Real Talk With Dave- HOW TO: THE NEED TO KNOW ON NEEDLES

 QUESTION FOR FELLOW DIABETICS : HOW DO YOU DISPOSE OF YOUR USED NEEDLES?

            This is one of THE MOST asked questions those of us with Diabetes often face.

 MY JOURNEY TO SAFETY:

When I first got diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes back in 2008, I vividly remember how unaware I was on the topic of safe needle disposal. I didn’t know of the harmful effects of throwing away used needles right into the trash.

Fast forward to one year after my diagnosis, I setup my very first pump at the age of 12! This opened up a whole new world that I never experienced before.

It can be pretty daunting when you’re 12 years old. I learned a whole encyclopedia’s worth of experiences. I learned everything from putting on my pump to how to wear it and even how to actually use it!  I’d like to share with you my top tips for disposing needles safely.

My journey to safety was NOT an easy one! I had lots of trash that needed to be thrown away. A used needle and inserter were among that pile of trash, so without the knowledge I needed, I threw away my used needles in the trash!!!

MY TOP TIPS ON HOW TO DISPOSE NEEDLES SAFELY:

  1. DO NOT THROW USED NEEDLES AND INSERTERS IN TRASH

  2. ENLIST A PUMP TRAINER

    • When I began my new world as a T1D, I constantly threw away my used needles in the trash. My pump trainer quickly caught me in the act of throwing the needles away unsafely and showed me how to break my long-term habit!

 

  1. HAVE ACCESS TO A SHARPS CONTAINER:

    • Unused needles go in a sharps container as well as used syringes, lancets, and any other form of needles.

Today, this is something that I am very passionate about. After  educating myself on the dangers of disposing used needles the wrong way, I made it my goal to always have a sharps container in sight. Whether I am at home following a set routing or creating temporary plans for traveling-I always make sure to dispose safely!

 

  1. LOCATE A SHARPS DISPOSAL ANYWHERE YOU ARE WITH SAFENEEDLEDISPOSAL.ORG

  • I partnered with SafeNeedleDisposal.org to bring awareness on this very important topic. This website allows you to search for drop off locations in your area by zip code and teaches you how to safely store your used needles at home! Some areas even allow disposal in your household trash bin if placed in the proper container. I find that education is so very important since many may not be fully aware of the potential dangers in disposing their needles unsafely. As SafeNeedleDisposal.org states, the bottom line is that safety is the point.

HOW TO USE SAFENEEDLEDISPOSAL.ORG:

  1. LOCATE DROP-OFF LOCATION:
    • Use the site to locate the appropriate drop-off location in your area is so vital and so very convenient.
  2. STORE UP USED NEEDLES:
    • Store up all your used needles for a few months.
  3. DESIGNATE A REGULAR DISPOSAL DAY:
    • Designate a certain day to go out and dispose of your needles at your local drop-off location. You are not only bettering the environment, but your own health and safety as well.

 Let’s be honest ,as Diabetics, we go through lots of needles, daily, weekly, monthly, and so on. Unfortunately, there is no cure for Diabetes yet, so we must insert pump sites, CGM sites, inject Insulin, and prick our fingers daily! Basically, we go through LOTS of needles and they need to go SOMEWHERE at the end of the day. By having designated areas and a great website to help us find those locations, it becomes a great way to dispose of needles both safely and efficiently.

Bottom line, safety is the point.

Live well,

Dave

Chronic Illness & Anxiety: A Chicken & Egg Scenario

Anxiety and depression are prevalent for those who suffer from chronic illness. In fact, one study found that 40% of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) patients had abnormal anxiety levels and this drastically increases to 80% when the patient is in a flare-up . With chronic illness typically, there is a feeling of loss of control over your own life which can in turn cause stress, anxiety and depression.

Chicken or Egg?

I was diagnosed with IBD 9 years ago and while I have learned to (mostly) manage the symptoms of my disease over time, I have yet to master the feelings of worry and anxiety. After having a bowel resection surgery, I have been in clinical remission but not without its bumps along the way. The fear of the unknown can do a number on one’s mental health. The possibility of a flare-up always lives in the back of my mind. I can remember the countless visits to the hospital, procedures, medications, and extreme pain. I was barely able to take care of myself, and now that I have children, I worry that if I were to have a flare-up, I wouldn’t be able to take care of them or participate in their lives in a meaningful way.

I know that having a chronic illness has increased my anxiety levels, but does stress and anxiety exasperate my symptoms? Research shows that stress can worsen symptoms and cause a relapse of remission. From WebMD “When someone is under stress, the body gears up for a fight-or-flight response by secreting certain hormones, including adrenalin, as well as molecules called cytokines. They stimulate the immune system, which triggers inflammation. In people whose ulcerative colitis is in remission, this sets the stage for the return of their symptoms, known as a flare-up.” This is something I’ve experienced and heard from talking to fellow chronic illness sufferers. Lack of quality sleep and environmental stressors have often caused a revival of symptoms which can be a slippery slope to a full-on flare.

Anxiety definition (from Merriam-Webster):
an abnormal and overwhelming sense of apprehension and fear often marked by physical signs (such as tension, sweating, and increased pulse rate), by doubt concerning the reality and nature of the threat, and by self-doubt about one’s capacity to cope with it.

Stress definition (from Merriam-Webster):
constraining force or influence: such a physical, chemical, or emotional factor that causes bodily or mental tension and may be a factor in disease causation
Anxiety = Fear

When speaking about Generalized Anxiety Disorder it is often associated with people who have irrational fears or worry for no reason. When talking about sufferers from chronic illness, often the anxiety is derived from perceived AND real fears. From my experience, my anxiety stems from a fear of a past trauma reoccurring. Fear of pain, a flare-up, of being out with no access to bathrooms. Fear of foods and eating, procedures, fear of damage caused by long term use of medications (i.e. Remicade can cause an increase in cancer). Fear of missing work, fear that people don’t understand, fear of drug/procedure costs and benefits coverage. This can be scary stuff and can plague your thoughts even when in remission.

From diagnosis to remission the fear still exists, it just changes in size and scope. A newly diagnosed patient can go through stages of grieving and without having the tools to manage the illness it can be very scary. Fast forward to remission, chronic illness has many layers and can be unpredictable. No matter how much you’ve done to manage your illness, there is still a possibility you can have a relapse. The feeling of helplessness can trigger depression, but on the flip-side depression can slow recovery. This begets a vicious cycle which can be hard to get under control.

Coping Physically and Mentally

Patients must cope with not just the disease itself but the mental health side effects of it. While I believe I’ve received excellent care from my Gastroenterologist, he deals with only clinical IBD symptoms so often the mental health aspect of the disease gets overlooked. It is important to bring up your emotional health to your doctor when suffering from a chronic illness despite the perceived stigma. Having that aspect under control could potentially help with physical symptoms. Anxiety and chronic illness can be a chicken and egg scenario where consideration must be given to both to have a holistic treatment plan.

Strategies for Coping With Anxiety:

Find your support: whether that be a close friend, family member, a fellow patient, or support group like Lyfebulb, knowing you aren’t in this alone makes a world of difference.

Don’t assume the worst: challenge those negative thoughts! Remember that you have survived thus far, and all those experiences make you stronger.

Try yoga, meditation, or deep-breathing:  Research has shown this to be an effective complementary therapy for patients with IBD.

Seek counseling – an impartial third party can help instill coping techniques

SOURCES: [Sharma P, Poojary G, Dwivedi SN, Deepak KK. Effect of Yoga-Based Intervention in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Int J Yoga Therap. 2015;25(1):101-12. doi: 10.17761/1531-2054-25.1.101. ]
Cannabis is an increasingly popular therapy for IBD with cannabidiol (CBD) showing promise as an anti-inflammatory and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as a pain reducer and sleep-aid. [Ahmed W, Katz S. Therapeutic Use of Cannabis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Gastroenterol Hepatol (N Y). 2016;12(11):668-679.]

– Krystal Laferriere, Lyfebulb Ambassador (Instagram @xtra_ordinary_girl )

3 Herbal Ways to Cope with Chronic Conditions

Herbal remedies have been in use for centuries, and they are viewed as a more holistic approach to healthcare. While by no means should you disregard the importance of modern day medicine, herbal remedies are simply a natural approach you can take in order to deal with pain or any other chronic condition that you might be facing.

herbal benefits

Three of these herbal treatments can include watching what you eat, drinking herbal tea, and purchasing the necessary vitamins. Of course, you also should not underestimate the importance of potentially combining this with more traditional medicine, especially depending on the severity of your health problem.

1. Watch what you eat

Your first priority is always to watch what you eat. Food is fuel for your body, and even if your diet has not caused your chronic condition, you can help alleviate any symptoms you experience by eating food that is good for you.

This means adopting a diet that is nutritious and well balanced above anything else. Cut out any sugar, as well as food that is overly processed and fried. You will not only start to feel better once you do this, but your mental health will improve as well. In essence, you are working towards feeling like your best self.

herbal tea

2. Drinking herbal tea

Herbal tea is something that you can purchase from anywhere, and it is yet another remedy that has been used for a long time to treat an illness or another condition.

Every single type of tea offers a different kind of benefit, although everything is rich in antioxidants, whether it’s green, white, oolong, purely herbal, or something else.

3. Purchasing the best vitamins and supplements

There are countless vitamins and supplements that you can purchase in order to assist you with any health problem that you might be facing, as well. Most importantly, however, you need to determine what the best source to purchase them from is.

Concept, food, meal.

In order to find all-natural products that are affordable, and that you can simply get delivered right to your doorstep, consider looking at companies that have already established themselves in this field, such as Swanson. Once you purchase the products that support your immune system and even assist with your respiratory health, among other areas of your physical wellbeing, you will be tremendously glad that you made the investment in the first place.

Combining it with medicine prescribed by your doctor

Depending on the severity of your chronic condition, the chances are that you will need to take medication prescribed by your doctor. However, why not combine this with other herbal approaches and remedies, particularly the ones outlined thus far? This type of approach is often guaranteed to help you get your health back on track.

Herbal medicine is affordable and easily accessible to everyone no matter where you are located. It predates current medicine, but as this article has already mentioned, that does not mean that you should disregard the importance of modern day medicine. Instead, think about what your options are for combining the two approaches, thereby adopting the best possible routine for your health.

Working Out With No Obstacles

Hello friends! My name is Judy and I’ve been a T1 diabetic for 18 years now! You may know me from my Instagram account @hyper.hypo and blog/shop (www.diahyperhypo.com), and you may already know how much I love to help other T1s with my experiences and tips. I believe that diabetes should never be a limitation, and with a positive attitude and positive thoughts, it is easier to live with this disease that often feels like riding a rollercoaster.

I know that having T1 can often lead to a lot of questions:  ‘’Should I inject for this’’, ‘’Should I eat now?’, ‘’Should I tell people I’m low and not actually drunk?’’ However, in my opinion, one of the main subjects that us T1s tend to ask questions about is type one diabetes and exercise. A lot of diabuddies think that they need to workout less or not at all because of their numbers, or even limit themselves to a type of exercise but I am telling you with full confidence: THAT IS NOT TRUE!

I believe so much in the affirmation: ‘’Diabetes is not a limitation’’ that I decided to launch my own line of diabetes sportswear.

I decided to create something that will empower a lot of type ones when exercising: a sports bra with an integrated pocket to put the insulin pump (or PDM or supplies or phone, you decide!). I know that working out while having T1 diabetes brings extra responsibilities, so having a pocket that will let you have an intensive and satisfying workout will motivate you to get off your couch and move!

In my case, every time I work out, I feel good. You may think: ‘’Okay Judy that is so cliché!’’ It is, I have to admit it, but it’s the truth! Here are my 3 main tips that help me exercise with type one diabetes:

  1. It’s okay to change your schedule

Be mindful. Accept the fact that you didn’t stick to your workout plan. Accept the fact that you exercised during the evening and not in the morning like you planned to because of your numbers. Once you accept that your schedule might me modified, you will be happier while working out. Things happen!

2. Try to workout with no insulin on board

Working out in the morning works best because there is no insulin in the body (well usually). Sometimes, the blood sugar might spike, so it is important to know your body and to know that a correction might be needed. If there is insulin on board (meaning you injected yourself not so long before), you might need to set a temporary basal rate (if you’re on the pump) or try to inject less insulin before a meal/snack before a workout for next time.

3. Yes, what you eat is important!

Food. Everybody loves food, right? The thing with food is that it can give you instant satisfaction, but might get you lazy if you don’t eat something good for you. Eating a lot of vegetables, fruits and fibers will get you motivated and won’t make you say:

“Ugh yeah I’ll go to the gym tomorrow.” Eating proteins and carbs coming from non-fatty foods will make you feel good, help with your digestion, and affect your numbers before/ after a workout in a beautiful way!

And always remember: Train 30mn a day to avoid being tired 24h a day!

– Judy

Keep Fighting Toward Your Fitness Goals

So I thought I’d share how difficult it is to live with a chronic illness and try and stay fit.

The picture on the right was last year… when I had just had a colonoscopy to determine how inflamed my bowel was. Shortly after, I was hospitalized due to my colitis. In that week I had lost around 8kg in weight in the space of 5 days. Everything I ate went straight out. I had been in decent physical shape externally but internally I was in bits. I felt incredibly weak. I had no energy, but I still tried to work and live my life as normally as possible. At the time I even tried to celebrate the fact I looked half decent. 🙈 But when you look at the photo closely, I look very skinny. I was then put on some heavy duty drugs to get my colitis in check. Gained loads of weight in hospital and then went home.

Fast forward to may of this year. I’ve managed to get to a decent shape however I’m the strongest I have ever been. I manage to beat my personal gym goals every week and my colitis seems to be under control. 🤛👏

I saw this photo in my feed and wanted you to understand that physically and mentally I’m in a much better place. Everything is going in the right direction and with more hardwork and dedication I’ll get to where I want to be.

Even last year I said I’ll have to start my journey again. It really got me down but if something is worth doing… it wouldn’t be easy….or everyone would do it 😅👌

It doesn’t matter where you are in your IBD journey. It will always keep moving forward it you BELIEVE you can do it

IBD May Be a Beast, But It Is Worth Fighting

I was at the top of my game having just graduated college with a Wall Street career all lined up and BAM, just like that, the colitis hit.

At the tender age of 22, when my life was just supposed to be beginning, my life became a perpetual case of where’s the nearest bathroom and having to bolt to avoid accidents. Between wearing diapers and trying to date while popping pills and using enemas, I began to realize how tenuous life is. It was a scary proposition because my dad passed away at 39 years old from a wicked case of Crohn’s that turned into colorectal cancer, and his sister quickly followed suit. And here I was, barely awake from my first of 100+ colonoscopies, hearing the words ulcerations and inflammation thrown around. It was unnerving and terrifying all at once.

Today, 12 years, 20+ surgeries and hundreds of procedures later. I’m happy to say that I’m still alive and kicking. I continued working in investment banking, taking time off to mend from surgeries until the stress, the fatigue and constant flare-ups did me in enough times. A decade ago, after returning from my 24th birthday in Cancun, I developed a horrible case of food poisoning and I was never the same again. I took antibiotics, which gave me c.dificile, a debilitating infection caused by antibiotic overuse. It resulted in 15-20 bowel movements a day, watery diarrhea, nausea and dehydration.

And that c.diff subsequently brought about a never-ending colitis flare that lasted 8 years. I cried in my former gastroenterologist’s office as I had an accident in his hallway and as I continued to lose weight and along with it, my sense of self and personality. At the end of 2007, I was 135 lbs. By mid-2008, I had tried every medication and alternative treatment under the sun, lost 50 lbs., and was being fed by an intravenous PICC line in my arm. I was dying.

I was rushed to the hospital where my surgeon removed my colon on the 4th of July. As I found out later, he and his boss, the chair of colorectal surgery,

…were unsure I would survive the operation. Heck, I was certain I wouldn’t.

But I had no choice. I was told death was certain if I didn’t have surgery. As Independence Day came and went, I woke up alive and very thankful to no longer be dependent on a disease-ravaged colon. And overnight, I found myself a new bff, my stoma Snuffleupagus, as named by my ever-devoted husband.

It took about 2 months of receiving IV nutrition and antibiotics before I began to eat more than a morsel of food. And how can I forget spending my 25th birthday in the hospital with yet another bout of c. dificile? I recovered nearly 6 months later and went on to have some more surgeries so that my surgeon could fashion a j-shaped pouch from my small intestine, which would allow me to defecate like a normal person again. Before long, I developed pouchitis, a new brand of inflammation that hits in the j-pouch and causes IBD symptoms of bloody diarrhea 20 times a day.

After several months of on-again, off-again pouchitis, I was left on a rotation of antibiotics for a few years. That was until the pouch began to fistulize, or burrow holes into other organs. My diagnosis was changed from UC to Crohn’s. I developed a total of 5 rectovaginal abscesses that became full-fledged fistulae, which resulted in UTIs galore along with immense pain and bleeding, in addition to multiple surgeries. Along with it, I developed a whole host of extraintestinal joint and dermatologic manifestations of the Crohn’s.

To allow the fistulae to heal, I was yet again rushed to the operating table and was given a stoma. I was again fed by IV lines as I began to retry biologics; when none of them worked, I was told to have the pouch excised. I had exhausted all my options and fought so hard for 6 years to keep that pouch. I felt like I had failed.

My pouch was removed, and I was left with a large wound and a permanent ostomy. Except the wound never closed like it was supposed to. I bled for months and went for a second opinion at the Cleveland Clinic where I was told that the Crohn’s had continued, and pieces of j-pouch and rectum were still inside. There was a massive honeycomb-like abscess in my pelvis where the j-pouch once was. According to MRI reports, a pelvic fistula had formed and was headed for my spine. I was told it could paralyze me. Major corrective surgery was my only option. I was given a PICC line yet again to deliver IV antibiotics and restarted Adalimumab.

I went for a third opinion at Mayo Clinic where the surgeon wanted to try a new technique. He re-excised the pouch 3 more times so that no pieces of bowel would be left behind to cause the Crohn’s to spread. He left a wound the size of a small football and I was left with a wound VAC attached for 4 weeks thereafter. Every alternate day I had a procedure under sedation in my room to debride the wound. The VAC was pulled after a month and I was left with a 3-inch deep wound for my mom and husband to pack.

After such excruciating pain, I thought I was out of the woods, but another RV fistula was found, which was perplexing because I had no rectum left. It was just a hole, something I was told had only been seen twice before. My doctor prescribed antibiotics, 6-mp and a double dose of Ustekinumab, which was still in trials for Crohn’s. It took several months of misery, but the wound finally closed, and the fistula was untraceable.

Come 2016, the word “remission” was being thrown around for the first time in my life. And I didn’t know what to do with myself. When a disease snatches one’s womanhood, how does one begin to resurrect oneself?

Nevertheless, after 3 near-death experiences, I am thankful to be alive and for every single surgery and every single breath. Every time I have fallen, I have picked myself up higher than before. And that is my very own personal miracle and my greatest achievement to date. My medical staff, my friends and family and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation are my rocks, my backbones and a source of constant support. Every time I lose hope, they help me stay afloat.

A year and a half later, yes, I have 8 new chronic diagnoses to manage, but I refuse to go down without a fight. My battle with Crohn’s has given me a newfound appreciation for life, a joie de vivre, like no other. Not a single day goes by without me remembering how far I’ve come and how much life I have yet to live. I may not be able to work but I am able to volunteer in between health crises. Co-facilitating the Foundation’s Women’s Support Group has given me a voice, a platform to raise awareness for these awful diseases and help women like myself advocate for treatment and maintenance of care.

IBD may be a beast, but it is worth putting up a fight for your loved ones and most of all, for yourself.

IBD may derail our careers, educations and relationships but it cannot take away who we are at our core. We must keep on fighting the good fight and never lose hope.

Here I am today, continuing to fight in the memory of my late father, for my dear mother and husband as well as all the friends who have stood by me along the way. I fight for new treatments to be developed and for a cure someday. I fight for you and me, for all of us at the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation.

THE MORNING SUGAR: A Window into your Type One Management

I lie in bed with one eye open, ears still ringing from my poorly selected, overplayed alarm tone. I sit half hunched over my glucose monitor attempting the first blood-drop-to-test-strip co-ordination of the day. Its 05h30, I have fasted for 6 to 8 hours, it’s time to dive into diabetes. My test strip sucks up the drop of blood and counts down to my first glucose reading of the day:

BEEP: 4.6mmol/l (84)

OR

BEEP: 9.6mmol/l (173)

OR

BEEP 16.6mmol/l (299)

The good, the average and the ugly.
These are the 3 general ranges of readings that might greet me at the first finger prick of the day. It’s only one of the many sugar readings that lie ahead, but it is a special one to pay attention to, as your morning glucose reading can provide important insight into your diabetes control.

A fasted reading has a myriad of information which you can choose to ignore, or preferably dissect and investigate for optimum diabetes control. I believe it is vital to ask myself why? Why is my blood glucose this level and what were my preceding actions?

I will take you through my 3 ranges and my general approach to morning sugar readings and how I personally troubleshoot these readings. We each tackle diabetes differently, but hopefully the following brings some insight into your morning sugars or encourages you think critically of those interesting rise and shine numbers!

The “Gem”
My personal values are 3.8-5.6mmol/l

Oh this is a sweet, gem of a reading. It’s the real “roll out of bed on the right side” number.
Perfectly in range, it is still important to acknowledge the formula that achieved this number. We could all do with a little positive reinforcement and mindfully recognize and enjoy our diabetes successes! I always ask myself, “What did I do well?”

This sugar reading generally informs me that I have correctly dosed my long acting insulin as it did not bring me into the clutch of hypoglycaemia when fasting during my sleep. It was also sufficient to meet the cascade of morning hormones such as cortisol and hyperglycaemia it brings along with it. This sugar happily greets me when I don’t snack after dinner and I eat around 3 hours before bed-time. This plan allows for an honest, stable blood sugar reading before bed where my injected insulin has already peaked in activity, and I can expect predictable glucose readings as I sleep.

The “Meh”
My personal values are 6-9mmol/l

It’s a sugar range that is higher than I would like for a fasting blood glucose level, but it’s not remotely the end of the world. To solve this morning glucose and to prevent it creeping higher, I have my insulin dosage for my breakfast plus a dash more insulin to correct. I wait 20-30 minutes for my insulin to start working and bring my glucose down before having my breakfast. I ask my “why?” and make a mental note of how I could improve and act accordingly. If went to bed with a great blood glucose level and I woke up high, it could be various things:

1. Insufficient long-acting insulin: The Dawn phenomenon

When I have my continuous glucose monitor (CGM), the Dexcom, attached, this will be displayed as a nice steady graph with readings in glucose range for the first 2/3rds of sleep, only to find in the few hours before waking my blood glucose slowly and steadily increases. This is due to the get-up-and-go hormones that pump through your body to prepare you for waking and tackling the day. These sneaky buggers include growth hormones, cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine and they increase your insulin resistance, causing blood sugar to rise.

2. Too much insulin: The Somogyi effect

This is an interesting stress response of your body, a rebound effect of low blood glucose while sleeping. If you have too much insulin, long acting or short acting, and you experience a low while sleeping your body mounts a survival response and encourages your body to release sugar back into your blood via adrenaline and cortisol. This low may not be rapid or severe enough to cause a seizure, but sufficient to mount a physiological survival response from your body.

3. Not enough short-acting insulin

This is usually prompted by snacking before bed and eating late. My stomach is still full and has not emptied. My blood sugar will be in range when I get to sleep, but as my tummy works to digest my food, sugar trickles into my blood which I thought I had sufficiently covered by my short-acting. This especially occurs if I eat meals that have a carbohydrate, protein and high fat content. It has even been dubbed “The Pizza Effect”, where fats and protein delay the absorption of carbohydrates from a meal. The most challenging part is that you don’t know when the carbohydrates are going to be dumped into your bloodstream as sugar. It could be more than 5 hours until you feel the true effect of your meal. This could also be a reason for a really high morning blood glucose reading, the one where you would rather turn over and head back to sleep, which brings me to my final morning range, which I like to call the “Lie in Bed for a Few Minutes in Denial”.

The “Lie in Bed for a Few Minutes in Denial”
My personal values are anything double digit

The “Man, I messed up” feels. I most likely did not give myself enough insulin for the previous night’s meal, or I ate complete rubbish, did a massive carbohydrate count guestimate (that’s right folks- guess and estimate can really be combined into one perfect word), it could be “the pizza effect”, or I forgot my long acting insulin.

The alternative explanation is that I woke up with low in the middle of the night and quite passionately, dove into my bedside glucose stash, bathed myself in sugar before falling back asleep in a pile a sweet wrappers. (Yes, I have awoken with gummy sweets melted into my back and bed sheet).

If my sugars are really bad in the morning, there is usually a pretty grand, blatantly obvious reason as to why they are absolutely deranged. I find myself glancing in the mirror, at my poor, hard-done-by face to ask myself why? My expression smirks, “Oh girl, you know why. You know.”

This is where the power of the mind can transform your day. You can switch to victim. You can choose guilt and actively bring yourself down. You can choose to let a number on a plastic monitor define your day or you can free yourself from mental binds, for you are capable, you are strong and you are going to tackle the day.

My go-to plan of action:

1. Massive bottle of water with loads of top ups
2. Small simple, low sugar breakfast (I find waiting for my sugars to come down before eating leaves me more frantic and stressed)
3. More water
4. Add Insulin
Tip: Don’t give yourself 70000 units because you are panicking and desperately want your sugar to go down as quickly as possible (TRACY SANDERS I am talking to you girl). A resultant severe hypoglycaemia does not make it easier to improve the day.
5. Forgive yourself, give thanks to your body for all the other goodness it brings to you and power forward.

Transform your WHY’s into WISE, pay attention to each nugget of information your body and glucometer communicates to you. By building up an understanding of your sugars, you build a stronger relationship with your body and mind. Work closely with your support network, endocrinologist and diabetes educator to make the correct adjustments to suite your body, always ask questions and challenge your knowledge and experience of type one.

Real Talk with Dave: How to Stay Positive with T1D (Dealing with Burnout)

Have you ever felt overwhelmed with Type 1 Diabetes to the point where you just don’t want to deal with it anymore? You may feel the need to cope with your Diabetes in a different way. Many will go off their Insulin pump for a while and go back to daily syringes/ pen injections as a way to feel a sense of freedom from this disease. Unfortunately, us Diabetics cannot just “stop” Diabetes. We have to fight daily in order to stay alive. We have to take Insulin in different moments throughout the day and watch our blood sugars fluctuate from stubborn highs to difficult lows. At some point, we all go through a burnout phase where T1D just doesn’t feel bearable anymore, that is why I have put together a little guide as to how you can stand up to the burnout phase and keep on pushing through!

1/ Keep a positive mindset – This seems easier said than done, but trust me, in order to feel a positive presence on you as you go about your day, every morning, start the day fresh and new and remind yourself of all your accomplishments in life and how far you have come. Always let yourself know who you are and how brave and strong you are.

2/ Self-talk – Every day is different and some days (as we all know) can be very bad in terms of our Diabetes. There is a lot to think about throughout our day, things such as what our blood sugars may be, what supplies we need to have with us as we go somewhere during the day, and also planning for emergencies, that being said, we must make room for thoughts of reassurance. We need to talk ourselves through a bad low and tell ourselves that everything will be okay, just like it always is. We need to be our own friend who will be there when no one else is. Having positive and calm self-talk is a good way to walk you through your day and be your own hero.

3/ Do what makes you feel alive – we all face Diabetes every moment of everyday, and it can almost feel as though everything is about Diabetes. Sometimes, we may not want to think about Diabetes all the time (within reason), that is why we need to make time for other things in life that bring us true joy and help take our minds off of T1D for a bit. Doing something you love, such as going out with friends, playing a sport, or spending time with family can be the very thing that can help you cope with T1D burnout.

4/ Take a pump holiday – Though it may be difficult to keep your blood sugars in your normal range, taking a break from wearing your Insulin pump (if you wear one) can make you feel free and have one less thing constantly reminding you of your Diabetes. You can do this for a day, a week, or even a whole month, it’s really up to you. However long you need to take a break from wearing your pump, go for it, because what some don’t realize is that wearing a pump can change a person and mess with their emotions (in some cases) to the point where they feel “different”, which isn’t that case at all. Wearing a pump is a blessing and is what essentially keeps us alive each and every day.

5/ Accept your struggle – Just know that eventually, this T1D burnout phase you may be going through will go away and you will be able to get back in the game. Remember, we ALL face burnout periods in our life, but guess what? We all get over them eventually. Accepting the fact that you are stressed out, annoyed, and tired of T1D is sometimes what we need to get over that phase. Sometimes, just feeling the sadness you are going through is important and perfectly okay, because when you feel it, you work through it. It’s all one big learning process on how to cope with your thoughts and emotions. At the end of the day, we’re all humans. Diabetic or not, we go through tough life situations and working through them is just one way to grow as a person and be able to allow for empathy towards others going through difficult life situations.

6/ You are not alone – When you feel like all things are going wrong with your Diabetes, a great way to vent off and work through it all is turning to the amazing T1D community that is out there, waiting to help out in any way. Connecting with others (in person or online via social media) can help you as you will soon realize that you are not the only one dealing with burnout at the moment and that you can fight T1D together. This has been especially helpful to me as I was in a dark place for a while until I turned to the community for help and support. Now, I am at the happiest place I have ever been with my Diabetes and I realized that T1D is not all that bad.

7/ Live your life! – I get it, T1D is a horrible disease. But just remember, you are bigger, better, and stronger than T1D. Remember to smile through it all, laugh daily, and be kind to others. Make life how you want and always choose to stay actively positive, because when you are positive, whether you’re high or low, you will have motivation and strength to keep on going and T1D will just be one of those things in life we end up getting used to. When we feel like we’ve mastered T1D, we’ll be able to accept what’s on our plate at the moment.

I truly hope these tips and tricks on how to cope with T1D burnout helped you out if you are feeling this at the moment. It’s okay to be frustrated at times, but be sure to never stay in that phase forever. Life is too short to stay in a bad place with your Diabetes.

Live well,

Dave

Lyfestories: Jessica Proto’s Breast Cancer Journey

It was the spring of 2017, around March. I was lying in my bed thinking that it had been a while since I did my last breast self-examination. I started to check my left breast and I could quickly feel a small lump there. I checked both breasts and under my arms, no lumps any other places. I asked my boyfriend to check if he could feel it, and he did. I immediately went online and googled “lump in breast”, which led me to several places that explained that a tumor would be hard and very firm, and not easy to move. Since my lump didn’t have those characteristics, I thought that probably it was just a fat cyst, so I waited another month before I checked it again. The second time I checked it I could still feel it; it had the same size, but just to be sure I wanted my doctor to feel it. He sent me to a clinic to take some tests of it. Unfortunately the results came back positive. Me, a 27-year-old girl, had breast cancer.

I think I was in shock at first. I managed to tell my mum that I had some cell alterations, while I told my sister and my brother that I had cancer. Because of my age they wanted me to take another test, just to make sure that it actually was cancer. The second time I got the answer to my result it was easier for me to tell my family and friends that it was, in fact, cancer. I always thought that cancer was something I probably would get when I got old, and it’s still weird for me to think about it.

My lump was small and I started off with surgery the 18th of august 2017. They removed the lump, analyzed it and the tissue around it and found two more tiny lumps. I had to have another surgery to make sure they removed everything, and then started chemotherapy in November. I consider chemo to be my toughest friend. One of those friends that constantly tells you the truth because they want what’s best for you, even if it hurts you a little bit. Chemo hurts my cells, makes my body ache and tired, but it is for my very best. My treatment journey is not over yet, I’ve still got a few months left, and then I can look back at this as a hard chapter of my life.

I am one of the lucky ones and that is why I’ve always tried to stay positive. I know that I’m surviving this so I usually don’t feel that I have any reason to be sad. I do have a bad day now and then, tired of the whole thing and just want to get back to my “normal” life. I miss my long hair and I don’t feel very feminine anymore. But, my hair will grow back, and I will get my “normal” life back. I also found it soothing to share my story with others. It makes me so happy if I can manage to change just one person’s life. I also would like women to open up their eyes and be more aware of this illness. I know a lot of women who started to check themselves at home after finding out about me. I do it every two-three months, and that is why I’m lucky to survive this. My message to you out there, men and women, is: If you are afraid something is wrong or you are not sure how to do a self-examination and need help, call your doctor. It could really save your life like it did to me.

Keep smiling, and stay positive. Life is good.

Lyfestories: Ijmal’s Outlook on Battling Ulcerative Colitis

I am Ijmal Haider, and I have Ulcerative Colitis.

I was diagnosed in November 2015, and prior to my diagnosis I knew very little about the illness. In a very short period of time, summer of 2015, I had lost a significant amount of weight; I was dealing with a lot of cramping and bloating. I went and saw my family doctor, and he said most likely it was stress related but just to be safe he recommended me to a gastroenterologist. Around that time I was dealing with a lot of stress, I was at the peak of my career in Real Estate development, working on the biggest project of my career, I was writing nationally for publications and newspapers, and I was dealing with lots of personal stress as well, so I believed it to be pressure related.

When I met with the GI she asked the pressing questions regarding my lifestyle, my workload, my self-care routines, and all the questions related to my symptoms. Based on the information she had she said it was important we set up a colonoscopy, she said she was suspecting it to be colon cancer. My scope wouldn’t be for another three months from that time. I didn’t want to worry anyone, so I kept her suspicions to myself until my scope. For three months I kept that information to myself and naturally stressed in silence.

In November of 2015 when I had my first colonoscopy I found out I had ulcerative colitis, not colon cancer. In a groggy state, post scope, I struggled to ask the proper questions to understand what the diagnosis meant, I was overloaded with photos and literature and prescriptions.

This allowed me to understand the severity of what I was dealt with, painting a vivid picture of the research I would need to do and the alterations I would need to make to my life. I quickly learned researching diseases on the internet was a trap that seemed to always lead to the darkest corners.

For two years I was consumed with my illness, what it meant for me. I was skeptical to make plans or have fun. My biggest fears were always what if I eat the wrong thing, what if I need to use the bathroom while out, what if I show any sign of weakness amongst my friends,family, and peers. So, I became a bit of a recluse. My illness had taken over my life, all plans revolved around ulcerative colitis. I had put my career, my passions, my creativity and dreams on the back burner.

Spring of 2017, when nothing seemed to be working to reduce inflammation or to make me feel better; I decided to explore Naturopathic medicine, in conjunction with my regular medications. I wanted to try every possible option, so I would have no regrets. In this process I learned so much, I learned the importance of diet, the importance of stress management, understanding what ulcerative colitis actually was and how it affected the body.

I was put on plans to reduce inflammation, create proper diets without irritants, and reduce stress. This definitely helped with many aspects of how I was feeling.

During this time someone close to me gave me one powerful piece of advice, he said “Ijmal, you are not ulcerative colitis,” which really resonated with me. My naturopath had mentioned to start journaling to help reduce the shame, anxiety, stress, and the isolation that the illness brought to my life. When I was diagnosed there were very few outlets I came across that assisted in tackling the psychological effects of having an invisible illness. This is where I decided rather than keeping a private journal I would create a public blog. My blog garnered attention and lead to many people around the world reaching out to me to share their own stories, or to thank me for sharing mine. I was uncovering a community, eliminating shame and stigma, and breaking down the isolation I had felt for the first two years of my diagnosis.

Fall 2017, a friend and I decided to start a web series, called ‘Help Us, YYC’ to tackle the stigma of living with gut issues and invisible illnesses. A tool to educate and help people feel connected and allow them to feel less scared about what they are going through.

In 2018, I find myself having increased inflammation and preparing to start biologic treatments, but I have also found my individuality, my creativity, my career, and purpose again. Through the community I stumbled upon and the stories I have heard I have never felt more prepared to tackle the next step in this journey. I found my peace through the idea of helping others in turn they have ended up helping me.

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