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PB&T Chocolate Pudding

If you live on the East Coast, chances are you are recovering from a snow day this morning. For us, there is no better time than a snow day to try out a new recipe! Besides, if you are going to stay in and cuddle up on the couch, why not make something sweet and healthy to indulge in?

Check out this recipe for my PB&T Chocolate Pudding, straight from “The Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Cookbook!” The book features 70 healthy and delicious recipes to help you control your diabetes and weight loss, and I also help you navigate the key challenges of living with diabetes. Buy it here now!

Silken tofu gives this pudding body, and it adds protein too. Don’t worry, the addition of the cocoa powder and peanut butter means that no one will know you snuck in the tofu.

1 lb (450 g) silken tofu
1/3 cup (30 g) unsweetened cocoa powder
¼ cup (60 ml) maple syrup or agave nectar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
3 tablespoons peanut butter

Serves 4–6 

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a food processor or blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Pour the pudding mixture into mini cups or bowls and enjoy.

Per serving (if serves 6): 216 kcals, 12.5 g fat (3.3 g saturates), 15.9 g carbohydrate (11.2 g sugars), 10.2 g protein, 2 g fiber, 0.2 g salt


Recipe from The Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Cookbook by Dr. Karin M Hehenberger, MD, PhD (CICO Books, $19.95) Photography © CICO Books

Pan Seared Cod With Ginger Lime Broth

Today marks the last day of National Diabetes Awareness Month, which means it its your last chance to drop by both Le Colonial and Brasserie Ruhlmann to indulge in our tasty, curated pix-fixe menu! A percentage of the proceeds from this menu will help us stop childhood obesity, prevent type 2 diabetes, and improve eating habits for children locally.

Courtesy of Le Colonial, please enjoy this recipe for their exquisite pan seared cod with a ginger lime broth.

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Pan Seared Cod With Ginger Lime Broth (Serves 6)

INGREDIENTS:

BROTH

  • 2 stalks lemongrass
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 4 pieces fresh ginger, each 2 inches long
  • 1 Thai chile, halved lengthwise

FISH

  • 3 pounds Cod fillet
  • ½ cup finely chopped cilantro stems
  • ½ cup finely minced lemongrass (about 2 stalks)
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped Thai chiles
  • 2¼ teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2¼ teaspoons kosher salt
  • Juice of 1 to 2 limes
  • Fish sauce to taste
  • Cilantro, for garnish
  • Extra-virgin olive oil, for garnish
  • Fleur de sel, for garnishDIRECTIONS:
  1. To make the broth, trim the lemongrass, leaving only the bottom 5 to 6 inches of the stalks, and peel away the outer layers, leaving only the tender stalks. Bruise the lemongrass by smashing it with a small pot or the dull side of a cleaver. In a medium saucepan over high heat down to a simmer and simmer for 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, cut the cod into 6 equal pieces and set aside. In a small bowl, combine the cilantro stems, lemongrass, olive oil, chiles, garlic, and salt and stir to form a paste. Spread evenly over the tops of the cod fillets.
  3. In a very hot pan, cook the fish until firm to the touch, about 4 minutes per inch of thickness. Just before serving, stir the lime juice and fish sauce to taste into the broth. Place each piece of fish in a bowl and pour ½ cup of the broth around the fish. Garnish with cilantro, a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil, and a sprinkle of fleur de sel.

ENJOY!

Bittersweet Chocolate Cake

Still thinking about what to contribute to tomorrow’s Thanksgiving feast? We’ve got you covered with Le Colonial‘s Bittersweet Chocolate Cake. This is the perfect amount of sweet at the end of a filling, savory meal. Just make sure you leave some space! ‘Tis the season to indulge (a little) after all.
We’ve got a week left of National Diabetes Awareness Month- which means you still have time to drop by both Le Colonial and Brasserie Ruhlmann to check out our curated and healthy prix-fixe menu, perfect for when you’re tired of cooking and over of all of the Thanksgiving leftovers.
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Bittersweet Chocolate Cake
INGREDIENTS:
  • 6 tablespoons stick butter or margarine
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate (61%)
  • 1/3 cup fat-free milk
  • 1/3 cup sugar-free apricot preserves or apricot spreadable fruit
  • 2 teaspoons instant coffee crystals
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1-1/2 cups Equal Spoonful or Granulated*
  • 3 egg whites
  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 oz of Frangelico liqueur * May substitute 36 packets Equal sweetener
INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. For Torte, heat 6 tablespoons butter, 4 ounces dark chocolate, milk, preserves and coffee crystals in small saucepan, whisking frequently until chocolate is almost melted.
  2. Remove pan from heat; continue whisking until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth.
  3. Whisk in egg yolk and vanilla.
  4. Add Equal and Frangelico, whisking until smooth.
  5. Lightly grease bottom of an 8-inch round cake pan and line with parchment or waxed paper.
  6. Beat egg whites and cream of tartar to stiff peaks in large bowl.
  7. Fold chocolate mixture into egg whites; fold in combined flour and salt.
  8. Pour cake batter into pan.
  9. Bake in preheated 350 F oven 20 to 25 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Do not over bake.
  10. Carefully loosen side of cake from pan with small sharp knife, which will keep cake from cracking as it cools.
  11. Cool cake completely in pan on wire rack. Cover and refrigerate 1 to 2 hours or until chilled.
  12. Remove cake from pan and place on serving plate.
  13. Garnish top of cake with dollop of crème fraiche, fresh raspberries and fresh mint, if desired.
  14. Cut cake into wedges.

ENJOY!

Spiced Grain Salad

We continue to bring you healthy recipes from our collaboration with Brasserie Ruhlmann for National Diabetes Awareness Month. Today, check out how to make this spiced grain salad! Including the sauce, the couscous, the vegetables, all the way down to the vinaigrette!

And don’t forget- you can order this and more from a Diabetes friendly menu at both Brasserie Ruhlmann and Le Colonial through the end of the month!

grain-salad

Spiced Grain Salad with roasted vegetables and a curried sherry vinaigrette.

Romasco Sauce

  • 16oz Piquillo pepper
  • 0.5oz Jalapeno chopped
  • 2oz Almonds chopped
  • 1oz Breadcrumbs
  • 1pc Garlic
  • 0.1oz Cumin
  • 0.1oz Cayenne
  • 2oz Sherry wine
  • 4oz Olive oil

Combine the peppers, jalapeno, almonds, crumbs; cumin, cayenne and sherry within a blender until smooth slowly drizzle in the oil until thickened. add salt and pepper

Spiced Couscous Salad

  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seed
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 4 to 5 cardamom seeds
  • 2 strings of saffron
  • ½ cup chopped dried cranberry
  • 1 pound couscous
  • 2.5 cups of vegetable stock
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves garlic (peeled/diced or crushed)
  • 1 teaspoon grated ginger
  • pinch of diced / dried chili pepper
  • ½ of each bell pepper diced, red, yellow and green
  • 1 Spanish onion diced
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa
  • 1 cup cooked faro wheat
  • 1 cup cooked wheat berry
  • 1/2 fennel bulb – diced
  • ¼ cup grated carrot
  • 4 diced Portobello mushroom – roasted in a pan
  • ¼ cup parsley – chopped

To make the Spiced Couscous: Bring vegetable stock to a boil and reserve.

Heat the olive oil, add spices and cook till its aromatic, add the couscous and lightly toast, 2-3 minutes. Top with the boiling stock, stir once and cover with plastic wrap. Allow this to cook for 10-15 minutes. Once the couscous is cooked and all liquid absorbed, separate all the grains using a fork.

Heat up 2 tablespoon of olive oil, add ginger, chili, onions and garlic, and then add bell peppers, cook lightly, reserve.

In a large bowl, combine the quinoa, wheat berry, faro wheat, spiced couscous, bell pepper mixture, raw fennel, roasted Portobello, grated carrot, parsley and season with salt and pepper. Reserve hot.

Roasted Root Vegetables (equal parts)

  • Bell pepper
  • Baby carrots – peeled

Blanched vegetables

  • Asparagus
  • Wax beans

Row vegetables

  • Snap peas
  • Avocado

To make the Roasted Root Vegetables: In a large bowl, toss each individual vegetables in olive oil, honey, crushed garlic, thyme, rosemary, salt and pepper; put each vegetable onto a sheet pan and roast at 500°f until tender and caramelized; repeat for all vegetables separately.

Curried Sherry Vinaigrette

  • 2 tablespoons madras curry
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • ½ cup sherry vinegar

To make the Curried Sherry Vinaigrette:  In a medium sauce pot over low heat, toast the madras curry powder for 5-7 minutes until fragrant; add the honey and slightly caramelize. Combine with the olive oil and sherry vinaigrette. Cool and reserve.

To make the Spiced Couscous Salad:  Season the grain salad with a small amount of the curried sherry vinaigrette. In a salad bowl, spoon a small amount of the warm grain salad in the bottom. Warm a mixture of the roasted vegetables in the oven and place above the grain salad. Finish with a small amount of the curried sherry vinaigrette and sage and thyme from the roast vegetables.

ENJOY!

Panna Cotta

This delicious Panna Cotta recipe comes from our collaboration with Brasserie Ruhlmann for National Diabetes Awareness Month. Try making it for your friends and family this holiday season!

Don’t forget you still have time to enjoy our curated prix-fixe menus at both Brasserie Ruhlmann and Le Colonial until November 30th! Part of the proceeds will go towards raising awareness of how it is to live with diabetes and how to prevent the disease.

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Panna Cotta (Serves 6)

INGREDIENTS:
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 1 vanilla bean, split
  • 1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cup + 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 1 cup + 2 tablespoons
  • Vermont Butter & Cheese
  • Crème fraiche
  • ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons buttermilk
  • 3 gelatin sheets
INSTRUCTIONS:
  1. In a small saucepan set over medium-high heat brings the milk, scraped vanilla bean and sugar to a boil.
  2. Remove from heat and add the gelatin sheets, buttermilk and the heavy cream.
  3. Using a fine sieve strain mixture into a clean mixing bowl.
  4. Carefully fold in the crème fraiche into the milk and sugar mixture.
  5. Pour into six 4-ounce ramekins and refrigerate for a minimum of 4 hours before serving.
TO SERVE:
Served cold, top the Panna Cotta with fresh seasonal fruit
ENJOY!

Roasted Organic Chicken

As part of our collaboration with Brasserie Ruhlmann for National Diabetes Awareness Month, please enjoy this roasted chicken recipe!  Also, remember that all month long, you can order a diabetes friendly menu at Brasserie Ruhlmann and Le Colonial NYC, curated by Lyfebulb.

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 whole roaster chicken, 5 to 7 pounds, giblets removed, rinsed and dried well
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • 1 teaspoon onion, finely minced
  • 1 teaspoon Herbs de Provence
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

 INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees. Place the dried chicken in a large roasting pan.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the remaining ingredients. Gently slide a spoon between the breast meat and the skin to separate the two. Do this on each side. Then using about 1 or 2 teaspoons per side, put some of the mixture under the breast skin and rub it around.
  3. Use the remaining mixture to rub all over the rest of the bird. Tuck the wings under the bird so that the tips don’t burn and tie up the legs with some kitchen twine to cook more evenly
  4. Put the chicken in the oven and reduce the temperature to 375 degrees, roast for about 2 hours.
  5. When the chicken is done, remove it from the oven and allow it to sit for at least 15 to 20 minutes.

Perfect Appetizer Platter

img_3944Fall is here and with that come countless Sundays watching football and hosting friends.  What do you do when it becomes too cold to grill outside?  Instead of ordering carb-heavy pizza or sugary chicken wings, try this delicious, protein-rich and diabetic friendly appetizer platter!  It is inspired by ingredients that are common in Sweden that remind us of home.  It will not cause any blood sugar spikes, but is not only good for diabetics, but for anyone trying to maintain a well-balanced and healthy diet.

The hard-boiled eggs, smoked salmon, ham, and fish roe are excellent sources of protein, avocados have great health benefits as well, and are jam-packed with healthy fats, while tomatoes are rich with beneficial nutrients, antioxidants, and vitamins.

All you need is the following:

  • Hard-boiled eggs sliced in halves
  • Avocados sliced lengthwise into bite-sized pieces
  • Smoked salmon pieces rolled and secured with toothpicks
  • Prosciutto or ham rolled and secured with toothpicks
  • Fish roe
  • Tomatoes sliced in quarters
  • Lemon
  • Parsley

Place the ingredients on your favorite serving platter, drizzle with lemon, and finish off with some parsley.  Serve with some whole wheat crackers and voila!

This recipe is easy to prepare and requires no actual cooking, apart from boiling a few eggs ?

Kale and Goat Cheese Frittata Cups

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(adapted from thekitchn.com)

Makes 8 individual cups

Ingredients

2 cups chopped kale
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 teaspoons red pepper flakes
8 large eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
Dash ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 cup goat cheese, crumbled

Preparation

1.  Preheat the oven to 350°F. To get 2 cups kale, remove the leaves from the kale ribs. Wash and dry the leaves and cut them into 1/2-inch-wide strips.

2.  In a 10-inch skillet, cook the garlic in 1 tablespoon of oil over medium-high heat for 30 seconds. Add the kale and red pepper flakes and cook until wilted, 1 to 2 minutes.

3.  In a medium bowl, beat the eggs with the salt and pepper. Add the kale and oregano to the egg mixture.

4.  Using a 12-cup muffin tin, use the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to grease 8 of the cups (you may also use butter or non-stick spray if you’d prefer). Sprinkle the tops with goat cheese. Bake until they are set in the center, about 25 to 30 minutes.

Rosemary Butternut Creme Sauce

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Ingredients:

  • 1 medium butternut squash
  • 2 shallots, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 t. dried OR 1-2 T. fresh rosemary
  • 1 c. full fat coconut milk
  • 1/2 – 3/4 c. vegetable broth
  • 1/2 c. Nutritional yeast (optional)
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 T. Coconut oil

Preheat oven to 375’F. Slice the in 1/2 and roast until tender. (you can do this step a day or two ahead. Take advantage of another time that you already have your oven fired up and save on running it twice in this warm weather!). Allow the squash to cool. Remove the skin and place the squash in the food processor or high speed blender.

Place 1 T. coconut oil in a large pan over medium heat; add shallots and garlic and saute. Add the other remaining ingredients to the processor/blender while the onions and garlic cook. Once tender, add the onions and garlic and blend until smooth.

For a gluten free, high nutrient meal:

Spiralize or thin slice with a mandolin or peeler 3 lbs of zucchini and saute that in 1 T. coconut oil along with thinly sliced shiitake mushrooms. Once they start to become soften add the sauce and cook until tender!

What to Pack as a Diabetic

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Maybe you’re planning a trip soon and would love a travel checklist for diabetes?

(I made you a travel checklist for diabetes below, make sure to check it out!)

What is necessary to bring along on a long trip with diabetes?

Sometimes I feel like diabetes just has its own luggage to bring along, physically as well as emotionally.

The emotional luggage we’ll have to discuss another time, because this time I want to talk about the physical luggage Diabetes brings along. Especially when traveling.

As if packing for a trip isn’t stressful enough (“what shoes should I bring?”, “does this dress go with that jacket?”, “what make up should I bring?” and “WILL IT ALL FIT IN MY BAG?!” – you get the point…), as an added bonus, you also have to haul around on all the stuff that you need for diabetes to keep in line.

I always bring all my supplies in my carry on bag when I fly. That way it’s harder to lose it, and the insulin stays at the right temperature throughout my trip.

The size of said carry-on bag has changed, though, in favor of trying to save my shoulder from falling off from carrying all the heavy stuff. Now I bring along a small, cabin sized wheelie bag where I have all my supplies, from insulin, to pumps, to test strips, to hypo treatment.

I also deposit a few things in my traveling buddy’s, usually my husband’s, bag. At least that way, if I lose my carry on, I’m not completely stranded in terms of diabetes. He has an extra blood sugar meter and test strips, and insulin with emergency-syringes. And glucose tabs. One can never have enough of those.

While I make sure to bring along most things on my travel checklist for diabetes, I don’t always bring everything.

Like ketone sticks, for example. I don’t usually bring those, unless I’m traveling somewhere really remote with no pharmacy within the next hour or so of driving. I figure that I can buy them pretty much anywhere I go.

On the other hand, insulin and BG test strips can get really darn expensive, not to mention inaccessible without a prescription, unless you prepare properly and take enough with you for your whole trip. “Enough” here means way too much, by the way. You never know what might happen, so it’s better to be prepared for most things that may happen.

Food

And, pretty please, get organized and bring your own snacks. Food on the road is generally beyond terrible, and like that you know you can at least eat something. I bring things like nuts and dried meat and other cutleryless foods on the plane, whilst in a car or on the train you can get a little more creative. This time around I’m going to make low carb pancakes and wrap them up in foil to bring along on my long flight, as I know from experience that food on flights is never good.

Another note regarding food, please don’t get fooled by the “need” to snack, which is most commonly masking the fact that you’re bored out of your brain.

Water

Traveling by plane is like sitting in the middle of the desert, although maybe not quite as warm. It’s dehydrating like nobody’s business! Being hydrated can really be one of the keys to better diabetes management, so please do us both a favor and DRINK A LOT OF WATER! (and skip the booze up in the air, but that one is evident, right?)

Security

Getting through airport security can be a lot easier than it’s made up to be. This is of course assuming that you don’t meet an a-hole security agent.

In my 30 years of living with diabetes, having traveled to many different parts of the world (although I have MUCH left to see and visit!), I’ve been stopped exactly twice at security. Once for my test stripes (what, you didn’t mind the syringe full of potentially very deadly stuff in my bag? Ok, then.) And once because my pump set the alarm off. In both cases it was easy to explain, and I didn’t even have to show my medical certificate. Security agents see so many diabetes supplies on a daily basis; they’re barely phased by them anymore. At least within Europe.

Now, I’ve heard that US TSA agents can be a little trickier to handle. For example, they have no problem jeopardizing your super expensive medical equipment and tell you to go through the full body scanner wearing your insulin pump, for example. I would insist on the pat down, not risking any breakages or malfunctions. This of course means that it might take a little longer for you to get through, but it’s worth it, and as long as you know about it, you can plan for it.

The bottom line is, as long as you’re nice and cooperative (enough) to them, they’ll usually treat you with the same respect.

Anyway, let’s check out the goodie in this blog post, my Travel Checklist for Diabetes.

These are the absolute essentials that you need to bring with you (or at least consider bringing with you). If you think “I’ve never needed that before”, you should probably take it along anyway, as traveling can make your body do some funky stuff.

Travel checklist

  • Enough insulin to cover the days you’re gone (this should be a no brainer!) Make sure you bring both basal and bolus insulin, even if you’re using an insulin pump. You just never know…
  • Blood glucose meter & enough test strips, extra batteries (it might even be good to bring an extra BG meter.)
  • CGM sensors
  • Keto sticks (As I said, I don’t always bring them)
  • Glucose tabs (or whatever you use to treat a hypo)  (Bring too much of this, you never know what your body think of your new location.)
  • (See above)
  • Glucagon Kit (most airlines don’t have these on board their planes. Better be safe than sorry!)
  • Alcohol wipes (these are great, not just for setting infusion sets and cleaning fingers, but also for wiping surfaces like tables, handles or cutlery that seems unclean.)
  • Other prescription medication and supplements you may be taking (easy one to forget, trust me. I’ve done it before.)
  • If you’re going somewhere really warm (lucky you!), bring something like the FRIO bag to keep your insulin in. (http://www.frioinsulincoolingcase.com)
  • Medical Certificate (This can save you at security checks!)
  • Diabetes ID (If you’re found unconscious somewhere, I’m sure you’d prefer that the EMTs knows what you’ve got.)
  • If you’re going somewhere remote, bring a glucagon set. (Again, you never know.)
  • Your BG diary, if you use one. (Otherwise there’s some great apps for that, for example www.glucosebuddy.com or mysugr.com)
  • Address and telephone number of your doctor’s office.

If you are on injections, also bring:

  • Insulin pens, plus back ups
  • Pen needles

If you’re on a pump, also bring:

  • Your pump, as well as possibly getting a back-up pump. (This can be ordered from your pump manufacturer.)
  • Batteries/Power adapter
  • Cartridges (if your pump uses those)
  • Infusion sets, or just enough of patch pumps
  • Syringes/pen for emergencies
  • Basal insulin for emergencies

If you’re planning a pumpcation (vacation without your pump):

  • Your action plan, that you’ve talked to your med-team about
  • Pens and needles
  • Basal and bolus insulin

It’s better to take too much than too little!

I’ve made a pretty print out of this list that you can print out and tick off the boxes as you put the items into your bag.

This blog was originally published on Hanna’s website at http://hannaboethius.com/2015/05/travel-checklist-for-diabetes/.

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