15 Ways to Thrive With Type 1 Diabetes

By: Yerachmiel Altman I achieved 57 years of living with type 1 diabetes this year! I was diagnosed just one month after my 2nd birthday and have logged half a million hours of living with type 1 to this day! I want to share with you the tips and knowledge I’ve acquired through my top 15 tips living and working with diabetes. Hopefully you find these as useful as I have. Remember that everyone has a different way of treating their disease so don’t worry if some of these tips don’t apply to you!

1. Put your mind into it.

If you focus on what’s important to your health, it opens up wider possibilities than thought before.

2. Don’t judge yourself

3. Don’t compare yourself to others.

4. Its not your fault.

You didn’t choose to have diabetes, it chose you!

5. Make smart choices everyday

Diabetes self-care is all about choices. Human minds create over 35,000 choices about every five seconds.

6. Don’t wait for the cure.

Ever have someone talk about the “cure in five years” ? Do your best to control diabetes to best of your ability.  Monitoring your diabetes will only lead to better health and a longer, happier life with hopefully less complications. This will help to leave you in improved conditions to be eligible for breakthrough treatments when they ARE available.

7. No your way or the highway thinking.

Don’t think the way you are doing it is the best or only way.  Always read, research and try (under medical supervision) different ways of treatment, wellness, and care. Listen to those around you.

8. Know thyself and thy diet.

Always learn as much as possible about your own self.  Everyone has certain foods that for themselves don’t follow the standard “curve” (and/or standard “carb count”).

9. Find your niche and your system.

Each person has to find the system or methods that work best for them.

10. Get Techy

Technology has given us many many modern inventions which aid in our control and understanding of diabetes – you have determine which of them works best for you and which ones aren’t as helpful.

11. Find a mentor. Find a community.

Vitally important to have others who are type 1 and similar in length and type of diabetes as well as and other life factors.  It is also important to have a “mentor”; someone else to ask questions of.  Having another person to ask or to bounce ideas off of can many times resolve issues before they become problems.  Additionally long term use of equipment gets us into habits  –  having others to ask may open doors we didn’t even know existed.

12. Pay it forward: spread your knowledge to others!

It is very important once one has learned enough to help others.  It is both really helpful for the other people AND very good for yourself.

13. Surround yourself with love

Always have family and friends who lift you up, and help guide you through the tough times that come with being a T1D patient. There is always hope!

14. Open up

Diabetes doesn’t have to be a secret, share with others about your disease. Sometimes it can be hard to talk about your chronic illness but with more awareness comes more acceptance. However you always know how much is safe or okay to disclose,you are never obligated to tell people or only focus on your disease. You’re a multidimensional person!

15. Enjoy Life!! You CAN live a joyous and fulfilling life with diabetes!

Top Five Wellness Tips We Learned From Lauren Bongiorno!

At Lyfebulb, we’re SO lucky to have Lauren Bongiorno on our T1D Lyfebulb Ambassador Team! Her expertise in countless areas related to self empowerment, fitness, nutrition and health is what makes her such a great influencer. We can all learn a thing or two from Lauren’s expertise!

Today we’re highlighting some of Lauren’s best wellness tips from  IG to share with you today. Her advice is relatable to everyone living with a chronic illness, T1D patients, or  even those interested in creating a well-balanced life.

Check her out at LaurenBongiorno.com !

TIP 1: PENCIL IN VACATION WORKOUT SESSIONS TO KEEP BALANCED

TIP 2: ENJOY YOUR VACATION: DON’T THINK ABOUT “EARNING YOUR MEAL”

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HERE’S THE TRUTH: I aways work out on vacation so I can be less strict about what I eat. yeeeeeppppp. For me it’s not about burning calories/ earning my meal, but with being able to eat waffles, risotto, pizza, tropical fruit, truffle fries without my blood sugars roller coastering all over the place. Sure it would be easier to cook all my meals in the room or only order fish and vegetables out, but i want the freedom to indulge if that’s what I want. For someone like me with #typeonediabetes, if i’m not working out, eating these foods would spike my blood sugar real fast and it would take hours to get it down. When this happens I feel so tired, moody, killer headache… not fun. I feel 10000x better strategically structuring my workouts to support a little more flexibility on vacation. Also, I had 2 waffles for breakfast, pancakes, eggs, + a croissant and it was 💯. The end.

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TIP 3: PRIORITIZE YOUR HEALTH AND WELLBEING!

TIP 4: BE PRESENT IN THE MOMENT, YOUR BODY, AND LIFE

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part 1/3. New Year Intentions. I should have had multiple burn outs. I’m actually shocked at how all over the place I was last year. I know the only reason I was able to keep moving forward was because I prioritized my health( sleep, food, blood sugars). I heard once that busy isn’t a badge of honor. Couldn’t agree more. December was actually my best, most enjoyable month of the year. I told my best friend Alex it was my month of “yin”, which meant only dedicating time to the things that were absolutely essential, not overextending myself. Towards the end of the month I was so sad it was ending because I felt SO good. But then i realized oh wait i can do this all the time hahah. So that’s what i’m doing. My word of 2019: ESSENTIALISM. My guiding statement: “stay in relationship with what matters.”. Sign: 333 (the number I frequently see which I will use to remind me to trust that i’m on the right path). 2019, we in it. What did you guys set as your intentions? More excited for the next 12 months than I’ve ever been before. Can’t wait to throw these up on a vision board. #yearoftheessentialist

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TIP 5: STICK TO A DAILY ROUTINE

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part 2/3: My 6 new years daily habits💫 Its cool to set intentions in whatever way you’ll feel most successful! For me i’m a lover of checking boxes off + getting real specific. So last week i took some time to map out my 2019 daily habits: 1. Movement: yoga, hiit circuits, weights, pilates, walking. My WHY: blood sugars are best, mood is happy, love a challenge. 2. Tackle the big rocks before 12pm: the things on my to do list that are the most difficult. MY WHY: i have most energy and focus in morning hours. Want to sync up more with sunrise and sunset energy. 3. Be present through listen + feel. MY WHY: i sometimes find myself guessing where convo is going or rushing it to be doing something else. I want to feel a greater sense of connection and appreciation, treating every convo as sacred. 4. Lateral thinking exercise: solve a brain teaser or write down 10 ideas. MY WHY: get outside my box and limitations of habitual thinking patterns. See what blossoms. 5. Study outside my industry of health: book, podcast, documentary, the Economist, become more proficient in SPANISH! MY WHY: expand my knowledge into different areas. 6. Align + Manifest- journaling, card pull, visualization, or meditation. MY WHY: we attract the level at which we vibrate at. Excited for all these! My daily routines were getting a bit stale. What things are you looking to make into habits this year? #newyear #growthmindset

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Real Talk With Dave- HOW TO: THE NEED TO KNOW ON NEEDLES

 QUESTION FOR FELLOW DIABETICS : HOW DO YOU DISPOSE OF YOUR USED NEEDLES?

            This is one of THE MOST asked questions those of us with Diabetes often face.

 MY JOURNEY TO SAFETY:

When I first got diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes back in 2008, I vividly remember how unaware I was on the topic of safe needle disposal. I didn’t know of the harmful effects of throwing away used needles right into the trash.

Fast forward to one year after my diagnosis, I setup my very first pump at the age of 12! This opened up a whole new world that I never experienced before.

It can be pretty daunting when you’re 12 years old. I learned a whole encyclopedia’s worth of experiences. I learned everything from putting on my pump to how to wear it and even how to actually use it!  I’d like to share with you my top tips for disposing needles safely.

My journey to safety was NOT an easy one! I had lots of trash that needed to be thrown away. A used needle and inserter were among that pile of trash, so without the knowledge I needed, I threw away my used needles in the trash!!!

MY TOP TIPS ON HOW TO DISPOSE NEEDLES SAFELY:

  1. DO NOT THROW USED NEEDLES AND INSERTERS IN TRASH

  2. ENLIST A PUMP TRAINER

    • When I began my new world as a T1D, I constantly threw away my used needles in the trash. My pump trainer quickly caught me in the act of throwing the needles away unsafely and showed me how to break my long-term habit!

 

  1. HAVE ACCESS TO A SHARPS CONTAINER:

    • Unused needles go in a sharps container as well as used syringes, lancets, and any other form of needles.

Today, this is something that I am very passionate about. After  educating myself on the dangers of disposing used needles the wrong way, I made it my goal to always have a sharps container in sight. Whether I am at home following a set routing or creating temporary plans for traveling-I always make sure to dispose safely!

 

  1. LOCATE A SHARPS DISPOSAL ANYWHERE YOU ARE WITH SAFENEEDLEDISPOSAL.ORG

  • I partnered with SafeNeedleDisposal.org to bring awareness on this very important topic. This website allows you to search for drop off locations in your area by zip code and teaches you how to safely store your used needles at home! Some areas even allow disposal in your household trash bin if placed in the proper container. I find that education is so very important since many may not be fully aware of the potential dangers in disposing their needles unsafely. As SafeNeedleDisposal.org states, the bottom line is that safety is the point.

HOW TO USE SAFENEEDLEDISPOSAL.ORG:

  1. LOCATE DROP-OFF LOCATION:
    • Use the site to locate the appropriate drop-off location in your area is so vital and so very convenient.
  2. STORE UP USED NEEDLES:
    • Store up all your used needles for a few months.
  3. DESIGNATE A REGULAR DISPOSAL DAY:
    • Designate a certain day to go out and dispose of your needles at your local drop-off location. You are not only bettering the environment, but your own health and safety as well.

 Let’s be honest ,as Diabetics, we go through lots of needles, daily, weekly, monthly, and so on. Unfortunately, there is no cure for Diabetes yet, so we must insert pump sites, CGM sites, inject Insulin, and prick our fingers daily! Basically, we go through LOTS of needles and they need to go SOMEWHERE at the end of the day. By having designated areas and a great website to help us find those locations, it becomes a great way to dispose of needles both safely and efficiently.

Bottom line, safety is the point.

Live well,

Dave

Poached Pears With Whipped Cream Recipe

POACHED PEARS WITH WHIPPED CREAM

poached pear

An original recipe  from Lyfebulb CEO Dr. Karin Hehenberger, MD, PhD

Interested in more delicious auto-immune diet friendly recipes! Click the link  to learn more about “The Everything You Need to Know About Diabetes Cookbook: Expert advice, plus 70 recipes complete with nutritional breakdowns.”
Pears are delicious, particularly in the fall and winter, and can easily be found in most food markets. This dessert is healthy and looks so yummy.

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups (350 ml) red wine
Juice of 1 lemon
1/2 teaspoon stevia
1/2 vanilla bean(pod) split in half lengthwise and seeds scraped out or 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cinnamon stick
5 cloves
1 orange, quartered
4 small ripe pears, peeled
Scant 1/2 cup (100ml)
whipping cream,
whipped, to serve
Serves 4

Instructions

1. In a saucepan large enough to hold the pears snugly, pour in the wine and lemon juice, then add the stevia, vanilla seeds or extract, cinnamon, and cloves, Squeeze the juice from the orange quarts into the saucepan, then add one of the squeezed orange quarters to the saucepan and discard the remainder. Finally, add the pears.
2. Set the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 25 minutes, turning the pears occasionally, until they’re easily pierced with the tip of a knife. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pears to individual plates.
3. Pour the poaching liquid through a strainer set over a bowl and discard the orange quarter and spices.  Return the poaching liquid to the saucepan, bring to a simmer, and cook for about 15 minutes, or until the poaching liquid is syrupy and reduced by two-thirds.  Let cool a little( you don’t want the syrup to melt the whipped cream).
4. Spoon the syrup over the pears and serve with the whipped cream.
Per serving: 239 kcals, 10.3 g fat (6.3 g saturates), 16.9 g carbohydrate (16.7 sugars), 1.3 G protein, 3.6 g fiber, trace salt

Enjoy!

Real Talk with Dave: All about the Dexcom G6

Many people have been eagerly waiting for the Dexcom G6 to be announced.

Well, it just so happens that it is now FDA approved and available in June. I had the special privilege of being sent a Dexcom G6 to try out and so far, I am loving it. As promised, I wanted to share my open and honest opinion about this device, so I thought what better way to share my thoughts than through a blog.

First and foremost, I want to say how incredible this device is. I had the opportunity to see a mock-up of the device at the JDRF Type One Nation Summit and was even more excited to use this new product! The whole site and transmitter is about 33% thinner than the Dexcom G5. It is much more user friendly and has a longer wear time than the G5. You can now wear your site and get continuous glucose readings for 10 full days before you have to change out your site. You can also view your blood sugar readings on your phone, watch, and receiver that comes with the device.

One really exciting feature is that the Dexcom G6 does not require any fingerstick calibrations, which means you no longer have to prick your fingers for a manual blood sugar check anymore. You can now fully depend on this device to be even more accurate than before and allow you to have even more freedom in knowing what your blood sugars are. I have been wearing the Dexcom G6 for about a week now and have been comparing the G6 to the G5. For the first few days, I was wearing both CGMs just out of curiosity on how much more accurate the G6 really is. From what I observed, the G6 was way more accurate in comparison to the G5. I also would still check my blood sugars manually just to compare the numbers and my Dexcom was very close to the actual reading. It is intended to be 20 points above or below the actual reading, which it has been.

The device also has a new app in which there is a whole new design (similar to that of the G5, only better), and there are now more options for alerts and settings in which you can customize to your liking. Now, when having a low blood sugar, this device will alert you 20 minutes before a predicted severe low of 55 mg/dL, which I think is amazing that it can detect that for you. It truly does give peace of mind in knowing what to expect and when, giving you alerts ahead of time so you can try and prevent a bad low before it hits you.

The part of this device that I cannot praise enough is the insertion. Before, you would have to plunge a big needle into your skin and then remove it, leaving a plastic cannula deep into your skin. Now, all you do is apply to device to your skin, push a button, and within seconds, the device is in your body! When people ask me what it feels like to insert the G6, I like to describe it as “a puff of air hitting your skin, that’s it!”. The first (and only) time I inserted my CGM, I was blown away at how painless it truly was. This is going to be a huge game changer for children who have to wear a CGM as they will not feel a thing when the time comes to insert the device into their skin.

All in all, this device is great. I am obsessed at how this product works and helps me feel as a Type 1 Diabetic. It definitely allows me to live my life and not worry as much as I truly can trust what my readings are and know what is going on inside of my body. If medical technology is this good now, I am even more excited as to what the future holds for Type 1 Diabetes. With the Dexcom G6, Diabetes is not all bad.

Live well,

Dave

Real Talk with Dave: All About the JDRF Type One Nation Summit

Last Sunday, April 22, 2018, I had the amazing opportunity to volunteer at my very first Type 1 event. JDRF hosted their annual Type One Nation Summit in Pasadena as part of the Los Angeles chapter. My goal for this year has been to get more involved in the Diabetic community, so I just knew that I had to reach out and see if I could be a part of this amazing event! I was given the privilege to work with children who also have Type 1 Diabetes, which was such a surreal and eye-opening experience. Also, throughout the day, I was able to meet many new and amazing Diabetics, many of whom I have met through the online community and now was able to meet them in person.

As the day started, I was greeted by some very kind people working the event who helped get me situated and allowed me to find my way around the place. As I walked through the convention center, many different Type 1 brands and companies were there with their very own booths, which allowed us T1Ds to get some more knowledge and have our questions answered. Brands such as Dexcom, Medtronic, OmniPod, Myabetic, and so many others were there with a few very kind reps from each brand. They were all so nice in welcoming quests and helping them find their new favorite T1D brand. I for one was fascinated by the Dexcom booth as they were promoting their latest and greatest device, the Dexcom G6. It was so neat to be able to see the product right then and there as the Dexcom reps were there showing how it works.

As I went to help the children who lived with T1D, I found myself in a room of so many wonderful kids. You would think that these kids would be somewhat down for the fact that they have to live with T1D, but that wasn’t the case at all. The kids I worked with were so happy to be at the event and meet new friends. I would ask them different questions such as how long they have had Type 1 for, what their blood sugars were (and we would compare our numbers with each other), and what devices they use. There was an instant connection with many of the kids as they were so responsive and excited to share. The day went by and they were thrilled to be in this space with each other as they worked on different projects and had different guests come in and talk with them.

Throughout the event, I would go back and forth from the T1D kids to the T1D adults and found myself fascinated with each and every special bond that was formed with one another. I was able to attend a few break-out sessions and listen in on some very interesting panels, some of which I was familiar with the speakers, which made them much more interesting and enjoyable. I must say that whoever put together this event really knew what Diabetes is actually like as they thought of everything to be presented that day. The topics that they talked about were so relatable to people living with Type 1, which made it so special to be a part of. We even got to meet a T1D hero who has been living with Type 1 for 58 years! He was such an inspiration.

As the day went by, more friendships were formed, more amazing T1D brands were discovered with some amazing purposes in the Diabetic community, and all in all, this event was a beautiful space where we could all come together as one big T1D family. Whoever was there was in support of one another and would lift each other up. New people came, but were immediately invited into the group and fit in right away. Many traveled from near and far to be together on this special day for this extra special event, and that right there made me realize how when we stick together as one big T1D family, this disease has nothing on us. We are brave, strong, and true fighters, we won’t give up and we will rise above in times of trouble. Diabetes doesn’t own us.

If you want to get more involved with the T1D community (which I highly recommend, it will definitely change your life for the better), get in contact with your local T1D organizations and be on the lookout for events/meet-ups in your area and just go for it! It just takes one time to get involved and you will be hooked! Being with other Diabetics is contagious and you will want to meet even more Diabetics each time!

 

Live well,

 

Dave

THE MORNING SUGAR: A Window into your Type One Management

I lie in bed with one eye open, ears still ringing from my poorly selected, overplayed alarm tone. I sit half hunched over my glucose monitor attempting the first blood-drop-to-test-strip co-ordination of the day. Its 05h30, I have fasted for 6 to 8 hours, it’s time to dive into diabetes. My test strip sucks up the drop of blood and counts down to my first glucose reading of the day:

BEEP: 4.6mmol/l (84)

OR

BEEP: 9.6mmol/l (173)

OR

BEEP 16.6mmol/l (299)

The good, the average and the ugly.
These are the 3 general ranges of readings that might greet me at the first finger prick of the day. It’s only one of the many sugar readings that lie ahead, but it is a special one to pay attention to, as your morning glucose reading can provide important insight into your diabetes control.

A fasted reading has a myriad of information which you can choose to ignore, or preferably dissect and investigate for optimum diabetes control. I believe it is vital to ask myself why? Why is my blood glucose this level and what were my preceding actions?

I will take you through my 3 ranges and my general approach to morning sugar readings and how I personally troubleshoot these readings. We each tackle diabetes differently, but hopefully the following brings some insight into your morning sugars or encourages you think critically of those interesting rise and shine numbers!

The “Gem”
My personal values are 3.8-5.6mmol/l

Oh this is a sweet, gem of a reading. It’s the real “roll out of bed on the right side” number.
Perfectly in range, it is still important to acknowledge the formula that achieved this number. We could all do with a little positive reinforcement and mindfully recognize and enjoy our diabetes successes! I always ask myself, “What did I do well?”

This sugar reading generally informs me that I have correctly dosed my long acting insulin as it did not bring me into the clutch of hypoglycaemia when fasting during my sleep. It was also sufficient to meet the cascade of morning hormones such as cortisol and hyperglycaemia it brings along with it. This sugar happily greets me when I don’t snack after dinner and I eat around 3 hours before bed-time. This plan allows for an honest, stable blood sugar reading before bed where my injected insulin has already peaked in activity, and I can expect predictable glucose readings as I sleep.

The “Meh”
My personal values are 6-9mmol/l

It’s a sugar range that is higher than I would like for a fasting blood glucose level, but it’s not remotely the end of the world. To solve this morning glucose and to prevent it creeping higher, I have my insulin dosage for my breakfast plus a dash more insulin to correct. I wait 20-30 minutes for my insulin to start working and bring my glucose down before having my breakfast. I ask my “why?” and make a mental note of how I could improve and act accordingly. If went to bed with a great blood glucose level and I woke up high, it could be various things:

1. Insufficient long-acting insulin: The Dawn phenomenon

When I have my continuous glucose monitor (CGM), the Dexcom, attached, this will be displayed as a nice steady graph with readings in glucose range for the first 2/3rds of sleep, only to find in the few hours before waking my blood glucose slowly and steadily increases. This is due to the get-up-and-go hormones that pump through your body to prepare you for waking and tackling the day. These sneaky buggers include growth hormones, cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine and they increase your insulin resistance, causing blood sugar to rise.

2. Too much insulin: The Somogyi effect

This is an interesting stress response of your body, a rebound effect of low blood glucose while sleeping. If you have too much insulin, long acting or short acting, and you experience a low while sleeping your body mounts a survival response and encourages your body to release sugar back into your blood via adrenaline and cortisol. This low may not be rapid or severe enough to cause a seizure, but sufficient to mount a physiological survival response from your body.

3. Not enough short-acting insulin

This is usually prompted by snacking before bed and eating late. My stomach is still full and has not emptied. My blood sugar will be in range when I get to sleep, but as my tummy works to digest my food, sugar trickles into my blood which I thought I had sufficiently covered by my short-acting. This especially occurs if I eat meals that have a carbohydrate, protein and high fat content. It has even been dubbed “The Pizza Effect”, where fats and protein delay the absorption of carbohydrates from a meal. The most challenging part is that you don’t know when the carbohydrates are going to be dumped into your bloodstream as sugar. It could be more than 5 hours until you feel the true effect of your meal. This could also be a reason for a really high morning blood glucose reading, the one where you would rather turn over and head back to sleep, which brings me to my final morning range, which I like to call the “Lie in Bed for a Few Minutes in Denial”.

The “Lie in Bed for a Few Minutes in Denial”
My personal values are anything double digit

The “Man, I messed up” feels. I most likely did not give myself enough insulin for the previous night’s meal, or I ate complete rubbish, did a massive carbohydrate count guestimate (that’s right folks- guess and estimate can really be combined into one perfect word), it could be “the pizza effect”, or I forgot my long acting insulin.

The alternative explanation is that I woke up with low in the middle of the night and quite passionately, dove into my bedside glucose stash, bathed myself in sugar before falling back asleep in a pile a sweet wrappers. (Yes, I have awoken with gummy sweets melted into my back and bed sheet).

If my sugars are really bad in the morning, there is usually a pretty grand, blatantly obvious reason as to why they are absolutely deranged. I find myself glancing in the mirror, at my poor, hard-done-by face to ask myself why? My expression smirks, “Oh girl, you know why. You know.”

This is where the power of the mind can transform your day. You can switch to victim. You can choose guilt and actively bring yourself down. You can choose to let a number on a plastic monitor define your day or you can free yourself from mental binds, for you are capable, you are strong and you are going to tackle the day.

My go-to plan of action:

1. Massive bottle of water with loads of top ups
2. Small simple, low sugar breakfast (I find waiting for my sugars to come down before eating leaves me more frantic and stressed)
3. More water
4. Add Insulin
Tip: Don’t give yourself 70000 units because you are panicking and desperately want your sugar to go down as quickly as possible (TRACY SANDERS I am talking to you girl). A resultant severe hypoglycaemia does not make it easier to improve the day.
5. Forgive yourself, give thanks to your body for all the other goodness it brings to you and power forward.

Transform your WHY’s into WISE, pay attention to each nugget of information your body and glucometer communicates to you. By building up an understanding of your sugars, you build a stronger relationship with your body and mind. Work closely with your support network, endocrinologist and diabetes educator to make the correct adjustments to suite your body, always ask questions and challenge your knowledge and experience of type one.

Real Talk with Dave: How to Stay Positive with T1D (Dealing with Burnout)

Have you ever felt overwhelmed with Type 1 Diabetes to the point where you just don’t want to deal with it anymore? You may feel the need to cope with your Diabetes in a different way. Many will go off their Insulin pump for a while and go back to daily syringes/ pen injections as a way to feel a sense of freedom from this disease. Unfortunately, us Diabetics cannot just “stop” Diabetes. We have to fight daily in order to stay alive. We have to take Insulin in different moments throughout the day and watch our blood sugars fluctuate from stubborn highs to difficult lows. At some point, we all go through a burnout phase where T1D just doesn’t feel bearable anymore, that is why I have put together a little guide as to how you can stand up to the burnout phase and keep on pushing through!

1/ Keep a positive mindset – This seems easier said than done, but trust me, in order to feel a positive presence on you as you go about your day, every morning, start the day fresh and new and remind yourself of all your accomplishments in life and how far you have come. Always let yourself know who you are and how brave and strong you are.

2/ Self-talk – Every day is different and some days (as we all know) can be very bad in terms of our Diabetes. There is a lot to think about throughout our day, things such as what our blood sugars may be, what supplies we need to have with us as we go somewhere during the day, and also planning for emergencies, that being said, we must make room for thoughts of reassurance. We need to talk ourselves through a bad low and tell ourselves that everything will be okay, just like it always is. We need to be our own friend who will be there when no one else is. Having positive and calm self-talk is a good way to walk you through your day and be your own hero.

3/ Do what makes you feel alive – we all face Diabetes every moment of everyday, and it can almost feel as though everything is about Diabetes. Sometimes, we may not want to think about Diabetes all the time (within reason), that is why we need to make time for other things in life that bring us true joy and help take our minds off of T1D for a bit. Doing something you love, such as going out with friends, playing a sport, or spending time with family can be the very thing that can help you cope with T1D burnout.

4/ Take a pump holiday – Though it may be difficult to keep your blood sugars in your normal range, taking a break from wearing your Insulin pump (if you wear one) can make you feel free and have one less thing constantly reminding you of your Diabetes. You can do this for a day, a week, or even a whole month, it’s really up to you. However long you need to take a break from wearing your pump, go for it, because what some don’t realize is that wearing a pump can change a person and mess with their emotions (in some cases) to the point where they feel “different”, which isn’t that case at all. Wearing a pump is a blessing and is what essentially keeps us alive each and every day.

5/ Accept your struggle – Just know that eventually, this T1D burnout phase you may be going through will go away and you will be able to get back in the game. Remember, we ALL face burnout periods in our life, but guess what? We all get over them eventually. Accepting the fact that you are stressed out, annoyed, and tired of T1D is sometimes what we need to get over that phase. Sometimes, just feeling the sadness you are going through is important and perfectly okay, because when you feel it, you work through it. It’s all one big learning process on how to cope with your thoughts and emotions. At the end of the day, we’re all humans. Diabetic or not, we go through tough life situations and working through them is just one way to grow as a person and be able to allow for empathy towards others going through difficult life situations.

6/ You are not alone – When you feel like all things are going wrong with your Diabetes, a great way to vent off and work through it all is turning to the amazing T1D community that is out there, waiting to help out in any way. Connecting with others (in person or online via social media) can help you as you will soon realize that you are not the only one dealing with burnout at the moment and that you can fight T1D together. This has been especially helpful to me as I was in a dark place for a while until I turned to the community for help and support. Now, I am at the happiest place I have ever been with my Diabetes and I realized that T1D is not all that bad.

7/ Live your life! – I get it, T1D is a horrible disease. But just remember, you are bigger, better, and stronger than T1D. Remember to smile through it all, laugh daily, and be kind to others. Make life how you want and always choose to stay actively positive, because when you are positive, whether you’re high or low, you will have motivation and strength to keep on going and T1D will just be one of those things in life we end up getting used to. When we feel like we’ve mastered T1D, we’ll be able to accept what’s on our plate at the moment.

I truly hope these tips and tricks on how to cope with T1D burnout helped you out if you are feeling this at the moment. It’s okay to be frustrated at times, but be sure to never stay in that phase forever. Life is too short to stay in a bad place with your Diabetes.

Live well,

Dave

Moving for Your Body

Let’s be real, working out can suck. Like really, really suck.


Growing up, running was always my punishment for the other sports I played (tennis, volleyball, and softball). We would run if we missed, run if we lost, etc. Running was never something I got to do, but had to do, rather. I’d had a distorted view of working out (outside of playing sports competitively) and I saw working out as punishment for what I ate, etc.

By pushing my body too hard, at the age of 21, I’ve already had shoulder surgery, five stress fractures in both my shins and lumbar spine, as well as four cortisone injections. So after years of putting my body through intense workouts to train, I am finally working out to heal my body and mind.

So what shifted in my love-hate relationship with “movement”? My mindset. While I used to view running, cycling, swimming as the enemy or the “worst part” of training, I now view it as something I GET to do. I get to move my body, as quickly or slowly as I please. I get to be outside. I get an hour to move how I want to– however feels good for my body. 

I used to push myself through a run when I could hardly walk, or through shin splints on a long run, now I don’t. Now, I run or bike when I want, put on a great playlist, and enjoy the movement, the celebration of what my body CAN do. I practice yoga daily because it is sustainable for me, and I love the mental and physical reset it provides for me. I focus on how it feels, what I need, and am very consious of my blood glucose levels when working out.

My advice to those who have a distorted view of gyms or physical activity, or even just need motivation to start working out is to find something you love, that you can sustain. Maybe for you this is dance, yoga, boxing, a long walk– or a multitude of act ivies combined.

“Speak like you love yourself. Eat like you love yourself. Move like you love yourself.”

Real Talk with Dave: Trusting Your Gut

When first diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes, we are told how we will feel. Doctors and nurses come in and tell us what we may experience when we are faced with a low or a high blood sugar, but that’s about it. Mind you most of these medical professionals are NOT Diabetic, which means that they don’t truly know what Diabetes “feels” like. Not only are we not able to fully know what symptoms of T1D feel like until we experience them on our own, but we are never actually mentally prepared for how life is going to feel like from now on, from the good times, to the not so good moments. How we know how Diabetes is exactly like is by simply living with it and experiencing all the possible situations on our own time.

For example, in the hospital, a doctor would typically educate you on low and high symptoms (shakiness, headache, fast heartbeat, etc.), but that doctor doesn’t actually know what it genuinely feels like. When we are faced with our first low blood sugar as a Type 1 Diabetic, it can be a real shocker in the sense that we are not expecting it to feel the way it actually does.

I can remember my very first low when I was essentially “on my own”. I had just gone back to school (6th grade) two weeks after being diagnosed and hadn’t fully understood how important carbohydrates were when on Insulin. I went to lunch that day and didn’t like the bread on the sandwich I was eating, so I decided to not eat the bread and eat the protein inside the sandwich instead, as I thought I was being healthy. Of course, shortly after lunch and having not eaten the carbs I took Insulin for, I had a very bad low. The sweats, shaking, and fast heart beat were so prominent in that low of mine and I needed a friend to walk me to the nurse’s office, where I was given some apple juice to quickly bring my sugar levels back up. Scary, I know, but that was necessary as I then learned why this happened and how to prevent it from happening again.

Trusting your gut is key in living with T1D. You may have just checked your blood sugar minutes before and had a good number. Minutes later, you feel a bit funny but don’t think you could have gone low (or high) in such a short amount of time, but then, you do. You listen to your gut and trust your feelings and, you guessed it, a low. Had you not trusted your own gut, you could have been in for a really bad experience. This can happen in a variety of different situations as a Type 1 Diabetic. You can feel low symptoms when you are actually just fine. You can feel as though your blood sugar is high, when actually, you’re low. Knowing your body and how you feel when certain situations arise can be the thing that saves your life.

Nowadays, we have Continuous Glucose Monitors (CGMs) that tell us what our blood sugars are and where they’re headed, which can give us peace of mind as we go about our day, but can also create anxiety as we can see when we may be going severely low or high at a bad time (work, school, meetings, etc.). Though we can see our blood sugar readings being updated every few minutes, we should not rely on the level of accuracy 100% of the time. Often times, the readings on our CGMs can be way off. That is why we must trust our gut and know our bodies. Every now and then, I may find my CGM readings to be about 100 points off of what my actual blood sugar is, which is extremely dangerous. That just comes to show, always be the one in control of your body and your feelings. You can only depend on yourself to determine how you are truly feeling, and when you do, there is a level of peace in knowing that you were able to catch a bad Diabetic feeling before it caused an emergency.

 So always remember, YOU are in control of how you feel. Not your CGM, not your Doctor, but you.

Live well,

 

Dave

Real Talk With Dave: The Importance of Wearing a Medical ID

Wearing a form of medical ID can be the factor that can potentially save your life. As a Type 1 Diabetic, it is important that we wear some type of medical ID at all times (especially when out alone in public). When we go out into the world and live our lives, we may often times face situations that we might not have control over. Thankfully, we have devices to hopefully help us be in the know at all times with our Diabetes, such as a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), but still, at times, we may experience severe situations with our blood sugars that may result in an emergency.

Without getting too deep into a dark topic (as I am sure we all already know about), I do have to say, there is always a danger, regardless, when it comes to Diabetes. Let’s be real, T1D is considered a “disease” which does have some pretty serious consequences such as really high blood sugars (ending up in DKA) or severe low blood sugars to the point where we may pass out or go into a coma. These are fears none of us want to think about, but somehow, they’re always on our minds. Fear. Something that takes over when diagnosed with T1D. There is nothing to worry about though! We are all on top of our Diabetes and know all the potential risk factors, we just have to be aware and plan ahead.

Where does the role of medical ID come in? Well, say we do experience a medical emergency, if we are alone but are wearing some form of medical ID, such as a bracelet, necklace, ring, tattoo, or ever a simple wallet card, that will help the general public/paramedics know what may have caused the emergency and they can help out as much as possible in saving our lives as they will know what actions they need to take, as essentially, time is everything in an emergency.

I guess you could say that medical ID is more for someone to be able to reference in the case of an emergency. Either way, it will give you the assurance and peace of mind in knowing that you will be taken care of properly in the case of an emergency.

I know that you may not want to wear a medical ID all the time, as it may make you feel “labeled” as a Diabetic, and trust me, I have felt that way at some point in my life, however, so many amazing brands have created casual and modern medical ID jewelry that can go with just about anything on any day. You have to find what your style is and what you feel most comfortable wearing. Once you do so, you will be able to wear your ID wherever you go, feeling confident and safe all the time!

Live your life and don’t let T1D slow you down one bit! All you have to do is take a few simple steps towards your safety as a Diabetic and you will be good to go!

Live well,

 

Dave

 

 

 

Real Talk With Dave: Appreciate the Ordinary Days

When living with Diabetes, there really aren’t any “ordinary” days. Every day, regardless of what goes on, has some type of situation. You could have perfect blood sugars all day, but you may have to change out your pump site. You could have a day where you are still within your weeklong range of wearing your Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) and don’t have to put in a new site, but be struggling with constant high blood sugars. My point is, no day goes by with T1D in which everything is just “perfect”. However, even though Diabetes doesn’t seem fair all the time, we can still experience several really good days.

When I sit down and think of what an ordinary Diabetes day looks like, I immediately think of how that consists of sticking to a relaxed daily routine. We all have them, but some days, those routines can change quite drastically and you may have to skip out on some tasks you always do. However, an ordinary day with T1D can simply be waking up every day feeling the same and knowing how your blood sugars typically will be in the morning, given that some mornings may be so off to the point where you really don’t know what went wrong, I mean after all, this is Diabetes we’re talking about, things happen, unexpectedly.

Another “ordinary” Diabetes day consists of having a stress-free day (weekends, holidays, etc.), pretty much any day that you have off from work and school, in all honesty. I have to admit, I almost enjoy having to go to school and work as it puts my Diabetes on a schedule (meals, snacks, basal rates, etc.), but I do appreciate a day off where I don’t have to constantly think of the fear of going low or high when I’m away from home.

For some reason, home is always a safe place in my mind in terms of Diabetes. When I go low or high, I would much rather experience it at home, just as a form of comfort and safety, some may disagree, but we all have our own individual preferences, and that’s okay! Any possible way to avoid stress on your mind and body will also help and benefit you and your Diabetes as stress plays a huge role on blood sugar management. Another way to feel like your Diabetes is going just great is when you have what you need and normally have with you on hand, such as your favorite low treatment solution or adhesive for your sites, allowing you to move forward with your Diabetes and own it, just the way you are used to. If some things are off and you don’t have the necessities you need, you can create a problem, which can put you in a difficult place with your Diabetes and could even cause an emergency.

To sum up, I appreciate a day where I am familiar with my Diabetes and its very unique patterns.  I like having days in which I am used to and know what is going on with my health. I can trust my Diabetes and feel confident in almost knowing what to expect and when to expect it. I think that goes for every Type 1 Diabetic. We like having days in which we have little to no worry in managing our Diabetes as we feel as though we’ve got it all under control. This doesn’t mean every now and then we have perfect days, no day is perfect, Diabetic or not. I stress the fact of appreciating ordinary days and we don’t get them always, but when we do, it’s a victory to celebrate. Non-Diabetics should understand this, as we go through so much with our Diabetes daily, that some days are just horrible. Highs, lows, fears, you name it! When we do have a successful day with our T1D, we’re going to show it!

Don’t stress, the more days in which you are comfortable with and the days that allow you to appreciate life and the blessings of Diabetes, the better!

 

Live well,

 

David

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