that the worry of a child living with a chronic disease, and suddenly the threshold is increased to a whole new level. It is with you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Throughout the course of adjusting to our new lifestyle of insulin injections, carb counting, and blood glucose tests, I soon realized there was a missing component in the testing routine. A clean, simple solution to safely remove the excess blood left on the finger after testing sugar levels. Testing his blood anywhere from 6-10 times a day was the norm. Inevitably, David would wipe the blood either on his clothes or the inside of his case. After searching the marketplace, without success of finding a product for this unmet need, I took matters into my own hands. Being passionate about helping the diabetes community, I conceived, patented, and developed Diabetic Dabs®; booklets of absorbent sheets designed with an adhesive backing to attach to any testing kit.

My goal is to help families such as mine simplify managing diabetes and hopefully inspire others to act where shortfalls present themselves. We are all in this together; being a member of this community, our mission is to eradicate this horrible disease.

There is no stress-free way to handle the responsibilities, the highs, the lows, and emotions that come along with diabetes. However, there is a way to take control—and that is through mindset. I felt it was my responsibility as a parent to teach David that mindset determines your path in life. Mindset and perspective can turn a positive situation negative or a negative situation positive. Sometimes life throws curve balls at us—and it is in those moments that we decide how we will handle them. My goal is to empower those in the diabetes community to have a voice and make a difference!

Get real with T1D!

#RealT1DLyfe Sara’s Story: Type 1 Diabetes, Food and Eating Disorders

Being diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes is far from the best news I’ve ever received. However, I had the best support from family, friends and healthcare professionals. Thanks to this support system from day one, I felt confident that I could maintain a positive mindset, even though I knew there would be many tough periods ahead.

I have always tried to look and act “perfect” on the outside by not making a fool of myself and not creating unnecessary conflicts so that I would be accepted and respected. All of these behaviors striving for “perfection” have in some way affected the history of my T1D.

For better or worse, I have always placed significant value on my appearance. I have always strived for something that is ultimately superficial and should not really matter in the scheme of things. The combined stress of how I saw myself in the mirror and my perfect blood sugar curves eventually turned into a minor disaster.

Sara Moback thin

I learned quite quickly when I was diagnosed with T1D how food affected my blood sugar. I learned how many units of insulin I needed to maintain a relatively stable blood sugar. Together, the time and effort I dedicated towards food while I began to think more about how my body looked, as well as other important happenings in my private life, led to an awful disease – anorexia nervosa in 2016. This part of my life was probably the worst. I do not really know where my strength came from, but I eventually managed to contact a clinic that helped me, and this was the beginning of a journey to a healthier life.

I made significant progress once I started working with my body instead of against it. Before, the nutrition of what I was eating was not important to me. The most important thing at that time was for any food I consumed to not affect my blood sugar.  Now, I realize how much of an impact my T1D had on the way I considered food and my overall diet.

Receiving a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes was traumatic because it meant I couldn’t live life as I knew it. It is difficult to change habits and ways of life – even the small, everyday habits. The additional diagnosis of anorexia made this even more difficult. After a long time spent in treatment, I had overcome most of the difficulties I encountered with my disease. I had a tough time when it came to relationships, jobs and figuring out what life meant to me.

Today, I have come a long way in my recovery. However, food is an integral part of my life and I will never be able to get rid of the thoughts of what my next meal will look like. It is a feeling that a person with T1D can never truly get rid of. Some days I feel strong because I do not struggle with my thoughts surrounding food and T1D at all. While other days, I feel the heavy burden of T1D, although I don’t always show it.

If people around us knew the extend of how hard we work to keep our bodies and souls alive, they would be shocked. Although many still do not and most likely will never fully understand, the most important thing is that you are aware of the choices that make you feel good.

Sara Moback full length

 

#RealT1DLyfe Chris’s Story: Type 1 Diabetes and Suicide

As anyone with Type 1 diabetes knows, life can be an absolute roller coaster. I would like to take you on a personal journey of mine going into the darkest of hours, but coming out in the brightest of days. Back in June of 1988, my diagnosis marked not the first or second, but fifth Type 1 diabetes diagnosis for my family. Already having lost an uncle to Type 1 in the same year, my diagnosis likely hit my family harder than I will ever know. However, growing up having two family members who passed from T1D complications weighed heavy on my mind. It didn’t help that at a young age, I heard a doctor tell my mother, “if he sees 30, feel lucky.” Growing up, T1D never completely stopped me from doing things, but often had a way of interfering. Going to play soccer as a kid, I had a coach say I couldn’t play because he didn’t want a kid dying on his field. Name calling, being told I wasn’t good enough, and the like made me angry in the moment, but ultimately sat deeper within my subconscious for twenty years into adulthood, slowly taking its toll.

Getting out on my own is where my life took a darker turn. Around 2011, I fell into a deep depression and I almost didn’t make my way out. My blood sugars were rarely where I needed them to be. It was also a constant roller coaster at work. Eat then work, forget to bolus, go high, then crash, and repeat. Although I was consistently out of range, my reasonable a1c kept my doctor at bay, all while hiding the fact I was miserable mentally. Relationships were impossible to maintain with my depression and blood sugars as they were and I began to isolate myself alone with my thoughts. The thoughts escalated from “your diabetes has destroyed your life” to “your life isn’t worth living with diabetes.” Mind you, at this point in time I already had one beautiful son. I pushed the thoughts back as much as I could for his sake. However, in doing so it enabled my thoughts to escalate even further. I was telling myself that my son would be better off without a father. I started looking up those who completed suicide and how they did it. However, even with everything I was feeling, I couldn’t leave my family with the thought that I would do so on purpose. After having crashed my blood sugars numerous times over the years to counteract extreme highs, I decided insulin was my best option.

On a Saturday morning, I woke up in tears and decided that was the day. I got up and took a fatal dose of short acting and went about my morning routine with the idea that at some point, I would have an insulin reaction and go unresponsive. For whatever reason, by an act of God, the insulin took hours to work. Later that day, when I was on line to have lunch, the last thing I remember was reaching for a plate. I woke up surrounded by EMTs in my manager’s office. Lucky for me, the guys I worked with knew me and my diabetes very well. Upon coming to, one of the EMTs said it was the first time he had a patient so low it wouldn’t read on his meter. We still don’t know how low I truly was when they got there. I finally got to the point I could stand on my own and was feeling okay physically. However, my mental state was still in shambles. Per policy at my work, I had to be sent home. I begged with my manager to let me stay. I said “I’ll just sit in the back, no one will know I‘m there.” I couldn’t go home in the state of mind I was in. But none the less, I was on my way home. The short 5 minute drive was nerve racking, tears falling, thinking “should I try again” and “I can’t be alone” and “I don’t want to live.” My best friend was sitting on the couch as I walked into my apartment and he immediately looked up at me, knowing something wasn’t right. He put his arms around me, like any brother should, and gave me a much-needed embrace–the kind of hug that lets you know someone loves you. We ended up going for a long walk where I explained what I did. He was the only one who knew what I did for years. During our walk he said, “I know the greatness you have ahead of you, you just have to be here to find it.” His words have sat with me for years.

With my two children and the Betes Bros, I have a family that pushes me to succeed. Brothers who reach out for my support as well as check on me. The men and women who have come into my life have filled my cup and continue to make life even better. If you are struggling, that is okay. As someone who almost experienced an end to my life, if I had the support then that I do now, I probably wouldn’t have gone that far. If you’re ever in a place like that in your life, talk to someone. Seeking a professional counselor doesn’t make you weak, it actually makes you stronger. Reach out to a friend who may be struggling that you haven’t talked to in a while, let them know you’re there. A simple text, note, message saying, “I’m here if you need me” can literally save a life.

#RealT1DLyfe Chris Pickering Family

Get real with T1D! #RealLyfe

For additional resources on Depression and Diabetes, check out this article from our friends at Diabetes Daily!

Inside the Patient Entrepreneur’s Mind: John Wilcox

Managing a chronic illness is challenging, whether it is your own or a loved one’s. Starting and running a business also poses unique challenges. If you struggle with a chronic illness, have started a business, or want to start a business, this blog series can help guide you. “Inside the Patient Entrepreneur’s Mind” offers key insights into chronic disease and mission-driven entrepreneurship by some of the most innovative patient entrepreneurs in the world. 

John Wilcox is the CEO & Co-Founder of Diatech Diabetic Technologies, Inc. 

As a patient entrepreneur, can you describe your personal experience with diabetes from diagnosis through your current daily management and how this experience drove you to innovate the space? 

In 2005, I was diagnosed on my ninth birthday. I figured the only way to come out on top was to make it a positive experience. Growing up, I really identified with the disease and now use it as an opportunity to empathize with others with chronic disease. I wanted to go to medical school, and still might, but this opportunity came up in college to develop intellectual property—what is SmartFusion today.

I took on the business full-time post college graduation of May 2019. My diagnosis gives me a leg up on how to develop technology to help diabetes patients. As a collective community, we can appreciate when someone with a disease can relate to us and effectively create change. My condition is something that I can share and allows me to connect to people and understand how other people are struggling—it is one of the best gifts that I could ever ask for. I don’t know what I would do with my career without this diagnosis because it has turned into a passion to help others and a lesson on how to make the best of situations.

What makes SmartFusion unique and how does it meet an unmet need of the diabetes community?

SmartFusion is a new infusion set that can more accurately tell you if insulin delivery is actually getting into your body. SmartFusion is unique in the fact that it helps patients understand if they are getting insulin.  Insulin pumps on the market right now are not really meeting the standard of being able to tell patient users if their insulin delivery is effectively working. We noticed the issue of infusion set insulin delivery failures where pumps can have issues with insulin delivery efficacy.

Personally, I have had issues going into DKA because of insulin mis-delivery.  I went to an endocrinologist in college who blamed me for poor A1C control rather than it being a technology/pump failure. I want to provide technology that can deliver alerts before hyperglycemia because it happened to me and it is very dangerous. Fixing this unmet need of pump reliability can take one thing off the list of what patients and caregivers go through regarding issues with diabetes care.

Are there any other unmet needs of the diabetes community that you think take priority in working to address? How are patient entrepreneurs well-suited to meet these needs? 

In the future, I would love to focus on software for pumps. There has been great work on hardware that is safe and effective for patients with diabetes but a real gamechanger could be software that pairs any type of CGM with any type of pump. The diabetes “hacker” community is already pairing their own CGMs with pumps but are not following standards of the industry.

Additionally, there is a lot that needs to be addressed in education, especially how to learn to effectively use diabetes technology for parents of children with the disease.

Where do you draw your inspiration and motivation from to keep forging ahead as an entrepreneur in the healthcare industry?

 My inspiration and motivation comes from talking to people who have the condition. I want to make sure the diabetes community is affected and impacted in a positive way. Stories from patients about issues with diabetes care like insulin mis-delivery keep me up at night.

Lastly, what do you do for fun to manage the stress of running a business as both a person with t1d and an entrepreneur? Do you have any similar advice on work-life-disease management balance to others out there thinking of starting a business to meet an unmet need of a chronic disease patient community?

I love to run whenever I can and I find it a very clearing activity. My goal is to John Wilcox 5k racerun the Boston marathon for the JDRF. In terms of advice for other patient entrepreneurs, we have a disease that can help connect us to other people that have the same chronic illness. However, each patient story is unique so taking the time to recognize that is important. For example, my parents helped me get appropriate care at a young age by providing insurance coverage. How dare I compare my journey to patients I meet now, who are in their twenties, who are still without coverage to get insulin. In a nutshell, know that your story is unique and craft a connection to fellow patients based on that fact.

 

 

New Workout App for People With Diabetes – And Christel is an Instructor!

Have you ever dreamt of working out with a trainer who understands diabetes, who might even live with diabetes, and who gets what it takes to get through a workout without wonky blood sugars?

Well, that trainer could be me!

Today, my 12-week fitness program “STRONGER”, that I developed for GlucoseZone, is available in the GlucoseZone app. I’d like to personally invite you to come train with me. To join me for a program that will push you to be a stronger version of yourself.

Sign up HERE and use the “STRONGER” code to get 30% off your monthly subscription

The beauty of joining GlucoseZone is that you’ll get access to not only my program but to 6 other exercise programs, as well as live workouts, all developed specifically for people living with diabetes. You can do all of the workouts in your own home or bring it to the gym.

Regardless of your fitness level, you can find qualified instructors to take you through the workouts that are right for you, and always with your diabetes in mind.

One of the reasons why I’m so excited about working with GlucoseZone is that it’s the first-ever clinically validated digital exercise therapeutic for people living with diabetes, and it’s endorsed by the American Diabetes Association.

Stronger Getting Started

Sign up HERE and use the “STRONGER” code to get 30% off the monthly retail (You’ll only pay $9.09 per month) when you sign up for the GlucoseZone app.

 

Connect with Christel on Facebook: @DiabetesStrong; Instagram: @diabetesstrong_ig.

Wearing a Diabetes Medical ID On-The-Go!

Medical ID Bracelets

Living life on-the-go can be fun and busy, however, doing so with a chronic illness requires a few extra steps and planning along the way.

 

Hi, my name is David and I have been living with Type 1 Diabetes for 10 years now. I was diagnosed at the age of 11 and let me tell you… I have been through a lot. In living with this disease, I have been able to experience so much and learn from my mistakes. In doing so, I have come to realize that as a diabetic, I am one of those who should wear a medical ID and why it’s important for all life’s experiences.

For years on end, I never wore a medical ID bracelet. I could never find a bracelet that I simply liked or wanted to wear daily. When I became a part of the Diabetic Online Community (DOC) back in 2014, I was exposed to several different people who shared the same struggle. I also saw a variety of amazing brands and companies who understand this struggle and have found ways to make ID bracelets, dog tags, necklaces, and more so much nicer and pleasing to the eye and the patient. I own several different medical ID bracelets, I think when one finds their style with Diabetes, it’s always nice to have options and create your own look, which is why owning multiple forms of emergency ID that go with different looks is a great idea!

I have mentioned several times on my Instagram, @type1livabetic, that when wearing my personalized Paracord bracelet from American Medical ID, I felt so very safe. I felt as though if anything Diabetes related could go wrong, I would be prepared. On my engraved bracelet, my name, condition, and emergency contact information were all located on a small piece of metal, attached to the Paracord bracelet. At a recent trip to Disneyland with a large group of people who also had Type 1 Diabetes that could vouch for me if there were to be an emergency, I still encountered times in which I was alone at the park (walking to and from my car, walking to meet the attendees, or simply stepping to the side to grab a snack), rest assured, I was confident with my Diabetes at the time.

So why is it so important to wear a form of medical alert jewelry for Diabetes? Well, not to get too dark or technical, however, the fact remains that we do have Type 1 Diabetes that does come with some symptoms and consequences. If our blood sugar drops significantly low, we could pass out and become unconscious or go into a coma. Same with high blood sugar, if we are severely high and go into DKA, we could in fact experience some symptoms that could limit our ability to function, which can prevent us from acting in the moment to get help. Say you were in public, alone, and you experienced one of these symptoms, if you were wearing a medical ID, someone nearby would mostly likely come to check for various hints or signs on you if something doesn’t look entirely right and search for an alert jewelry in particular sites on the body: wrists, around the neck, tattoos, etc.

In being diagnosed with any chronic disease and being told you have to take extra care of yourself can be a lot, however, allowing yourself some relief by wearing a form of ID can truly reduce a lot of the stress surrounded by various diseases. One should never leave the house without some form of ID as you never know when these emergencies could happen.

American Medical ID Healthy Packing List

The CDC includes having a form of medical identification such as alert bracelets, necklaces, or wallet cards as part of a healthy travel packing list.

I believe that some may also feel safe in knowing that they have a medical ID card in their wallet as well, for added peace of mind. One should also wear a form of ID at home, just in case. For those who live alone, I understand that it may feel as though you are not in need of wearing an ID at home as you will be alone, but that could just be the very tool that can keep you alive, say you have an emergency, it could be that neighbor walking by and seeing something isn’t right that could barge in and save your life and being able to identify you have a particular medical condition that needs attention.

We each have our own busy lives that takes up so much time and mental focus away from our health, which is why wearing medical alert jewelry can protect us as we are on the move, daily. School, work, the playground, a coffeeshop, wherever you may be, ID is necessary. No matter how old the patient is, whether a child, teen, adult, or elder, wearing a medical ID all the time can protect us from the dangers of our diseases and more.

 

Live well,

David

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